Memorial Day 2013 - Iowa State University Alumni Association

Memorial Day 2013

ALBRIGHT, Miles
June 14, 1922—April 4, 2013; Miles Albright was a typical member of the Greatest Generation. He was born in the 1920s, lived through the Great Depression, served in the United States Army during World War II, married his sweetheart Gwen, fathered their beautiful daughter Vicki, owned a dog, sang a beautiful tenor harmony, worked hard all his life in jobs demanding skill and attention to detail, lived within his means until his death, and loved to make people laugh.. Miles enjoyed life to full measure. He loved putting and keeping things in order—tools, screws, rubber bands, pencils, nails, numbers and accounts. He was a man of order in all things and believed others should be the same. He loved Iowa State wrestling and followed it faithfully until he almost had a stroke during a tournament. He loved listening to well-harmonized music and singing with his four brothers, his church choir, and the Songbirds. He loved bowling, golf and cribbage, playing all three amazingly well after being declared legally blind. Cribbage remained an integral part of his life until last Christmas, when he participated in a four-generation game with his daughter, granddaughter and great granddaughter. Technical cribbage terms like “stink hole” and “getting skunked” will forever be linked to the old cribbage master, Miles. Hitting a hole-in-one on the last hole of the Homewood Golf Course shortly into retirement remained one of the highlights of his sporting career. While he often watched professional golf on his gigantic television, using the occasion to nap in his recliner between holes, it was the only professional sport he tolerated or savored. Flexing his populist muscles, Miles believed most professional sports figures were paid too much. So he refused to watch baseball, basketball and football, and he believed others should do the same. He loved fine dining at low-cost no-frill restaurants with his family and friends and took pride in picking up the tab and paying in cash. (He did have a credit card but used it only once a year to keep it active.) He loved being on the water in a sail boat, row boat, fishing boat, speed boat or ferry boat. He even decided, at one point, if he couldn’t become a farmer he would become a tug boat captain. Complicating this was the fact that he actually hated being in water above his waist because, although he learned to do many things in life, swimming was not one of them. Miles took great pleasure traveling with his family throughout the United States to visit far-flung brothers, cousins, nieces, nephews, and old friends (of which he had many). If he saw some snow-capped mountains or scenic desert vistas or a beautiful river valley along the way, so much the better. His visits to Victoria Island, Vancouver, and seeking out the fall colors of New England with Gwen plus a 2011 trip from La Plata, Missouri, to Los Angeles by train with Vicki were travel dreams come true. With all that beauty out there, he never understood why anyone would travel outside the United States. His Vancouver visit aside, he never left the country and believed Americans would be better off if they followed his lead. Miles lived by the adage, “It makes little difference in life what you do, as long as you do it well.” He learned the value of hard work on the family farm and went on to work hard at a variety of jobs, from serving farmers at Crosley Feed Store to sexing chickens for regional hatcheries, finally settling down into a career as inspector par excellence of new highways for the Iowa DOT and of new buildings for ISU. Of all his joys in life, family was his greatest love. Born at his Aunt Isla’s home on a farm in Grundy County, Iowa, Miles was the third of five country boys. Etta Squires Albright, his mother, died when he was eight years old. His father, Galen, later married Gertrude Albright, who raised the boys to maturity. Miles especially loved his Aunt Wilma Kruschwitz, who cared for the boys while they were motherless. He always considered her his second mother. His life’s great love was Gwendolyn Cakerice, whose eye he caught growing up in the Ivester Church of the Brethren community. Their life together in marriage lasted sixty-four years until Gwen died in 2007. Gwen proved a savvy bridge partner for life and always kept Miles’ more cantankerous side in check. Their daughter, Vicki, was the apple crisp of their eyes from the moment she was born. Her marriage to David Wilcox produced two beloved granddaughters, Sarah and Katharine, who adored their “Po” in return. Through them, Miles and Gwen got to go to Disneyland, Knott’s Berry Farm, Medieval Times and many other wonderful adventures. In later years, Sarah and Katie rewarded Mo and Po with memorable vocal performances in their honor. Then came Kaia, Etta and Isla, Mile’s great granddaughters, by whom he asked to be called “PoPo.” They all will miss this wonderful man who created a quality model for fathers and grandfathers everywhere. A memorial service for Miles will take place on Monday, April 8, at Northcrest Retirement Community, 1801 20th Street. Miles’ family wishes to thank the Northcrest staff for the many kindnesses extended to them and to Gwen and Miles over the past thirteen years. They created a community of security, steadfastness and love. Should friends of Miles wish to honor his memory, a gift to Iowa Public Television is requested in lieu of flowers.


BAKER, John R.
Dr. Baker, zoologist, was born on January 6, 1930 and died on January 27, 2012. Surviving Dr. Baker is his widowed spouse, Carol Mc Ginn.


BEAL, George M.
George Melvin Beal was born in Parkdale, Ore. to Isaac and Anna Mae Beal. He had an older brother, Bob (wife Eleanor). Before transferring to Iowa State University, he attended Oregon State College. While at Iowa State, he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in economics and a doctorate in sociology. He was awarded the Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor Award in 1973. In 1983, he was awarded the Henry A. Wallace Award for Distinguished Service to Agriculture. He was a major professor for many graduate students who loved him. During World War II, he was an Army captain and served with the Mule Pack Artillery in the CBI Theater.

After retiring from ISU in 1977, he and his family moved to Kailua, Hawaii, where he took a position as professor in the Communications Institute at the East West Center. He enjoyed 35 years of living in paradise with the love of his life.

He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Evelyn (Lull) Beal; two daughters, Carolee (Tim) Preston, and Linda (Patrick) Tyler; two sons, Dirk (Carol) Beal, and David (Laura) Beal; eight grandchildren; and three great-granddaughters.

Private services have been held. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to St. John Lutheran Church in Kailua, or Bread for the World (bread.org).


BENN, Charles
With dignity and confidence, Chuck went to a very justly-earned place with our Heavenly Father on Dec. 23, 2012,at the age of 94.

Charles “Chuck” Laverne Benn was born Nov. 2, 1918, to Ruben and Addie Benn in Gilbert, at the onset of the Great Depression. Hard work and equally hard times was the backdrop that would forge the work ethic, frugal lifestyle and high moral values on which the rest of his life was built. He graduated from Gilbert High School in 1936.

Enlisting in the U.S. Army in January 1942, Chuck served under Gen. George Patton in Egypt. He worked as a clerk in the Fifteenth Air Service Group and was promoted to staff sergeant in February 1943. He earned multiple ribbons and awards, including a Good Conduct Medal and Bronze Stars. He was honorably discharged on Sept. 9, 1945.

Upon returning home, he worked as a photographer for 36 years at Iowa State University Agricultural Extension Service. Loving the work so much, he returned to work with the ISU Veterinary Biomedical Communications Department for an additional 21 years after his initial “retirement.” Distinctions awarded during his tenure included memberships to Epsilon Sigma Phi and Gamma Sigma Delta, and the Superior Service Award.

Early in his career, he met his wife, Ruth Zimmerman, on a blind date arranged by his brother and sister-in-law. They were married at Little Brown Church in Nashua on July 26, 1954. Making their home at 230 Hickory Drive in Ames, they had their only child, James Douglas, in September 1956. They were married for 49 years until Ruth’s death in 2003.

He had many joys in his life, including: his wife, son, grandsons, his daughter in-law, his church and faith, flying airplanes, riding motorcycles, (the preceding three things went well together) going on fishing trips, knowing pretty much everybody on the ISU campus, the Dewhurst family, his great neighbors on Hickory Drive, the guys that congregated at the West Ames Hy-Vee for coffee and politics, (those guys should be running Washington, D.C.) the gang that went to country music jams and dancing on Saturday nights, big band music, Studebaker cars, volunteering at the United Way, and a long list of very special friends that are too numerous to mention here.


BENSON, Robert
Robert John Benson, 89, of Ames died November 12, 2012, at Northcrest Retirement Community. A gathering of family and friends will be at 4:30-6:00 p.m., Thursday, November 15, with a funeral service at 6:00 p.m. at the First Evangelical Church in Ames with Rev. David Staff officiating. Burial will be in the Ames Municipal Cemetery.

Robert John Benson was born in Boone, Iowa to Evald and Margaret Blakeley Benson on May 31, 1923. He graduated from Boone High School in 1942. He joined the Boone First Baptist Church in 1944. On September, 15, 1946 he married Betty Ruth Hoyt in Boone. They lived in many areas of the country and also overseas as he pursued his education and military career. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Iowa and his master's degree from Drake University.

During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy as a Radarman aboard a Landing Ship Medium in the Pacific. After graduation from college in 1948 he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Adjutant General Corps and served on active duty as a special agent in the Counter Intelligence Corps until 1953. He continued serving on the faculty of several U.S. Army Reserve Schools in Iowa and Indiana. His last reserve duty assignment was as Deputy Director of Training and Education, U.S. Army Institute of Administration, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. He retired in May, 1983 with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel having served 31 years of duty with the Navy, Army, and Army Reserves.
He worked for thirty-five years in personnel and administration, Department of Residence, Iowa State University, until he retired in January, 1989. He was a member of Ames First Baptist Church for many years and later a member of the First Evangelical Free Church.

Survivors include his wife, Betty Hoyt Benson, of Ames, one daughter, Ruthann Elaine Benson of LaCrosse, WI, one son, Steven Robert (Cathy) Benson of Bettendorf, IA, three grandchildren: Michael (Heather) Miars of Duluth, Georgia, Morgan Benson and Blake Benson both of Bettendorf, IA, and five great grandchildren.

BLAIR, Robert
Robert Blair age 92, of Slater went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on Sunday, February 10, 2013 at his home in Slater. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, February 13, 2013, at 10:30 a.m. at the Perry Bible Church located at Highway 141 & 12th St. in Perry. Visitation will be Tuesday, February 12, 2013 from 1:00 to 8:00 p.m. with the family present from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Carris Family Funeral Home, located at 1721 Park St. in Perry. Burial will be in the Slater Cemetery at Slater. In lieu of flowers, memorials donations will be given to Perry Bible Church and may be left at the Funeral Home.

Robert Owen Blair was born on November 28, 1920 in Whiting, Iowa, the son of John W. Blair and Bertha (Allison) Blair. The family moved from Iowa to Stratton, Colorado in 1923 to help his ailing grandfather run the Blair general store and take care of Grandpa Blair. After his death they relocated to Wichita, Kansas in 1927. Bob attended Wichita, Kansas schools graduating from East High in 1938, attended WSU a year, worked at Cessna Aircraft Co. in experimental Engr. until volunteering for the U.S. Air Corps during WW2 and served from 42 to 46, working alternately as student, then instructor. In various ground controlled approach electronic schools until the war was over. He was released in 1946 and attended Kansas State University in the Electrical Engineering program graduating with a BS in Electrical Engineering in 1951. In November 1948 he married Doris Livers and they lived in Manhattan Kansas until graduation and moved to Cedar Rapids, Iowa in Sept 1951 where he worked for then Collins Radio Co as an electrical engineer until 1964 when he moved to Ames.

He lived in Robins, Iowa while working at Collins and served as Mayor from 59 - 64. And was approached by a fellow worker at Collins to get permission to use the old empty schoolhouse which the town had acquired, to use for a new church he had moved to Robins to help start, but Before he asked about the church he shared his faith in Christ and asked Bob to make a commitment. As he reflected on these things later that night he did pray to receive Christ. This was a turning point in his life as he learned more about the Bible and living for the Lord. While living in Robins he became the father of 2 girls.

In 1964 he worked as Chief engineer for Hach Chemical Co. then was Asst. Professor of electronics at Iowa State University from 65-73 and was faculty advisor for Campus Crusade for Christ. As the technical program was ending he earned his master’s degree in Vocational Counseling and worked from 73-76 in Chillicothe, Missouri Vocational Technical School - Moved back to Iowa and established Blair Electric 76 - 82. He then served as East IA, Bible Camp director 82-84, back to Iowa State as Academic Advisor Elec. Eng. 84 to 92 when he retired. After retiring from Iowa State, Bob drove semis part time and worked for friends wiring houses.

He is survived by his wife, Doris, 2 daughters, Ann Watson of Forsyth, MO. and Jean Blair of Orange City, IA, 7 grandchildren, 3 great grandchildren, a brother, John R Blair and his wife Jean of Rancho Mirage, CA., a sister in law, Hazel L. Blair of Chanute, KS, a nephew, James L. Blair and wife Julie, of Overland Park, KS, and a niece Laurie Blair of Phoenix, AZ.


Tribute by David C. Jiles, Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Robert Blair was an assistant professor of electronics, an electrical engineer at Collins Radio, and a bible camp director, among many other things. He died Feb. 10, 2013 at the age of 92.

Blair came to Iowa State in 1965 after serving as chief engineering at Hach Chemical Co. Blair served eight years as an assistant professor and was a faculty advisor for Campus Crusade for Christ. He left ISU to earn a master’s degree in vocational counseling and worked at the Missouri Vocational Technical School in Chillicothe, Mo. from 1973-76.

He returned to Iowa in 1976 and founded Blair Electric, where he worked from 1976-82. After a two-year stretch as East Iowa Bible Camp Director (1982-84), Blair returned to Iowa State as an academic adviser for the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He remained at Iowa State until his retirement in 1992.

Blair earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Kansas State in 1951. Prior to his time in Manhattan, Kan., he volunteered for the United State Air Corps during World War II, serving from 1942-46 and aiding the Corps with its ground-controlled approach electronics. He moved to Iowa shortly after receiving his degree to go to work at Collins Radio Company. While employed at Collins, he served as mayor of Robins, Iowa from 1959-64

He is survived by his wife, Doris, 2 daughters, Ann Watson of Forsyth, MO. and Jean Blair of Orange City, IA, 7 grandchildren, 3 great grandchildren, a brother, John R Blair and his wife Jean of Rancho Mirage, CA., a sister in law, Hazel L. Blair of Chanute, KS, a nephew, James L. Blair and wife Julie, of Overland Park, KS, and a niece Laurie Blair of Phoenix, AZ.


BLAUW, Donald A.
Donald was born on December 13, 1933 and passed away on Friday, October 16, 2009.
Donald was a resident of Onawa, Iowa.


BORTS, Lloyd Carl
Lloyd Carl Borts, 92, passed away January 8, 2013 at Mary Greeley Medical Center in Ames. Funeral services will be 10:30 a.m. January 11, at Adams Funeral Home in Ames. Burial will be in Ames Municipal Cemetery. The family will receive friends 5 to 7 p.m. January 10, at Adams Funeral Home.

Lloyd Borts was born January 14, 1920 to Archie Lloyd and Myrtle (Pitts) Borts in Colfax, Iowa. Lloyd grew up in the Fernald area and graduated from Fernald High School in 1939. After school, he started farming until 1964 when he went to work for the Iowa DOT as a heavy equipment operator, retiring in 1982. Lloyd and Patricia Ann Johnson were married on March 10, 1951 in Indianola, Iowa. They moved to Ames in 1952 where he was a member of First United Methodist Church, the Farm Bureau, and the Ames Moose Lodge. He enjoyed watching baseball, softball, doing word games and working in his yard.

Lloyd is survived by his wife Patricia Borts of Ames; his son, Steve Borts of Ames; three sisters-in-law, Ida Mae Hatcher of Indianola, Mary Lou Borts of Nevada and Vivian Borts of Ames; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents; his sister Wilma; and two brothers, Willard and Max.

Memorials may be designated to First United Methodist Church in Ames or the American Diabetes Foundation.  Lloyd suggested casual dress for those people attending the service.


BRADSHAW, Larry
Larry Bradshaw age 72, of Nevada, died at his home on Tuesday, Jan 15, 2013. A gathering of friends and family will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, Jan.18, 2013, at Bethel Church in rural Boone with a 10 a.m. funeral service on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at Bethel Church in rural Boone with a 3 p.m. graveside service at Chester Center Cemetery in Grinnell.

Larry LeRoy Bradshaw was born Nov. 7, 1940, in Iowa City, to Arza Bradshaw. He was raised in Cedar Rapids, graduating from Jefferson High School in 1959. He attended Bethel College, St. Paul, Minn., and earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls. He taught in the Cedar Rapids Schools for 14 years before beginning his teaching career for 25 years at Iowa State University in Ames, where he earned a doctorate degree in industrial education and technology. He received the G. Harold Silvus graduate student award and later received the Epsilon Pi Tau Laureate Award. He was a member of the Epsilon Pi Tau and the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars.

He spent a summer with the USAID Teach Corp in Kathmandu, Nepal, was selected as a Fulbright Scholar to Cyprus. With his family, he spent a year in Papua New Guinea under the Summer Institute of Linguistics. He was a delegate under Lt. Gov. Anderson’s Trade Mission to Korea and the following year took ISU students to Korea on a work-study program. After retiring from ISU, he spent the next five years at the Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (GIAL) where he first opened up the international student office and then served as dean of academics. Upon returning from Texas, they moved from their acreage southwest of Ames to Nevada. He was a member and past elder of Bethel Church, rural Boone, and volunteered on the disaster team for Red Cross for a number of years.
He was married to Glenda Sears in Grinnell on Oct. 5, 1963. He is survived by his wife and his three daughters, Melinda (Dave) Connon, of Earlham, Jenny (Rick) Brenner, of Antioch, Ill., and Betsy Eness, of Ames; three grandchildren, Maxwell Eness, Kathryn Brenner and Bethany Connon; and one sister, Leeta House.

He was preceded in death by his mother, Arza Bradshaw.


May 2013 ISU Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

November 7, 1940 – January 15, 2013
Larry Bradshaw age 72, of Nevada, died at his home on Tuesday, Jan 15, 2013. Larry was born November 7, 1940 in Iowa City, Iowa, to Arza Bradshaw. He was raised in Cedar Rapids, graduating from Jefferson High School in 1959. He attended Bethel College, St. Paul, MN, and received his bachelors and masters from the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls.

Dr. Bradshaw began his teaching career in the Cedar Rapids Schools where he taught for 14 years. He then started his career in higher education at Iowa State University where he served as an Assistant Professor in Industrial Education & Technology from 1979 to 2004, completing his Ph.D. in 1984.

During his time as a Ph.D. candidate he received the G. Harold Silvius graduate student award and later received the Epsilon Pi Tau Laureate Award. He was a member of the Epsilon Pi Tau and the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars. He spent a summer with the USAID Teach Corp in Kathmandu, Nepal, was selected as a Fulbright Scholar to Cyprus. With his family, he spent a year in Papua New Guinea under the Summer Institute of Linguistics. He was a delegate under Lt. Governor Anderson's Trade Mission to Korea and the following year took Iowa State students to Korea on a work-study program.

After retiring from Iowa State in 2004, he spent the next five years at the Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (GIAL) where he first opened up the international student office and then served as Dean of Academics. Upon returning from Texas, they moved from their acreage SW of Ames to Nevada. He was a member and past elder of Bethel Church, rural Boone, and volunteered on the disaster team for Red Cross for a number of years.

He was married to Glenda Sears at Grinnell, October 5, 1963. He is survived by his wife and his three daughters--Melinda (Dave) Connon of Earlham, Iowa, Jenny (Rick) Brenner of Antioch, IL, and Betsy Eness of Ames, by 3 grandchildren - Maxwell Eness, Kathryn Brenner, and Bethany Connon and his sister, Leeta House. He was preceded in death by his mother, Arza Bradshaw.


BUECHLER, Marvin W.
Marvin W. Buechler, 95, formerly of Boone, IA passed away Thursday, December 27, 2012 at Mill-Pond Retirement Community in Ankeny, IA. He will be cremated and a memorial service will be held at a later date.

Survivors include his wife, Arlene Buechler of Ankeny, IA; son, Stan (Georgiann) Buechler of Ankeny, IA; daughter, Pam (Ron) Tesdell of Ankeny, IA; four grandchildren, Pete and Erin Buechler of Des Moines, IA; and Matt and Mike Tesdell of Des Moines, IA; five great-grandchildren, brother, Eugene (Marjorie) Buechler of Boone, IA; and a sister, Doris Finck of West Des Moines, IA.


Tribute by his wife, Arlene M. Buechler

Marvin W. Buechler, 95, passed away December 27, 2012 in Ankeny, Iowa at the Presbyterian Mill Pond Health Care Center.

He was a Boone, Iowa native and lived in Ames for 21 years during his working years at Iowa State University, where he worked in the Agronomy Department as a Field Laboratory Research Technician.
Marvin was a person who enjoyed life especially enjoying his family, his home, and his work and was dedicated to each one.  

In 1986 he was awarded the Superior Service Award at Iowa State University given by the Alumni Association of I.S.U.


BURNET, Agatha Louise Huepenbecker
Agatha Louise Huepenbecker Burnet 81, passed from this life on Thursday, August 23, 2012 at Israel Family Hospice House in Ames following a battle with colon cancer. A memorial service will be held at 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, August 28th at Memorial Lutheran Church, 2228 Lincoln Way in Ames.

Agatha was born on November 23, 1930 to Arthur Walter and Margaret (Soest) Huepenbecker in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She graduated from South Side High School in Fort Wayne in 1948 and then earned the B.S. in Textiles and Clothing (T&C) from Indiana University in 1952, the M.S. in T&C from Iowa State University in 1952 and the Ph.D. in Home Economics Education from Ohio State University in 1969. She taught high school vocational home economics in Valparaiso, Indiana from 1952 -1955 before joining the faculty in T&C at Iowa State University in 1956 where she served until retiring in 1993 as Emeritus Professor. From 1973 through 1993 she was Head of the Department.

Agatha's professional career was marked by outstanding service, most often in a position of leadership, and by many distinguished awards and recognitions. She was national president of the American Home Economics Association, regional vice president of the academic honorary, Phi Kappa Phi, on the governing boards of the Iowa State University Foundation and the Alumni Association, and president of the Mary Greeley Medical Center Foundation Board. Her many awards included the Distinguished Service Award of the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, Distinguished Alumnus Award from Ohio State University, The Iowa State University Faculty Citation, Alumni Medal and Order of the Knoll Faculty and Staff Award, the Ames Chamber of Commerce Professionalism and Leadership Award, the Tribune Unsung Hero Award and the Iowa Home Economics Association Hall of Fame. She was an Associate of the Smithsonian Institute and an international authority on the historic aspects on textiles and clothing.

Agatha is survived by her husband George whom she married in 1995; step children Kathryn Andre of Ames, Betty Jo (Mark) Smith of Albuquerque, NM, Dolores Day of Clovis, CA, Joan (Joe) Bruns of Edmond, OK, Elaine Burnet of Tacoma, WA and George Jr. (Susan) of Cranberry Township, PA; step grandchildren Elizabeth Andre, Brian, Sharon and Christine Smith, Steven and John Day, Aaron, Paul and Michael Bruns, and Kaye, George, Grant and Gregory Burnet; step great grandchild Junia Smith; sister-in-law Bonnie Huepenbecker of Fort Wayne, IN; nephew Jack (Joette) Murray of Chicago, IL; and nieces Monica Murray and Holly (Mark) Hull of Indianapolis, IN. She was preceded in death by her parents; a sister, Margaret (Jack) Murray; and a brother, Herbert (Bonnie) Huepenbecker.

Visitation will be held with family receiving friends from 7:00 until 9:00 on Monday, August 27th, at Memorial Lutheran Church where Agatha was a member for 56 years. Those wishing to express their sympathies through a memorial may direct their gift to the Memorial Lutheran Church.

A private family graveside service will be held at the Iowa State University Cemetery at a later date.


Tribute by Sara Marcketti, AESHM Department
December 2012 Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

November 23, 1930 - August 23, 2012
Agatha Huepenbecker Burnet joined the faculty in Textiles &Clothing (now Apparel, Merchandising, and Design) at Iowa State University in 1956 where she served until retiring in 1993 as Emeritus Professor.

Prior to joining the faculty, she earned a B.S. in Textiles and Clothing (T&C) from Indiana University in 1952, a M.S. in T&C from Iowa State University in 1952, and the Ph.D. in Home Economics Education from Ohio State University in 1969. From 1973 through 1993 she was Head of the Department. Agatha's professional career was marked by outstanding service, most often in a position of leadership, and by many distinguished awards and recognitions. She was national president of the American Home Economics Association, regional vice president of the academic honorary, Phi Kappa Phi, on the governing boards of the Iowa State University Foundation and the Alumni Association, and president of the Mary Greeley Medical Center Foundation Board.

Her many awards included the Distinguished Service Award of the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, Distinguished Alumnus Award from Ohio State University, The Iowa State University Faculty Citation, Alumni Medal and Order of the Knoll Faculty and Staff Award, the Ames Chamber of Commerce Professionalism and Leadership Award, the Tribune Unsung Hero Award and the Iowa Home Economics Association Hall of Fame. She was an Associate of the Smithsonian Institute and an international authority on the historic aspects on textiles and clothing. Even in retirement, Agatha continued to be an ardent supporter of the Apparel, Merchandising, and Design Program and the Textiles and Clothing Museum. Agatha is survived by her husband, George, whom she married in 1995.


CALDWELL, Wallace
Wallace C. Caldwell, 94, passed away September 29, 2012, at Wesley Acres in Des Moines.

Funeral Services will be held 1 p.m. Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at Ankeny First United Methodist Church (206 SW Walnut Street). A visitation will be held one hour prior, also at the church.

Wally was born September 9, 1918 to Leona and Harry Caldwell, on the family farm near Britt, Iowa. He attended country grade School and graduated from Britt High School in 1935. Wally received a bachelor and master's degree from Iowa State University, and his PHD from Cornell University in Ithica, New York. His degrees in physics led to work at the Radiation Lab at M.I.T. developing radar systems, Bendix Corporation manufacturing electron tubes, and Collins Radio Company developing circuit boards. Wally also served as Budget Officer for the Iowa Board of Regents compiling data for decisions on distribution of resources for the State Universities. After retiring, returned to Iowa State University to teach electrical engineering and write a high school physics text book. Several awards were received including being listed in the 2001 Who's Who in the World.

Personal activities through the years ranged from 4H and Boy Scouts to Kiwanis and other professional groups. Wally was a lifelong member of the Methodist Church. He enjoyed skiing and sailing with his family as well as traveling in his later years. Wally was married 47 years to Beth Dawson. After her passing in 1995, he married LaVaune Wood, in 1998, who had been a high school classmate.

Wally was preceded in death by his parents, a sister Ruth, his wife Beth, his son Greg, a nephew David, and a granddaughter.

He is survived by his wife, LaVaune, a daughter, Linda Gahring, a sister Dorothy (Eric) Jacobsen, daughter-in-law, Phyllis Caldwell, a niece Katherine Young, two nephews, Richard Young and Steve Jacobsen, four grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, one great-great-grandchild, and great-nieces and nephews.

Memorials may be directed to Ankeny First United Methodist Church, Iowa State University Engineering Department, or the Wesley Acres Good Samaritan Fund.


Tribute written by Randall Wood, LaVaune Caldwell’s son, on behalf of LaVaune Wood Caldwell, wife of Wallace C. Caldwell

Wallace C. Caldwell was born September 9, 1918 near Britt, Iowa.  He came to Ames in 1935, where he took botany courses that those who grew upon farms usually did, but also physics, which became an abiding passion.  A favorite professor was Dr. John Vincent Atanasoff, who taught him integral calculus and three advanced physics courses.  Wally was awarded a Master of Science degree in December 1940.

After work developing radar at M.I.T. during World War II, a Ph.D in physics from Cornell, three years of teaching physics at ISU and two decades of success in private sector electrical engineering, Wally became Budget Officer for the Iowa Board of Regents.  Upon retiring he returned to Ames as an adjunct professor of electrical engineering where his students greatly appreciated his real world work experience.

It was during these years that Wally began advocating that Dr. Atanasoff be recognized for constructing the world’s first electronic digital computer at ISU during the late 1930s.  After the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering granted Dr. Atanasoff this recognition in 1990, Wally was honored to present his mentor with a photograph of the award inscription at his home in Maryland.

Wally retired from ISU in 1993.  He passed away in Des Moines September 29, 2012.


Tribute by David C. Jiles, Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Wallace C. Caldwell (1918-2012)
Without the efforts of Wallace C. “Wally” Caldwell, Iowa State University wouldn’t be known as the place where the first digital electronic computer was invented.

Caldwell was born September 9, 1918 to parents Harry and Leona Caldwell. He grew up on the family farm in Britt, Iowa, along with his two sisters.  After graduating from Britt High School in 1935, Caldwell attended Iowa State University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 1939, and his master’s degree in physics a year later. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in physics from Cornell. His physics expertise led him to work in developing radar systems at M.I.T.’s Radiation Lab. He went on to work for the Bendix Corporation making electron tubes, followed by circuit board development at Collins Radio Company. Caldwell served as a Budget Officer on the Iowa Board of Regents, gathering data to make decisions on funding distributions for Iowa’s public universities. All in just a few short years before returning to Iowa State.

In 1948, Caldwell retired from his professional career and started his academic profession. He began his faculty career at Iowa State as a staff member in the Physics Department, becoming an Associate Physicist in 1950. Eventually Caldwell was named Adjunct Professor of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering before finally retiring and becoming an Emeritus Adjunct Professor of ECpE until his death.

Caldwell advocated for the correction of the long-ignored mistake of who first invented the digital electronic computer. His correspondence with various organizations advocating to give John Vincent Atanasoff and Clifford Berry credit for the first computer was compiled and published as the Wallace C. Caldwell papers, which are available at Parks Library. Caldwell’s efforts were essential in the recognition of Atanasoff and Berry, and a plaque honoring Caldwell for his work still hangs in the Physics Hall today.


May 2013 Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Wallace C. Caldwell (1918-2012)
Without the efforts of Wallace C. “Wally” Caldwell, Iowa State University wouldn’t be known as the place where the first digital electronic computer was invented. He was an accomplished alumnus, teacher, scientist, and engineer, on top of being a husband and father. Caldwell died September 29 in the Wesley Acres retirement home in Des Moines. He was 94.

Caldwell was born September 9, 1918 to parents Harry and Leona Caldwell. He grew up on the family farm in Britt, Iowa, along with his two sisters. After graduating from Britt High School in 1935, Caldwell attended Iowa State University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 1939, and his master’s degree in physics a year later. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in physics from Cornell. His physics expertise led him to work in developing radar systems at M.I.T.’s Radiation Lab. He went on to work for the Bendix Corporation making electron tubes, followed by circuit board development at Collins Radio Company. Caldwell served as a Budget Officer on the Iowa Board of Regents, gathering data to make decisions on funding distributions for Iowa’s public universities. All in just a few short years before returning to Iowa State.

In 1948, Caldwell retired from his professional career and started his academic profession. He began his faculty career at Iowa State as a staff member in the Physics Department, becoming an Associate Physicist in 1950. Eventually Caldwell was named Adjunct Professor of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering before finally retiring and becoming an Emeritus Adjunct Professor of ECpE until his death.

Caldwell advocated for the correction of the long-ignored mistake of who first invented the digital electronic computer. His correspondence with various organizations advocating to give John Vincent Atanasoff and Clifford Berry credit for the first computer was compiled and published as the Wallace C. Caldwell papers, which are available at Parks Library. Caldwell’s efforts were essential in the recognition of Atanasoff and Berry, and a plaque honoring Caldwell for his work still hangs in the Physics Hall today.

Caldwell will be remembered by his family, friends, and colleagues as a caring and adventurous man. He enjoyed skiing and sailing, and traveled during his later years. He was also known for his support of 4H and the Boy Scouts of America, and was a lifelong member of the Methodist Church. He also contributed generously to Iowa State’s ECpE scholarship fund.

He is survived by his second wife, LaVaune; his daughter, Linda Gahring; his sister, Dorothy Jacobsen;his daughter-in-law, Phyllis Caldwell; a niece and two nephews, four grand-children, eight great-grandchildren, one great-great-grandchild, and great-nieces and nephews.


CANUTE, Virginia
Virginia Canute, 96, of Ames, died Dec. 9, 2012 at Iowa Specialty Hospital in Clarion. Memorial services will be at 11 a.m. Friday, Dec. 14, at Collegiate Presbyterian Church in Ames. A visitation will be one hour prior to the service. Burial will be in Ames Municipal Cemetery.

Virginia Elaine Canute was born May 9, 1916, to Chester J. and Ethel (Haggard) Stewart in St. Paul, Minn. She earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Minnesota and did graduate work at the University of Wyoming and was a member of the alumni association. She taught kindergarten for 17 years and worked for the Iowa State University library for 14 years. She was an active member of Collegiate Presbyterian Church and served on the board of deacons. She was a 50-year member of the Order of Eastern Star, belonged to ISU Women’s Club for more than 35 years and was very active in Ames Thrift Shop. She served as a leader and as board president of the Ames Camp Fire Organization.

She married Russell J. Canute in 1946, and they were married for 46 years at the time of his passing.
She is survived by one son, Jack (Lucila) Canute, of Boone; two daughters, Suann Canute, of Miami, Fla., and Christie (Mike) Leonard, of Johnston; and nine grandchildren and their children.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Russell, and one brother, Larry Stewart.


CARLSON, David
David L. Carlson, Ph.D., a long time engineering professor and inventor of several notable devices, passed away Monday, March 11, 2013, in Ames.

David was born and raised in Minneapolis. He was the first son of Myrtle and Lawrence Carlson. David graduated from Washburn High School in Minneapolis. He earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1958. David often shared many memories of working at the university radio station while a student. He followed his father’s and shared his brother’s passion for electronics.

David continued his studies at the Iowa State University, receiving a master’s degree in 1961 and a doctorate in 1964 in electrical engineering. While a biomedical engineering graduate student at ISU, David, along with four collaborators, developed one of the first infant respiratory augmentors. This device has saved the lives of countless prematurely born infants. The technology was patented in 1967. David received the Iowa Patent Law Association’s Inventor of the Year Award, as well as the Faculty Citation award from the Iowa State University Alumni Association for this device.

David had an extensive background in electrical engineering and spent time working with and advising numerous organizations including the Los Alamos Lab in New Mexico, NASA and the World Health Organization. In 1963, David, along with his business partner, formed the Minneapolis-based company Renco which markets ultrasound technology for the detection of pregnancy in livestock. David’s invention is used all over the world.

In spite of his many inventions and business accomplishments, David’s passion was being a professor. He taught graduate and undergraduate biomedical engineering students during his 30-year tenure at ISU.

Over his career, David earned eight patents. He collaborated with 28 co-authors and was cited by 57 other authors in industry-related papers and works in 13 different publications. He was a member and leader in a number of professional organizations. David was an expert witness in many court trials regarding electronic device failure.

David was a caring neighbor, often helping others with snow removal. He was active in his neighborhood association, holding the treasurer position for many years. David always enjoyed a comic strip from fellow University of Minnesota graduate, Charles Schulz. David also enjoyed worldwide travel and reading.

David was preceded in death by his parents, Myrtle and Lawrence Carlson, and brother, Douglas. He is survived by his sister, Barbara Ulven (Atlanta), nieces and nephews in California and Atlanta, and many friends and neighbors in Ames and Minneapolis.

A celebration of life will be held in Ames on May 5, 2013.


Tribute by David C. Jiles, Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
May 2013 Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

David L. Carlson (1936-2013)
David L. Carlson was a prolific biomedical inventor, and is responsible for technology that’s saved the lives of many premature babies.

Carlson began his career at Iowa State As a graduate student, receiving his master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1961, and going on to earn his PhD in 1964.  He joined the faculty, where despite earning eight patents throughout his time, most enjoyed teaching and working with undergraduate students.

In 1964, there was only one infancee respiratory augmenter available, and it wasn’t very effective.  Carlson sought to change that, and helped create a new model of infant respiratory augmenter.  Carlson’s machine was the first in the word capable of supporting premature babies of only one or two pounds, keeping them alive when past technology couldn’t.  His technology proved far superior to what was on the market.  His respirator was especially prolific because the late President John F. Kennedy lost his premature born son, Patrick, to a disease Carlson’s respirator successfully combated.

After very successful tests on premature babies at Mary Greeley Hospital in Ames, Carlson briefly moved to New York City to continue testing his augmenter on babies in the city’s neonatal intensive care unit at the children’s hospital.  He patented the device, earning Iowa State nearly $500,000 until the patent expired in the mid-1980s.  Carlson was named Inventor of the Year by the Iowa Patent Law Association’s Inventor for his greatest invention.  He also received the prestigious Faculty Citation award from the Iowa State Alumni Association.

Carlson eventually retired from Iowa State, but continued working on new biomedical technologies.  He developed ultrasound technology for livestock, allowing farmers to detect pregnancy in their animals, particularly in pigs.  RenCo Corporation in Minneapolis took a vested interest in his work, and they started working with him to manufacture his product.  Even after professional retirement, Carlson continued working with RenCo, traveling around the world and demonstrating his livestock ultrasound device, which is still in use today.

Carlson will always be remembered as a dedicated researcher, an inspiring teacher, a successful businessman, and with his greatest invention, a savior of children.


CHARLES, Donald
Don was born on April 22, 1918, and grew up in Dayton, Iowa. He attended Dayton High School, Fort Dodge Junior College, and Iowa State Teachers College (now UNI). Following a stint of teaching, he entered the service of his country in 1941. After attending Officer Candidate School and the US Army Armor School he served in Europe as an officer in the 736th Tank Battalion, earning three battle stars and the Bronze Star medal for courage under fire.

Following the war he returned to the US where, boarding a train one day in 1945, he found himself seated next to an appealing young woman. A year and a half later they were married, and he and Anne shared life for the next 65 years. Don earned his M.A. and PhD degrees at the University of Nebraska and in 1951 joined the Department of Psychology at Iowa State University, where he practiced his profession until retirement in 1988, remaining Professor Emeritus until his death. Throughout his career he greatly enjoyed lecturing and teaching at universities throughout the country. Don founded and headed the ISU Honors Program, making it possible for gifted students to pursue work at a higher level than would have been available without the program. During his career he produced scores of professional books and papers, including a textbook which became a standard in teacher education both here and abroad. He was also a pioneer and leader in what was then the emerging field of gerontology. Don was a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Gerontological Society, and served on many boards and committees related to psychology and aging at the local, state, and national levels.

Don loved music, literature, and - his passion from boyhood onward - gardening and horticulture. He was a longtime member of the Ames Choral Society and a former Trustee of the Ames Public Library. Don and Anne always took great pleasure in travel. Retirement allowed them to visit many parts of the world, but it was always clear that what they enjoyed most about each trip was experiencing it together. At home they each pursued a multitude of hobbies and interests, usually in the company of a cat or two.

Don was always busy. He once wrote “Work is what I know, and what I am impelled to do, but I define ‘work’ in a fashion that pleases me.” Throughout his life he seized the day and lived in the present. For Don and for Anne too, yesterday was gone, tomorrow might never come, but today was always in their hands.

Don was preceded in death by his parents Claude and Helen and his daughter Linda. He leaves behind his wife Anne Mallonee Charles, children Chris, Laura, and Andrew, grandchildren Jenny, Sara, and Jay Schrader, Brittany and Nick Penlerick, Owen Charles, Lee and Nora Charles, and great-grandson Alejandro.


CLEPPE, Larry
Larry Cleppe, 77, passed away May 23, 2012. A Remembrance Ceremony will be held Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 10 a.m. at the Izaak Walton League on Stage Coach Road in Ames.

Larry was born March 21, 1935 in Brooklyn, Iowa. He lived in Ames for many years and was retired from ISU Maintenance. Larry enjoyed spending time with friends and family, his dog Wilbur, and sharing interesting stories of his life. He was a longtime member of the Izaak Walton League.

Larry is survived by his daughter, Michelle (Mark) Garrison of Angleton, Texas; son, Pete Cleppe of North Port, Florida; step-daughter, Cathy Marsh of Boone; grandchildren, James Wismer and Jennifer Wismer both of Ames; great-grandson, Trenton Lack of Ames; many nieces and nephews; and many, many friends.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Izaak Walton League, in care of Lee Van Brocklin 2720 Northridge Lane, Ames, Iowa 50010.


COADY, Larry
Larry Coady, 80, of Ames, died Thursday at his home. A gathering of friends and family will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, March 10, with a remembrance service at 4 p.m. at Grandon Funeral and Cremation Care, 414 Lincoln Way, Ames and a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Monday, March 11, at St. Cecilia Catholic Church, 30th Street and Hoover Avenue in Ames.

Larry was born March 4, 1933 in Ottumwa to Samuel and Josephine (Denefe) Coady. He graduated from Albia High School and attended Iowa State College briefly before enlisting in the U.S. Navy. He served in the Korean War for four years doing naval intelligence work in Japan. Upon his return Larry worked for a meat packing facility in Ottumwa and TV station KTVO. He then returned to Iowa State College where he earned his bachelors’ degree in electrical engineering in 1959 and then went to work for Collins Radio Co. in Cedar Rapids. Larry then returned to Iowa State University where he earned his M.S. degree in 1963, followed by a PHD in 1965, all while raising a growing family.

Larry was united in marriage to Mary Anne Gannon on Dec. 29, 1956, in Albia. They moved to Ames and joined St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church. Larry served as an associate professor in Electrical engineering, retiring in 1992 after thirty years on the ISU faculty.

Along the way, Larry began to buy and manage student rental properties near the campus. His first large scale residential construction project was completed in 1997. He established Coady Enterprises; a family owned and operated rental property management company. In 2011, he broke ground on his second multi-unit complex, overseeing construction until its completion in July 2012.

His family and friends will most remember him for his engaging conversation, sense of humor and intelligence. He will be remembered for his tenacious desire to work hard to build a better life for his family and others. At heart, he was a teacher whom had a wealth of knowledge to share and took every opportunity to offer guidance to those lives he touched. His family will be forever blessed by his love, wise words of wisdom, and amazing generosity. Children, grandchildren and dear friends will forever cherish fond memories of water skiing, summer barbecues and July 4 fireworks enjoyed from the deck of the lake home he built in Clear Lake.

He is survived by his wife, Mary Anne Coady, of Ames; a sister, Maurine Reis, of Burlington; his ten children, Suzanne (Jim) Rock, of Ames, Michelle (Susan Sullivan) Coady, of Minneapolis, Daniel (Ann) Coady, of Ankeny., Kayleen(Bob) Catus, of Ames, Linda(Mark) Vanderpoel, of Chicago, Sheila Coady, of Ames, Sam Coady, of Chicago, Ellen Coady, of Ames, Amy (Tom) Courneya, of Ames, Anne (Mark) Evans, of St. Louis; sixteen grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

Larry was preceded in death by his parents, Samuel and Josephine Coady.

As a show of sympathy, the family would like to suggest that contributions be made in his name to St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church.


Tribute by David C. Jiles, Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering department.

Larry Coady (1933-2013)
Larry Coady was an alumni, a veteran, an engineer, a teacher, and a provider of homes.

Coady was born in 1933 in Ottumwa to parents Samuel and Josephine Coady.  After graduating high school, Coady attended Iowa State for a short time, but soon enlisted in the Navy.  Coady did naval intelligence work in Japan for four years during the Korean War.  When he was returned from the war, he worked at a meat packing plant before landing a job at a TV station.  During this time, he married Mary Anne Gannon in 1956.  They started a family together.

Eventually, Coady returned to Iowa State, graduating in 1959 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. After a few years working at Collins Radio Co. in Cedar Rapids, Coady returned again to Iowa State, earning his master’s in 1963 and PhD in 1965. Coady was a member of the ISU faculty for thirty years as an associate professor of electrical engineering. He retired in 1992.
Coady didn’t just teach students at Iowa State, he provided many of them with places to live. Coady founded the property management company Coady Enterprises in 1997, having bought and managed student rental properties over his years at Iowa State. Coady Enterprises has built two large scale residential complexes, one finished when he first started his company, the second completed last summer. Coady oversaw the construction personally.


May 2013 Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Larry Coady was an alum, a veteran, an engineer, a teacher, a provider of homes, a husband, and a father. He died March 7 in his Ames home. He was 80.

Coady was born in 1933 in Ottumwa to parents Samuel and Josephine Coady. After graduating high school, Coady attended Iowa State for a short time, but soon enlisted in the Navy. Coady did naval intelligence work in Japan for four years during the Korean War. When he returned from the war, he worked at a meat packing plant before landing a job at a TV station. During this time, he married Mary Anne Gannon in 1956. They started a family together.

Eventually, Coady returned to Iowa State, graduating in 1959 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. After a few years working at Collins Radio Co. in Cedar Rapids, Coady returned again to Iowa State, earning his master’s in 1963 and PhD in 1965. Coady was a member of the ISU faculty for thirty years as an associate professor of electrical engineering. He retired in 1992.

Coady didn’t just teach students at Iowa State, he provided many of them with places to live. Coady founded the property management company Coady Enterprises in 1997, having bought and managed student rental properties over his years at Iowa State. Coady Enterprises has built two large scale residential complexes, one finished when he first started his company, the second completed last summer. Coady oversaw the construction personally.

Coady is remembered for his sense of humor, intellect, and engaging personality. He greatly understood the value of education. Five of his ten children are also ISU alumni. Coady worked to make life better not just for his family, but for his community. In his free time, he enjoyed waterskiing, which he did from the lake home he built in Clear Lake, Iowa. He and his family and friends enjoyed traditional summer barbecues and Independence Day fireworks at that lake house. He was a man of science and industry, but he also had a rich spiritual life. He joined St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church upon moving to Ames.

Larry Coady is survived by his wife, Mary Anne Coady, a nurse; his sister, Maurine Reis; his ten children, Suzanne Rock, Michelle Coady, Daniel Coady, Kayleen Catus, Linda Vanderpoel, Sheila Coady, Sam Coady, Ellen Coady, Amy Courneya, Ann Evans; sixteen grandchildren, and four great grandchildren.


COX, Charles Philip

Charles Philip Cox, Iowa State University Statistics Professor Emeritus, born December 15, 1919, of Linton, Derbyshire, England died June 10, 2012 at Bethany Manor, Story City, Iowa. He was predeceased by his parents, Huldah and Herbert Cox; brother, Joseph Cox; and two sisters, Kathleen and Muriel Cox. Survivors include his sister-in-law, Jenny Cox and three nephews, Peter, Christopher, and Simon Cox all of England.


DAVIS, Kenneth
Kenneth L. Davis, 87, of Ames, died Monday March 25, 2013 at the VA Center in Des Moines. A celebration of life memorial service will be 10 a.m. Friday, April 12, 2013, at Ascension Lutheran Church, 2400 Bloomington Road, Ames. Burial will be in Iowa Veterans Cemetery in Van Meter following the service.

Kenneth was born April 22, 1925, in Ames, the son of Lee Roy and Gertrude Davis. He graduated from Ames High School. He was a WWII veteran serving in the Marine Corps. He married Laurene Myers Taylor on Oct. 4, 1968, in Ames. Kenny worked at Iowa State University in the maintenance department, retiring in 1988. He was a member of Ascension Lutheran Church in Ames, Ames American Legion Post #37, and Moose Lodge #520. He enjoyed golf and time with his family.


DEKOVIC, Charles, Jr.
Charles William DeKovic, Jr. age 82, of Ames died January 11, in Madrid, IA. A gathering of friends and family will be held 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday, January 13, at Grandon Funeral and Cremation Care at 414 Lincoln Way in Ames. Burial will be at the Iowa State University Cemetery.

Chuck was born April 8, 1930, in Chicago, Illinois the son of Charles and Lillian (Hell) DeKovic. Chuck attended Crane Technical High School in Chicago, then enlisted in the US Marine Corp after high school in 1948. He served during the Korean Conflict until 1953. On June 11, 1955 he married Elaine Ann Pavlak in Chicago where they lived until he graduated from Illinois Institute of Technology in 1958 with a degree in Architecture. The family then moved to Ames, Iowa, where he accepted an engineering graphics position at Iowa State University. His career path further led him to Rudi & DeKovic Architects, Cal State Hayward, Buena Vista University in Storm Lake, Iowa, and he returned to complete his career at Iowa State University in facilities management.

Chuck served the Ames community on several boards which included Youth and Shelter Services, and St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church. He served as a volunteer at Israel Family Hospice House, and dedicated time as a Court Appointed Special Advocate for area youth.

Chuck is survived by his wife Elaine Ann DeKovic of Ames, his children: Mark (Sue) DeKovic of Minneapolis, MN; Charles III (Sara) DeKovic of Ames, Jay DeKovic of Fraser Valley, CO; Lauren and (Martin) Fenimore of Ames, Julie DeKovic of Houston, TX; Elizabeth Catanesi of Madera, CA, eight grandsons, and two great-grandsons.

Chuck is preceded in death by his parents and brother, Eugene DeKovic of Napa Valley, CA.


DREESZEN, Emmett
Emmett Dreeszen 100, of Ames passed away March 13, at Northcrest Health Care Center in Ames. Emmett was born on Nov. 10, 1912, on a farm near Pierson. His parents were Rudolph J. and Louise (Bruene) Dreeszen. His given name was Woodrow Emmett, but he was known as Emmett through his lifetime as his parents feared he would be known as “Woody.”

Emmett was christened at Rock Branch, a rural church near Pierson. When he was three-years-old, the family moved to a farm near Correctionville where he entered country school. When he was 6, the family moved to a farm near Cushing where Emmett finished country school and graduated from Cushing High School in 1928 at the age of 15.

Emmett attended Wartburg College for three years, and then graduated from what was then Iowa State College in Ames in 1932. He taught country school in Ida County from 1935-37, was a high school principal and coach at Grand Meadow High School in Cherokee County and was a high school principal and coach at Early from 1937-42.

It was while teaching at Early that he married Lois Royer, of Kingsley. Two sons, Lynn A. and Steven K., were born there. In 1942, the family moved to Des Moines. Emmett taught science at Callanan Junior High School until 1944, when he accepted a commission as an officer in the U.S. Navy. He was assigned to the Manhattan Project at Oak Ridge, Tenn. While living in Oak Ridge, a daughter, Dee A., was born in 1948.

In 1948, Emmett accepted a position as information manager in the Ames Laboratory at Iowa State College. He held this position until he retired in 1978. In 1956, a third son, Bryce W., was born.

From 1994 until his death he and Lois lived at the Northcrest Retirement Community in Ames.
He had a lifelong interest in sports, as both a participant and spectator. He was an avid bowler and golfed into his 90s. In 2002, he and Lois were recognized for having been season ticket holders for football and basketball at Iowa State for 54 years.

He was a 60-year member of the Ames Lions Club and received the Monarch Award from Lions Clubs International. He served for a number of years in the Broken Arrow Council of the Boy Scouts of America and received the Silver Beaver Award.

He participated in the work of his church, Collegiate United Methodist Church and Wesley Foundation, as a Sunday School teacher and participant on various committees.

Emmett will be remembered by his family for his unfailing generosity, positive attitude, and his “Mr. Fix-it” abilities. He and Lois enjoyed playing cards and travel, having visited many places in the world as members of the Friendship Force.

He is survived by two sons, Steve (Donna) of Revere, Mass. and Bryce (Paula) of Interlochen, Mich.; one daughter, Dee, of Ames, and one daughter-in-law, Jane, of Scotts Valley, Calif.; 11 grandchildren and step-grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and one sister, Velma Goettsch, of Holstein.

He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Lois in 2011; son, Lynn; daughter, Shelley Jane, who died in infancy; brothers, Wesley and Elvie; and sister, Ina Volkert.

A memorial service will be Saturday, April 6, at 10 a.m. at Northcrest Community.

Memorial contributions should be directed to the G.S. Nichols Scholarship Fund, c/o Collegiate United Methodist Church, 2622 Lincoln Way, Ames, IA, 50014.


DUTTON, Howard C.
September 3, 1944 - November 17, 2012

© 2014 Iowa State University Alumni Association. All rights reserved.