Iowa State University Alumni Association
 

Memorial Day 2016

Download PDF of 2016 ceremony presentation

James “Jim” M. Aldrich

June 11, 1926 – July 5, 2015

James "Jim" M. Aldrich, 68, of the Iowa Veterans Home, formerly of Ames, Iowa, died Sunday, July 5, 2015 at the Marshalltown Hospital.

Jim was born December 2, 1946 at White Oak, Iowa, the son of Charles and June (Talbert) Aldrich. He served in the Navy during the Vietnam War. Jim was a custodian at Iowa State University and retired in 2008.

Jim is survived by his wife, M. Christine Aldrich of Ames, Iowa; three step-sons; one step-daughter; four children he helped raise; one brother; four sisters; and numerous nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents; five brothers; and one sister.

Visitation will be 1:00 - 2:00 PM Thursday at the Bacon Funeral Home in Maxwell, Iowa.

Memorial services will be at 2:00 PM Thursday at the Bacon Funeral Home in Maxwell.

Inurnment with Military Honors will be at the Peoria Cemetery near Maxwell.

In lieu of flowers: memorials may be made to the James Aldrich Memorial Fund.

The Bacon Funeral Home in Maxwell is handling the arrangements.


E. Robert “Bob” Baumann

May 12, 1921 – October 23, 2015

Dr. E. Robert "Bob" Baumann, 94, of Ames died October 23, 2015, at Green Hills Retirement Community. Friends are invited to join the family at Green Hills Retirement Center from 2:00-4:00 p.m. on Friday October 30th to celebrate his life. A private burial will take place at Iowa State University Cemetery.

Bob was born on May 12, 1921 in Rochester, New York, to John and Lillie (Roth) Baumann. He received a B.S. in Civil Engineering at the University of Michigan in 1944. He earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Sanitary Engineering at the University of Illinois, interrupting his education to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II. Bob met Mary Massey and the couple married on June 15, 1946. In 1953, Bob accepted a position with Iowa State University, tasked with building a program in Environmental Engineering. In 1959-60, Bob served as a National Science Foundation Faculty Fellow at the University of Durham, Kings College, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England. He was named Anson Marston Distinguished Professor of Engineering in 1971. He retired from ISU in 1991. He continued his career as a consulting engineer at Bolton and Menk, Inc. There he provided technical support, project conceptual review, and expert forensic services, retiring in 2011 at age 90.

Over the years, Bob has written over 360 publications in various books, magazines, and journals. He was elected a member of the Iowa State Research Foundation and also the Iowa State Board of Health. In 1977, he was selected to present the commencement address at Iowa State. Bob was a member of the Iowa Water Works Association and the past president of many organizations including the National Society of Professional Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors, Iowa Conference, and the American Association of University Professors. Bob joined the Rotary Club in June, 1963, making him a 52-year member.

Bob is survived by Mary, his beloved wife of 69 years, daughter, Betsy Baumann of Ames, son, Philip (Patti) Baumann of Moorhead, MN, grandchildren Jessica (David) Kluck of Moorhead, MN and Timothy (Elli) Laurila of Keller, TX, great-grandchildren Ava and Soren Kluck, Samuel and Henry Laurila.

He was preceded in death by his parents, brother John, sister Ruth, 2 nephews, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Massey, and a great-granddaughter, Sophia Susan Laurila. In lieu of flowers memorials may be directed to Youth & Shelter Services, Ames.

Iowa State remembers environmental engineering pioneer Bob Baumann
The Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering at Iowa State University celebrates the life of E. Robert “Bob” Baumann – international educator, engineer and pioneer of Iowa State’s environmental engineering program. He died in Ames on Oct. 23, 2015, at age 94.

Baumann, Anson Marston Distinguished Professor Emeritus in civil and construction engineering, brought environmental engineering to Iowa State in 1953. He was one of only three U.S. environmental engineering doctoral graduates at the time, establishing what would become an exceptional 38-year career in teaching, research, and service. He retired in 1991, 12 years before the Department of Civil and Construction Engineering was renamed the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering.

“My dad’s greatest legacy is the immense impact he had on students,” said Betsy Baumann, Bob Baumann’s daughter and retired project manager at Iowa State’s Institute for Social and Behavioral Research (now Survey Research Services in the Center for Survey Statistics and Methodology). “When he taught or advised, he combined technical aspects with real human connections.”

Bob built an international network of former students – from Israel, Hungary, and Turkey, many other countries – whom he kept in contact for years and decades after they graduated.

Iowa State archive papers noted that Baumann interviewed for associate professor with then-Iowa State President James Hilton on Hilton’s first day – July 1, 1953. Upon hiring Baumann two months later, Hilton stated: “We don’t know what you will need to develop this new, important field of environmental engineering, but we will depend on you and will support you.”

Baumann’s first Iowa State research endeavor came at a crucial time in Iowa’s history. In 1953 the state of Iowa faced a major swine epidemic – vesicular exanthema – killing millions of swine that year. He led a U.S. Public Health Service project, in coordination with Iowa State’s veterinary microbiology program, to establish criteria for killing swine disease organisms in garbage. His research led to the ban of uncooked garbage fed to swine, which also led to reduced trichinosis (disease caused by eating uncooked meat) risks for people.

“My dad took a lot of joy in new things, and his timing was extremely lucky,” Betsy said.

Jack Cleasby, Anson Marston Distinguished Professor Emeritus in civil and construction engineering and National Academy of Engineering member, joined the department as an instructor and became one of Baumann’s first doctoral students in 1954. “Bob was remarkably successful in seeking graduate student support, gaining financial support from industry, state government and federal government sources,” Cleasby said. “All of this led to recognition that Iowa State had one of the leading environmental engineering programs in the country.” Cleasby retired in 1993.

The late Paul Morgan was a former civil engineering professor, associate dean in engineering, and one of Baumann’s first master’s students. He joined Baumann and Cleasby to build Iowa State’s sanitary engineering program. Iowa State transitioned sanitary engineering to environmental engineering in the 1980’s. Morgan died in 2013.

Baumann embarked on countless more research water and wastewater treatment projects, which had local and international impacts. As Baumann established countless partnerships with government, academia and industry, he garnered accolades from the American Water Works Association, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the Filtration Society of Great Britain, the Iowa Engineering Society, Sigma Xi (the Scientific Research Society), the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors, and the American Chemical Society.

Baumann served on and led many national and international societies throughout his Iowa State tenure, including top roles at the National Society of Professional Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers Iowa Section, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the American Filtration and Separation Society, the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (also a founding member), the Iowa Conference, and the American Association of University Professors. He also was a member of the Iowa State Research Foundation, the Iowa State Board of Health, and the Iowa Water Works Association. From 1959 to 1960 he was a National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellow at Durham University in Newcastle-on-Tyne, England.

In November 1977 he delivered the Iowa State University Commencement address, giving a speech entitled “Facing Future Challenges.”

Public Works Magazine featured Baumann on the cover of its December 1979 issue, stating that he was “a major contributor to environmental engineering education and practice.”

Baumann earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering at the University of Michigan in 1944. He served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers during World War II before earning bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees in sanitary engineering from the University of Illinois. Baumann taught and conducted research there from 1946 to 1953. He married Mary Massey in 1946, and they raised two children, Philip and Betsy, in Ames. Betsy was born in Urbana, Ill., in 1948, and Philip was born in Ames in 1953.

Baumann and his family have reflected hard work and talents with Iowa State contributions. They established six funds throughout the university, including the Dr. Robert R. and Alma Schumacher Massey Scholarship in liberal arts and sciences, the Dr. Philip R. Baumann Graduate Scholarship in political science, the Betsy L. Baumann Graduate Scholarship for African-American psychology students, the Baumann/Cleasby/Dague Professorship in Environmental Engineering, the Mary Massey Baumann Psychology and Music Scholarships, and the E. Robert Baumann Scholarship for graduate students in environmental engineering.

“My dad brought us up to be independent and socially intelligent,” Betsy said. “We feel his absence at the dinner table – a place where we caught up with current issues and life.”


Ralph Edward Beach

September 6, 1932 – July 13, 2015

Ralph Beach (82), passed away at the Hawkeye Care Center (Villa Del Sol) in Marshalltown, Iowa, on July 13th, 2015. No services are planned at this time. Memorial contributions can be made to Iowa River Hospice House in Marshalltown. For more information or to send a condolence; please visit www.mitchellfh.com or call 641-844-1234. Mitchell Family Funeral Home is caring for Ralph and his family.

Ralph Edward Beach was born on September 6th, 1932, to Floyd and Margaret (Naumann) Beach. He was raised and educated in the Marshall County area, graduating from Marshalltown High School. After graduation, Ralph served his country for four years in the United States Airforce. On March 28th, 1958, Ralph and Joann Fisher were united in marriage in Marshalltown at a local parsonage. In life, Ralph worked for Marshall Manufacturing for 32 years. He later worked for Iowa State University, running the stockrooms and taking inventory, until his retirement in 2005.

Ralph loved the Iowa State Fair, Airplanes, taking vacations in the Yellowstone mountains, westerns, raising animals and working on the family homestead for over 40 years. The family was always proud of his work ethic and his ability to plan and execute whatever Ralph set his mind to. Be it be rewiring a house or building one from the ground up. His initiative and drive will be missed by his loving family.

Left to cherish his memory is his wife; Joann Beach, children; Christy (Mark) Gummert, grandchildren; Joseph, Christopher, Jeremiah, James and four great-grandchildren.

In death, Ralph rejoins his parents; Floyd and Margaret Beach, Daughter; Becky Jo Beach, and sister; Dorine.

Ralph Edward Beach
Tribute by his wife, Joann Beach

My husband Ralph – 37 years of marriage

Ralph’s job was a Storekeeper III.

Ralph loved going out west to the mountains on vacation and the Iowa State Fair. He enjoyed working at I.S.U. He never complained. He was a great person. I miss him and will love him forever.


Robert William Bernard

September 15, 1935 – February 11, 2016

Robert William Bernard, 80, a long-term Ames resident and retired professor of French and Italian at Iowa State University, died Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, at Green Hills Health Care Center in Ames, IA.

Robert was born Sept. 15, 1935 in Detroit, MI, and was the only child of Kathleen and Harry Bernard, who were born in Trenton, Ontario. During his childhood, his father’s work took the family to many places to live, including Younkers, NY, Memphis, TN, and St. Paul, MN. Robert attended high school in St. Paul. He graduated from the University of St. Thomas, also in St. Paul, where he discovered his academic love of French literature. Robert completed his graduate work (Masters and Ph.D.) at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, with his dissertation on Christine de Pizan, a Fifteenth Century French medieval author. He settled in Ames in 1965 when he became an Iowa State University faculty member in the Department of Foreign Languages.

He raised two sons in Ames from his first marriage, Christopher and Peter. As a devoted son to his mother, he shared his home with her for eight years until she died in December of 1995. In January of 1996, Robert met his second wife, Julie Minkler, who was born and raised in Athens, Greece, and immigrated to the United States in 1974. Their new family also included Julie’s son, Stefan Minkler.

Robert’s passions ranged from his research and scholarship in French Literature and Film, as well as Classic American Cinema, from silent films through the 1960s. He also loved Italian language and culture, particularly focusing on 1950s cinema, as well as its extraordinary cuisine. With Julie, their mutual passions for international travel took them abroad many times. Over the years, through their many visits to Greece, they kept close ties to Julie’s cousins, Maria and Anna Tsivakou, and close friends, including Nick Zahariadis.

Robert was a long-term and contributing member of St. Thomas Aquinas Church. The last eleven months of his life, he spent at Green Hills Health Care Center, where he was cared with compassion.

He is survived by two sons, Christopher (Christine) Bernard, a Technology Executive in Microsoft, in Elmhurst, Ill; Peter Bernard, Lieutenant Commander in the US Navy (currently in Bahrain); one step-son, Stefan Minkler of Ames, who shares Bob’s passion for cinema; and his loving grandchildren, Benjamin, Ellie, and Erin.

Robert was preceded in death by his parents.


Robert F. (Bob) Bernhardt

May 6, 1920 – April 5, 2016

Robert F. (Bob) Bernhardt, 95, of Clarion passed away Tuesday, April 5, 2016 at the Iowa Specialty Hospital in Clarion.

A Mass of Christian Burial for Robert Bernhardt will be held at 2:00 PM on Friday, April 8, 2016 at St. John’s Catholic Church, 608 2nd Avenue North East in Clarion, with Reverend Jerry Blake officiating. Burial will be held at Evergreen Cemetery in Clarion.

Visitation will be held from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM, with a rosary beginning at 3:45 PM on Thursday, April 7, 2016 at Ewing Funeral Home, 1801 Central Avenue East in Clarion, and will continue one hour prior to services at the church on Friday.

Bob was born on May 6, 1920. He was the oldest of six children born to Fred and Isabel (Kallmer) Bernhardt.

Bob was raised on family farms near Odebolt and Schaller, IA. He attended country school for eight years and graduated from Schaller in 1937.

Following high school Bob attended Iowa State College. His education was interrupted by World War II. He served as a Navy pilot on anti-submarine patrol for four years and was discharged in October, 1945.

After being discharged from the Navy, Bob married his high school sweetheart, Lois Kevan. Bob and Lois moved back to Iowa where he finished his BS degree in Agriculture at Iowa State College. Following graduation from ISU, Bob and Lois operated a dairy and hog farm near Harmony, MN. While on the farm Bob served on the Farm Bureau board, Fair board and Clerk of School District. Together Bob and Lois organized a 4-H Club in the township.

Bob was a very devout member of the Catholic Church. As a member of St. John’s in Clarion, he served six years on Church Council and twenty-five years as Lector and Eucharistic Minister. He delivered communion to homebound members and enjoyed being a volunteer at Iowa Specialty Hospital until his recent health decline at age 95.

Bob and his family moved to Clarion in 1962 where Bob served as a 4-H Youth worker and later as County Extension Director for 23 years. One of the fringe benefits of that job was getting to know so many people in Wright County.

Bob will be remembered by his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren for the love he gave them and the faith he shared with them.

To this union were born four children – Jeanne (Gary) Watts of Riceville, IA, Judy (the late Phil Kirstein) of Clarion, IA, Ken (Mari) Bernhardt of Clarion, IA and Kevin (Daneen) Bernhardt of Platteville, WI.

Bob is survived by thirteen grandchildren – Deana (Sam) Hill, Dana Watts (friend Dan) and Heather Watts; Kent (Kelly) Kirstein, Dean (Abby) Kirstein and Cole (Jen) Kirstein; Jennifer (Troy) Askelsen, Rhonda (Chett) Ray and Mark (Emily) Bernhardt; Joshua, Jacob, Ethan, and Maria Bernhardt. Also to this loving family, seventeen great grandchildren were added so far.  Bob is also survived by one sister – Arlene Grundmeier of Storm Lake, IA, two brothers – Rich (Margie) Bernhardt of Letitz, PA and Don (Norma) of Florrisant, MO and numerous nieces and nephews.

Bob was preceded in death by his wife Lois, parents, son-in-law Phil, two brothers, one brother-in-law and one sister-in law.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the Iowa Specialty Hospital Foundation.

Robert F. (Bob) Bernhardt
Tribute by his son, Kevin Bernhardt

Bob was a graduate of Dairy Science from Iowa State College in 1947 after interrupting his college education for service in the Navy in WWII.  Following several years in dairy farming, Bob began his career with ISU Extension in 1962 until his retirement in 1983.  His contributions to agriculture in Wright County are countless from his expertise in hail damage assessment to management of the Wright County fair.  No contribution was greater, however, than the personal friendships with farmers, community members, and his Extension family as evidenced by the out-pouring of visitors to his wake and the hundreds of cards and emails from near and far.  In one of his last lucid moments he asked what the weather was like.  Upon hearing that it was cold and rainy, he wrinkled his nose and said, “Too early to plant anyway!”


Arlene Marie Buechler

July 16, 1920 – March 10, 2016

Arlene Buechler, 95, passed away Thursday, March 10, 2016, at Mill Pond Retirement Community in Ankeny. Memorial services will be held at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 19, 2016, at Ankeny Funeral Home with burial to follow at Linwood Park Cemetery in Boone, Iowa.

Arlene Marie Cooper was born in Boone County, Iowa on July 16, 1920 to Frank and Blanche (Oler) Cooper. She grew up on their farm and attended all 12 grades at Jordan Consolidated School in Jordan, Iowa, graduating in 1938. She was active in many school and church activities playing the piano, singing and speaking for many events, including winning the State of Iowa Oratory Contest one year. Arlene was also busy with 4-H club for many years, being Boone County President and the outstanding County member another year.

Arlene was a member of the Jordan Presbyterian Church where she married Marvin N. Buechler in 1940. After their marriage they moved to Wichita, Kansas where they both were employed at Boeing Aircraft during World War II.

Following the war they returned to Boone, Iowa and she helped Marvin farm for 19 years. Later, they moved to Ames, Iowa and she was employed and retired from Iowa State University in the ROTC department as secretary to the Army and Air Force personnel.

In later years she lived in Urbandale, Iowa, Mesa, Arizona and Ankeny, Iowa; enjoying her retirement with traveling on many trips with her husband. Arlene was a member of the First Baptist Church in Boone, Iowa, Centennial Culture Club and Magi Chapter #139, Order of the Eastern Star, both in Boone.

Arlene is preceded in death by her husband of 72 years, Marvin; her parents, a sister, Mabel and two brothers, Earl and Marvin.

Survivors include her son, Stan (Georgiann) Buechler of Ankeny; daughter, Pam (Ron) Tesdell of Ankeny; four grandchildren, Pete Buechler of Des Moines, Erin Buechler of Des Moines, Matt (Amy) Tesdell, and Mike (Kim) Tesdell also of Des Moines; and seven great-grandchildren.


Hobart Zenas Cammack Jr.

November 2, 1925 – December 28, 2014

Hobart Zenas Cammack, 89, of Overland Park, KS passed away peacefully December 28th, 2014 at Delmar Gardens of Lenexa. A graveside service will be held 11am, Saturday, January 3rd in the mausoleum at Johnson County Funeral Chapel and Memorial Gardens, 11200 Metcalf Ave, Overland Park, KS.

Hobart was born November 2, 1925 in Newton, IA and was raised there. He was in Naval Pre-flight 1944 -1945. He earned an undergraduate and doctoral degrees in Chemical Engineering from Iowa State University. He held a number of positions throughout the country in engineering industry. He enjoyed many and various interests such as: traveling, trains, music, nature, sports and reading, but above all he loved his time with family.

He was preceded in death by his parents and brother, George William Cammack. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Jane (Pyle); daughter, Susan Estelle Cammack; son, Robert Carey Cammack; granddaughters, Gloria (Jordan) Soliz and Katy Joseph; grandson, Ben (Emily) Unglesbee and four great grandchildren.


Lenita Bird (Lee) Jordan Carstens

January 27, 1927 – February 24, 2016

Lenita Bird (Lee) Jordan Carstens died on February 24, 2016 at age 92. She was the beloved wife of Dr. Robert L. (Sam) Carstens.

Lenita Bird was born in Jefferson, Greene County, Iowa on January 27, 1924 to Zona and Henry Heath. Her younger brother, Warren, preceded her in death in 1971. They enjoyed a wonderful, rich childhood on the farm and then in Jefferson where they lived on the farm and in the house her grandfather had homesteaded and built. After high school graduation, she moved to Des Moines to attend American Institute of Business. There, amidst classes and typing competitions, she met Marshall Wesley (Wes) Jordan. They married in March 1945 while he was serving in the Navy. They moved to Ames in 1956, raised their family and were an active part of the community the rest of their lives. Wes died in 1981.

Lenita married Dr. Robert L. (Sam) Carstens in 1995. They have enjoyed a delightful, fulfilling, active life together for 21 years. They shared a love of traveling, time spent at their retreat at Rock Creek Lake, faith, ISU sports, and they appreciated every day together.

Her son, Craig Henry Jordan (Kim), preceded her in death in 1994. She is survived by her husband; daughter, Janis Lee Coss (Dick) of Davis, Calif.; son, Ronald Bruce Jordan (Kyla) of Phoenix, Ariz. and Wapati, Wyo.; five grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and her niece and nephew.

Lenita enjoyed a wide variety of activities and interests throughout her life. She worked 19 years at the Registrar's Office at Iowa State University. She had a lifetime of activity supporting the lives and causes she valued. But of two causes she was fiercely proud. The first was her heritage. Her family played a significant role in the development of Jefferson and Greene County. She continued to support scholarships at Jefferson schools, supported the historical museum with family artifacts and cash donations, edited and compiled an annual newsletter for members of her high school class, and maintained friendships. She excelled at finding historical connections between people in central Iowa that tied them back to acquaintances or family of past generations.

The second cause Lenita focused on was veterans. She and Sam flew a flag daily in honor of the many veterans in both their families. She was exceptionally proud of Sam and they enjoyed their annual trip to Branson for Veterans Homecoming activities. They also enjoyed years of attending of Sam's 163rd Engineer Battalion annual reunion in Tennessee. She provided special flowers to the church chancel annually for Veterans Day.

Lenita will also be remembered for her Vitamin L, as she called it - L for Laughter. She often had a riddle or joke of the day that would universally make people smile (or groan and then smile!). She is already missed by staff at North Grand Shopping Center where she shared Vitamin L during every day exercise walks.

Those wishing to make a memorial donation are asked to consider Central Iowa Mental Health, Camp Courageous, Ames Public Library or First United Methodist Church.

The family would like to thank the staff of Riverside North, Mary Greeley Hospital, and First United Methodist Church for assistance, patience, and loving care.


Irvin “Chris” C. Christiansen

June 11, 1926 – June 30, 2015

Irvin “Chris” Christiansen was born June 11, 1926 to Charles H. and Julia C. (Larson) Christiansen in Story City, Iowa. Chris and Josephine Foster were married July 11, 1958 in Gilbert. He owned and worked a farm for 40 years and for 35 years worked at the Iowa State University Athletic Ticket Office. He enjoyed fishing on German Lake in Minnesota, square dancing and golfing with friends. With Chris family always came first. He was loved for his easy going manner, ability make people laugh and his unassuming smile.

Chris passed away at 89 years of age on June 30, 2015 at the Polk City Nursing and Rehab Center in Polk City.

Chris is survived by his wife, Josephine Christiansen of Slater; his daughter, Beth Christiansen of Evanston, IL; his nieces, Dorothy Bartleson and Susan Lewerke; and his nephews, Richard Christiansen and David Loney.

He was preceded in death by his parents; and three brothers, Charles W. Christiansen, John R. Christiansen and Kenneth P. Christiansen.


Ella Adelena Clark

June 1, 1915 – July 25, 2011

Ella Adelena (Sampson) Clark was born June 1, 1915, in Henry County, Iowa, the daughter of James F. and Mary Grace (Leland) Sampson, and passed away July 25, 2011, in Higginsville, Missouri, at the age of 96.

She married John S. Clark of Baldwin, Iowa, on October 2, 1955. He preceded her in death in 1988. Adelena was a Home Economist for the Iowa State Extension Service, retiring in 1976. She was a member of the Osage Hills Community of Christ Church, 27503 East Blue Mills Road, Sibley, Missouri, 64088, where she served as an Elder. She was also a member of the Kansas Society of Mayflower Descendants, the Iowa State Alumni Association and the Lamoni Iowa Mite Society.

Survivors include her daughter and son-in-law, Joyce and Randy Martin of Lexington, MO; three brothers, James L. Sampson of Springfield, MO, Robert B. Sampson of Mt. Pleasant, IA, and Lloyd H. Sampson of Hood River, OR; a sister, Gladys A. Cox of Austin, TX; four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by a step-son, John E. Clark and two sisters, Grace M. Kunz and Ruth M. Holland.

Memorial Funeral Services for Adelena will be held Saturday, August 20, 2011, at the Church in Sibley, Missouri, beginning at 4 p.m., with visitation 1 hour prior to the service at the church. Church Elder Doris Thompson will officiate.

Memorial contributions for Adelena may be sent to Village Hospice, 1016 Main Street, Lexington, MO 64067.


Tracy Larsen Clark Sr.

October 2, 1930 – September 10, 2015

Dr. Tracy Larsen Clark Sr., DVM, 84, of Ames passed away peacefully Thursday, September 10, 2015, at Walnut Ridge Senior Living in Clive.

Tracy was born October 2, 1930, in Woodville, Nebraska to James and Grayce (Larsen) Clark. He graduated from St. Edward High School in 1947, and was united in marriage to Kay Kimmel on September 28, 1954, in Lincoln, Nebraska. Tracy served in the United States Navy and in 1960, graduated from Kansas State College of Veterinary Medicine. Tracy and Kay made their home in Ames where he worked for Iowa State University as a Professor of Veterinary Medicine, specializing in large animals, retiring in 1993. He enjoyed square and round dancing, volunteering at Reiman Gardens and supporting Iowa State, traveling and spending time with his family.

Tracy is survived by his wife of 61 years, Kay of Ames; his sons: Tracy (Mary) Clark Jr. of Playa del Rey, California, Ken (Julie) Clark of Waukee and Tom (Karleen) Clark of Glenwood Springs, Colorado; his daughter, Chris (Perry) Hadaway of Cambridge; nine grandchildren: Jared Clark, Aleah (Shawn) Siefkas, Chad Hadaway, David (Jessica) Clark, Tracy Clark III, Tony Hadaway, Chelsey Clark, Anna (Casey) Frey and Alex Clark; and his sister, Nancy (Gene) McPherson of Indianapolis, Indiana.

Tracy was preceded in death by his parents; and his brother, Jim Clark.

Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Saturday, September 19, at Bacon Funeral Home in Nevada (1418 Fawcett Parkway) and family will greet friends 10-11 a.m. prior to the funeral. Following services, cremation will take place.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Iowa State College of Veterinary Medicine at Iowa State University in memory of Tracy Clark Sr.

Tracy Larson Clark Sr.
Tribute by his former student and colleague, Gary Osweiler

Dr. Clark was my instructor in Veterinary Clinics, specializing in large animal reproductive medicine. I also knew him as a colleague in the veterinary faculty.

Tracy was an excellent instructor; knowledgeable, patient with animals and always willing to spend extra time with students who needed help.

I think no one better defines the terms "gentleman" and "scholar" than Tracy Clark - always well prepared, pleasant, good humored and happy to do what was best for students. It was a blessing to have known him.


Mary E. Cochran

March 8, 1924 – September 3, 2015

Mary E. Cochran, 91, of Fort Madison and formerly of Fairfield, passed away at 12:41 p.m. on Sept. 3, 2015 at The Madison.

She was born on March 8, 1924 in Omaha, Neb., to William and Rhoda Henry Nash. Mary was adopted at age 5 by Roscoe and Audrey McCleary.

She grew up in Jefferson County. She graduated from Fairfield High School in 1940 and attended Parsons College. On Feb. 21, 1946 she married Harold C. Cochran at the United Methodist Church in Fairfield.

Mary and Harold were involved with farming from 1946-1956 and they moved to Fairfield in 1956 where she was an office employee at Iowa Malleable Iron Company, Jefferson County Hospital and Parson College. Mary taught Sunday School and held offices with the PTA and American Legion before they moved to Ames in 1967. Mary worked at Iowa State University from 1967-1998 in the offices of Entomology, Biology and Animal Science. She was a member of the Collegiate United Methodist Church and a volunteer with American Red Cross.

Survivors include a son, Randy Cochran of Galesburg, Ill.; a daughter in law, Kathie Cochran of Fort Madison; six grandchildren; five great grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; a son, Alan Cochran; one sister and one brother.


Nancy Ruth Coinman

December 12, 1944 – July 6, 2015

Nancy Ruth Coinman died on Monday, July 6, 2015, at her home in Mimbres, New Mexico. Nancy Ruth (Braun Arvidson) Coinman was born on Dec. 12, 1944, in St Paul, Minnesota, to Ruth Ann (Braun) Arvidson and Murray David Braun. Nancy is survived by siblings William Arvidson (Patricia), Gloria Felts (Rick), Edward Arvidson (Denise), Cynthia Marquez, and Elizabeth Direen (Alan). Nancy was preceded in death by mother Ruth (1989), father Murray (1944), adoptive father Raymond Arvidson (2012) and brother Frederick Arvidson (1999). Nancy moved to Albuquerque In 1950, where she attended St. Mary's, Holy Ghost, Wilson Junior High and Highland High. Nancy graduated from HHS in 1962 and from New Mexico State University in 1966. In 1967, Nancy married Mike Coinman. Mike was commissioned in the U.S. Navy, became a pilot, but died in an aviation accident in 1969. Nancy stayed in California, where she taught school and traveled often to Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America. Her traveling fueled a fascination in cultural anthropology that led her to obtain a master's and a doctorate in anthropology from Arizona State University. Nancy taught at Tulsa University and then in 1993 was hired by Iowa State University, where she taught anthropology and archaeology and led field archaeology research in Jordan during several summers. Nancy retired in 2009 and moved to Mimbres, New Mexico, where she became active in the local archaeology scene and in community service. After a three-year struggle with cancer, with compassionate care from the New Mexico Cancer Center in Silver City, assistance from neighbors and siblings, she was able to stay in her beloved home in Mimbres. In lieu flowers, donations may be made to Mimbres Health Action League or the Grant County Archaeology Society. Cremation has taken place at Terrazas Crematory. Arrangements are with Terrazas Funeral Chapels and Crematory "Trusted care for the ones you love" ~ 575-537-0777. To send condolences, visit www.terrazasfuneralchapel.com.

Nancy Ruth Coinman
Tribute by her brother, Bill Arvidson

Our mother, Ruth Ann Dittrich, was a farm girl from Plainview, Minnesota.  Our father, Murray Braun, was a river boy from Wabasha.  Murray joined the Army, went to Officer Candidate School and married Ruth Ann in 1942. In 1944, Second Lieutenant Murray Braun joined the 317th Regiment in France.  Murray & his regiment fought across the Moselle River and, on 15 November 1944, Murray died on a plateau in Lorraine France.

Nancy was born in December 1944 in St Paul.

In 1950, our mother moved Nancy and I from Minnesota to Albuquerque, New Mexico to start a new life.  In Albuquerque, Ruth Ann met and married Ray Arvidson.

As Nancy and I grew up, so did our family---by 1959, our family grew to seven kids.  As the oldest girl, Nancy took on the predominate child care responsibilities.  When she graduated from HS in 1962 she told mom and dad that she wanted to go to college.  Mom’s response was ‘Oh, you won’t make it in college because everyone knows that Bill is the smart one!’.  Two weeks later, I informed mom and dad that I had flunked my freshman year at UNM, I had joined the Army and would leave for basic training the next day.

So Nancy indeed went away to college at NMSU where she excelled in English literature, met and fell in love with Mike Coinman.  Nancy and Mike married in 1967 and Mike became a Naval Aviator.  But, tragically, Mike died in an aviation accident in 1969.

Nancy slowly recovered from Mike’s death.  She taught junior high school in San Diego and began her travels to Europe and to various out of the way places around the world. Of course these were exciting and adventurous travels.  But the real significance of this travel was that Nancy came to realize her true passion—seeking and appreciating the wonder of human diversity and it’s many manifestations.

This passion led Nancy to return to college at the age of 40.  She obtained a masters and then a doctorate in anthropology and archeology from Arizona State University.  She began teaching at Iowa State in 1993.  In 2009, Nancy retired to the Mimbres Valley in southern New Mexico.

Let me relate some comments given by a few who knew Nancy.

From Marie, a younger cousin with whom we grew up:  “Nancy was such a force of nature I guess I thought she would always be with us. I will always think of Nancy surrounded by all the "little" kids - siblings and cousins.  Those were great times, although I bet more so from our perspective than hers!  Remember those drive in movies?”

From Nancy’s friend Pam who befriended her in San Diego in 1969, shortly after Mike died:  “I recall certain images of Nancy--- Nancy cavorting around the pool in Del Mar, her tight little brown body clad in a teeny-weeny-pink bikini, and long blond hair bouncing with her.  We were in the Wadi Hasa, Jordan, where Nancy led field work.  I watched Nancy off in that desolate landscape as she skittered over the rocks looking for artifacts.  

From my friend John, an amateur archeologist:  “I spent a winter day with Nancy as a guide to a few of her beloved Mimbres Valley sites.  Along with her friend Marilyn, we hiked around several sites that are known to few outsiders. Nancy made sketches of the room blocks and kivas and then she pointed out the features of each site. She and Marilyn were constantly alert for potsherds or lithics that they showed me explaining their significance. What a real world education of the past in one short day.”

From Mark, a dear cousin from St Paul: “I only need to close my eyes, and smell the high desert air of the Gila to think of Nancy.  Her intellect, drive and ambition at Iowa State showed through when I visited.  Though she suffered such a great loss early in her married life, it seemed to resolve her, and drive her to places unknown.”
 
In the months before Nancy died, I came to appreciate the distinctive quality of her locale in the Mimbres valley—
Her friends and her community who value and protect the legacy of the Mimbres people, the beauty of the landscape, the nearness to sites of centuries of human habitation, and the daily rhythm of the valley from sunrise, to midday thundershowers to sunset and then punctuated by a stunning nighttime sky.  She was captivated by the natural spirituality of this place.  It fed her body and her spirit.

In July 2015, Nancy died of cancer in her home in Mimbres, New Mexico. We spread Nancy’s ashes at a treasured spot along the Gila River.


Robert Joseph Conzemius

November 30, 1934 – December 27, 2015

Robert “Bob” Conzemius, 81, died of cancer on Sunday, December 27th at his home in Ames Iowa. A Mass of Christian Burial will be 10:00 a.m. Saturday January 2, at St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Ames, Iowa. ..

Bob was born on November 30, 1934 in Breckenridge, Minnesota to John and Helen (Pazdernik) Conzemius. He married Jackie Tessier on August 30, 1958. He served two years for the United States Armed Services before working as a chemist at Ames Laboratory for over 35 years. He was an active member of St. Thomas Aquinas Church and the Knights of Columbus in Ames, Iowa. He was an avid runner and won two gold and two silver medals this last July at the National Senior Track and Field Games. He also enjoyed philosophizing and writing about family history and his own spiritual journey.

Bob is survived by his wife, Jackie; children, Anne (Phil) Herrington of San Diego, CA, Chris (Jeff) Forbes of Dallas, TX, Maureen (Brian) Jessen of Simsbury, CT and Mike (Jeanene) Conzemius in Chanhassen, MN; grandchildren, Luke Herrington, Lana Hoover, Blake Herrington, Ryan Forbes, Nathan Forbes, Kyle Forbes, Ben Jessen, Erica Jessen, Abby Conzemius, and Morgan Conzemius; great grandchildren, Judah Herrington and Piper Forbes. Bob is also survived by siblings John Conzemius, Lorraine Shafer, Dorothy Smude, Dave Conzemius and Mike Conzemius.

In lieu of flowers donations can be made to St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Ames, Iowa.


Betty Core

December 18, 1922 – September 23, 2015

Betty Millen Core, age 92, of Ames, Iowa died at Israel Family Hospice House on September 23, 2015. No services are being planned at this time.

Betty was born in Red Oak, Iowa, December 18, 1922, to William and Lela (Salyers) Millen. She graduated from Red Oak High in 1941 and Jennie Edmundson School of Nursing in 1944. Betty married Merl Roscoe Core in Red Oak on August 5, 1944.

Betty worked at Deland Florida Hospital, St. Luke's in Jacksonville, Doctor's Hospital in Omaha, Mary Greeley in Ames, and Story County Hospital in Nevada. Betty was an active member of Dane 207 Questers, Sun Dial Chapter DAR, Ames Community Thrift Shop for over 20 years, and a former member of American Legion Auxiliary and the Order of Eastern Star.

She is preceded in death by her parents, infant twin daughters, her stepmother, Mae Millen Stephenson, and a half-sister Ruth Millen Olsan.

Betty is survived by her husband Merl; daughter Ellen Franken of Carmel, IN; sons Merl Robert (Bob) of Omaha, NE, William of Neosho, MO and John of Ames, IA, several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Memorials may be directed to the Jennie Edmundson Foundation Attn: Sandy Westphal, 933 East Pierce Council Bluffs, Iowa 51503 or the Sun Dial Chapter DAR Scholarship, 2287 330th Street RR2 Hwy 210 Madrid, Iowa 50156.


Carolyn Cornette

November 6, 1935 – January 7, 2016

Carolyn Christian Cornette, 80, passed away peacefully in her home at 2000 Pinehurst Drive, Ames, Iowa, on Jan 7, 2016, after an 18-month bout with lung cancer.

There will be a visitation on Friday, Jan. 15 from 4:00-6:00 p.m. at the Gathering Place in the Collegiate United Methodist Church in Ames.

A Memorial Service for Carolyn will be held Saturday, Jan. 16, 10:30 a.m. at the church. The service will be followed by a lunch in the church's Wesley Hall.

Jimmye Carolyn Christian was born November 6, 1935 to William Terrill and Frances (Collins) Christian in Claude, Texas. She graduated from Claude High School in 1953 and from West Texas State College in 1956 and taught elementary school for six years in New Mexico.

She then married James Lawson Cornette on April 21, 1962 and moved to Ames in August 1962 where James joined the Department of Mathematics at Iowa State University.

Carolyn's next 54 years were guided by her interest in people of all stripes. She often said that every person has a story, and she tried her best to find it.

This may; have been stimulated by being raised on a ranch 14 miles from the nearest town of 800 people, but it was also a genetic trait that she inherited from her mother.

She was also a life-long sports fan, as well as an outstanding high school basketball player. She played guard on the three-time, six-a-side Class B Texas state champion Claude Mustangettes her sophomore, junior and senior years She was named to the All-State team her senior year.

In spite of having played in nail-biters, Carolyn could never sit still when watching a close game in any sport. Whenever things got too close for her comfort, she would leave her seat and retreat to the concourse area and pace - until she thought it might be safe to return to the game.

In 1974 she and Georgene Shank opened "The Clothesline" a successful consignment clothing store that they operated for 12 years.

In July 1985 Carolyn and James moved to Bethesda, Maryland, where James had a Faculty Improvement Leave to work in the Laboratory of Mathematical Biology in the National Cancer Institute. They stayed until August 1987 and returned again in summer of 1988.

During this time, Carolyn spent her first month being a tourist. Then she started attending Congressional hearings and caught the bug. Her next stop was Sen. Charles Grassley's office, where she volunteered to work - for free.

She spent three weeks filing papers before she was hired as a receptionist - a job for which she was eminently suited - if only because she asked visitors about themselves.

She worked for the Senator for three years. She was also selected to accompany Grassley for three years as he brought international diplomats for weeklong visits to Iowa.

Between 1988 and 1993, the Cornettes spent six summers and two semesters in Boston where James was a collaborator with scientists at Boston University. Not surprisingly, Carolyn quickly found work as a volunteer at WGBH (public television and radio).

Back in Ames, Carolyn decided to open a store that would sell interesting (some educational) games and toys for children and travel books and equipment for travelers. This was "Explore," which she owned and operated for more than 12 years - and which served everyone from teenage tourists to employees of Barilla who wanted to know more about the U.S. - or how to get to Italy.

Carolyn was especially proud of her selection of maps - which made Explore "the largest map store between Kansas City and Minneapolis." The store became a "must visit" for anyone in the area interested in travelling abroad. But by 2004-05 she felt the competition from the Internet and big box stores and closed it in August 2006 - much to the sadness of her employees, who still meet monthly for coffee. As one put it, "Carolyn was the best boss I ever had."

She was also deeply interested in helping anyone who was either neglected or in need of a boost of some kind. That's why she joined A Mid-Iowa Organizing Strategy (AMOS), a group that focuses on social justice issues. She arranged fundraisers for AMOS, but also most enjoyed being involved in "Project Iowa" which helps direct unemployed or underemployed participants into careers that happen to be in demand, such as welding or health care.

Because she cared so much, she was often able to unlock doors and get donations where others might not have succeeded.

When she was diagnosed with cancer, Carolyn received amazing support from friends and family and the medical community. She knew what was coming, but she never stopped smiling and infecting others with her good cheer.

Her attitude inspired several visitors to regard Carolyn as a role model for their passage. She was, as one said, truly one of a kind.

The Collegiate Methodist Church was enormously important to Carolyn. She was a member for 53 years and worked in several capacities - ranging from providing coffee after services to serving on the Board of Directors. She worked extensively on three reentry teams who help women leaving prison integrate into society. Again, it was the people of the church that Carolyn cared about - and they cared about her.

Carolyn and her family are grateful to the Medical team at Bliss Cancer Center who managed her treatment, to the Mayo Clinic for an experimental trial, and to Mary Greeley Medical Center's Hospice care, who cared for Carolyn in her home until her peaceful end.

Carolyn is survived by her husband, James, their two children, James Terrill and Frances Elizabeth and seven grandchildren: Kyle Jay and Ryan Terrill Kirkman; Charlotte Anne, James Christian and Benjamin Lawson Cornette; and Andrew Jason and Ashley Nicole Lehmann.


Hamilton Cravens

August 12, 1938 – November 24, 2015

Dr. Hamilton Cravens, historian and university professor, died in Minneapolis on Tuesday, November 24, at the age of 77. He was born in Evanston, Illinois, on August 12, 1938, the third child of Charles Turner Cravens and Flora Hamilton Cravens.

He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Washington and later earned his Ph.D. in history from the University of Iowa. After teaching at Ohio State University for several years, he accepted a position at Iowa State University in 1968. He taught in the Iowa State history department for the next 42 years and was named a distinguished scholar in arts and humanities in 2006.

During his long professional career, he was awarded several Fulbright awards, serving as Fulbright professor in Germany at Goettingen University (1988-89) and at Bonn University and Max Planck Institute (1997). In 2007, he was a Distinguished Fulbright scholar at the Roosevelt Study Center in the Netherlands.

Since moving to Minneapolis in 2011, he has been affiliated with the History of Science and Technology Department of the University of Minnesota.

During his fifty-year professional career, he authored numerous books and articles and two of his books, The Triumph of Evolution and Before Head Start, are considered classics in his field. He was working on a history of the social sciences at the time of his death. He was a member of the American Historical Association, the American Studies Association, the Organization of American Historians, and the History of Science Society.

An ardent Democrat, he supported a variety of progressive causes and used Facebook as a vehicle for frequent comments on politics and current affairs. He loved jazz, dining out, and corny jokes. He was a mentor to young historians and had many friends within his profession, some dating back to graduate school days.

He is survived by his wife, Carole Davis Kazmierski; his daughter, Heather (Jamie) Watne; his son, Chris (Michelle) Cravens; his two stepsons, David (Jennifer) Strahan and Mark Strahan; four grandchildren, Ty Watne, Madison Cravens, Emily Strahan, and Natalie Strahan; his brother, Charlie Cravens; his sister, Virginia Vater; numerous nieces and nephews; and countless students. He was preceded in death by his parents, his beloved brother-in-law, Walt Vater, and his first wife, Joan Pemberton Cravens.

A memorial service will be held at Lakewood Cemetery on Saturday, February 20, 2016. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to KBEM (JAZZ 88 FM), the public radio voice for jazz and education in the Twin Cities.

Hamilton Cravens
Tribute by his colleague, Amy Bix

Highlight of their employment:
Hamilton was a long-standing member of the History of Science Society, within which he held particular respect for his intellectual contributions to the history of the social sciences, as understood within the context of broader American culture. As the author of admired monographs, academic articles, book chapters, and popularly-accessible treatments, Hamilton notably advanced the understanding of subjects such as the history of childhood-development work, the political positioning of social-science research, and the nature of ideas about race, evolution, heredity, and modernity. He held multiple Fulbright awards and was closely involved with the History of Science Society, the Forum for the History of Science in America, and the Midwest Junto for the History of Science.

Personal memory:
I will always be grateful to Hamilton for his professional support and department friendship starting from when I first arrived at ISU as a new assistant professor. His cheerful laugh and smile, his skilled academic insights, and his insights into our field all made it a joy to spend time talking with him.

Hamilton Cravens
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

 
Hamilton Cravens died in Minneapolis on November 24, 2015, at the age of 77. He was born in Evanston, Illinois, and grew up in Olympia, Washington. He received his undergraduate degree and master’s degree in history at the University of Washington, and then took his Ph.D. at the University of Iowa in 1969. He taught as an instructor first at the Ohio State University and then at Iowa State University, where he became an assistant professor upon completing his Ph.D. Promoted to associate professor in 1973 and full professor in 1980, he was named Distinguished Arts and Humanities Scholar at Iowa State in 2007.

Dr. Cravens authored two books, The Triumph of Evolution: American Scientists and the Hereditary-Environment Controversy, in 1978, and Before Head Start: The Iowa Station and America’s Children, in 1993. He edited four other volumes and wrote numerous articles. At the time of his death, he was working on a third scholarly monograph, tentatively titled Designing Humanity: The Social and Behavioral Sciences in America, under contract with Johns Hopkins University Press.

During his career at Iowa State, he held appointments as a visiting scholar at the Hoover Institution at Stanford, as a Fulbright Distinguished Professor at the University of Göttingen, and later at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne. He was a visiting scholar at the Max-Planck-Institute for History in Göttingen, scholar-in-residence at Tohoku University in Japan, and a Fulbright distinguished scholar at the Roosevelt Study Center in the Netherlands. After his retirement from Iowa State in 2010, he was affiliated with the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine Department at the University of Minnesota.

He is survived by his wife, Carole Davis Kazmierski; his daughter, Heather Watne; and his son, Chris Cravens, as well as two stepsons; four grandchildren; and his sister, Virginia Vater.


Larry R. Curtis

September 23, 1945 – January 20, 2016

An ongoing family debate was finally resolved this week: duct tape does not in fact solve every problem. After several frustrating months of illness, Larry Curtis passed from us on January 21, 2016.

Larry is remembered by his wife, Pam Rennie Curtis, his children and their spouses, Lexa and Jim and Chad and Jennifer, his grandchildren Clara, Adeline, Spencer, and Lauren, his brother and sister-in-law, Dan and Connie Curtis, and his father Raymond, as well as countless friends, colleagues, clients, and students.

Larry was a dedicated public servant, beginning with his service to our country in Vietnam, for which he earned a Bronze Star, and continuing with many years' service to the City of Ames. His devotion to service took other forms as well, leading to 41 years shaping the minds of business students at Iowa State University and using his extraordinary mind to help his clients as an attorney.

As those who knew him are aware, though, his true passions were family, cooking, Iowa State athletics, and last but surely not least, golf. Larry was happiest, when he was able to combine those things he loved most: tailgating with family and friends in the backyard before ISU football games, coaching his children's little league and softball teams, experiencing new places and tastes while traveling, and racking up his 10 hole in ones.

 His impact on the City of Ames and the ISU community will, hopefully, be long felt. His influence on his family and friends will, without question, be missed, but will be fondly and frequently recalled.

Memorial services will be held at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church, with Visitation on Sunday, January 24th from 2-5 pm and a celebration of life service on Monday, January 25th at 10:30 am. In lieu of flowers, a memorial fund has been established at First National Bank of Ames and will be used to establish remembrances at Iowa State University and Ames Golf and Country Club.

Larry R. Curtis
Tribute by his daughter, Alexandra Mack

ISU work experience:
41 years as an adjunct professor with the College of Business.

Personal memory:
My dad loved Ames and Iowa State and was very proud to be associated with both. He was always one of my greatest teachers; though as an engineer, he was a bit over my head when I asked him for help with 4th grade math. Dad was a great teacher, but also never stopped learning himself. We miss him and hope to honor him by being curious, inquisitive, and seeking out things to learn.

Larry R. Curtis
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

After several frustrating months of illness, Larry Curtis passed from us on January 21, 2016. Larry is remembered by his wife, Pam Rennie Curtis, his children and their spouses, Lexa and Jim and Chad and Jennifer, his grandchildren Clara, Adeline, Spencer, and Lauren, his brother and sister-in-law, Dan and Connie Curtis, and his father Raymond, as well as countless friends, colleagues, clients, and students. Larry was a dedicated public servant, beginning with his service to our country in Vietnam, for which he earned a Bronze Star, and continuing with many years' service to the City of Ames, including as mayor from 1990 to 1997. His devotion to service took other forms as well, leading to 41 years shaping the minds of business students at Iowa State University, where tens of thousands of students took his business law classes. He also maintained a law practice in Ames, where he used his extraordinary mind to help his clients as an attorney.

As those who knew him are aware, though, his true passions were family, cooking, Iowa State athletics, and last but surely not least, golf. Larry was happiest, when he was able to combine those things he loved most: tailgating with family and friends in the backyard before ISU football games, coaching his children's little league and softball teams, experiencing new places and tastes while traveling, and racking up his 10 hole in ones. His impact on the City of Ames and the ISU community will, hopefully, be long felt. His influence on his family and friends will, without question, be missed, but will be fondly and frequently recalled.


Donald T. Davidson, Jr.

June 7, 1943 – November 15, 2015

Donald T. Davidson, Jr., passed away on 17 November at the age of 72. He died among friends, the wonderful caregivers at Bickford Assisted Living in Ames.

Don graduated from Ames High School in 1961 and attended Iowa State University for two years. He served in the U.S. Army Reserves. For over 40 years he was employed at ISU as a laboratory mechanical technician with the Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering Department.

Don was preceded in death by his parents.

He is survived by his brother, John Davidson (Sherry); his sister, Ann Costanzo (Michael); nephews Donald T. Davidson III (Jessica), Joseph Davidson, Alex Costanzo, and Peter Costanzo (Madaline); nieces Audrey Davidson and Suzanne Maas (Patrick); and great-nephews Justin Maas and Jared Maas.

The family will gather privately to celebrate the life of a loving brother and uncle, who will be dearly missed.


Chuck Evans

March 4, 1940 – July 31, 2015

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of our father, Chuck Evans, who passed away peacefully after a brief stay at West Georgia Hospice in LaGrange, Georgia on July 31, 2015 at the age of 75. He was a loving father, grandfather, friend and teacher. We will greatly miss his companionship, perpetual curiosity and unique sense of humor.

Chuck Evans was an artist whose works, technical innovations, writings and teaching have made lasting contributions to metalsmithing and the American Arts. He was introduced to metals through his friend David Pimentel and learned design and technique while studying under Hans Christensen and Albert Paley at the School of American Craftsmen, Rochester Institute of Technology, 1969-1972.

After earning his MFA, he taught at Bowling Green State University for six years before moving to Iowa in 1978 to open the metals program for Iowa State University’s College of Design, where he was Professor of Jewelry and Metals from 1978 through 2001. His artwork spanned 30+ years and has been shown in 200+ exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad. He authored the textbook *Jewelry; Contemporary Design and Technique*, 1983, Davis Publications and contributed with great detail and unflinching candor to many books and professional publications over the course of his life.

A true purist, Chuck held individual expression above all and shunned labels with great vigor. Some of the noted artists with whom he interacted included Heikke Seppa, Philip Fike, John Marshall, Fred Fenster, Ronald Pearson, Richard Thomas, Eleanor Moty, Alma Eikerman, Dominick Labino, Wendell Castle, Peter Voulkos, Frans Wildenhain and Philip Morton.

Serving nearly 10 years in the Navy from 1957-1967 after dropping out of high school, Chuck went through college in part supported by the G.I. Bill. Later in life, he reconnected with many of his shipmates from aboard the U.S.S. Mills and the U.S.S. Greenlet ASR-10 and derived a lot of pleasure from those rekindled friendships. He also dug deep into genealogy to better understand his Smith Island, Maryland ancestry, and he built a 21’ wooden boat to carry on his family’s boat building and fishing heritage. Though Chuck had many loves besides his family, his love of teaching and the connection he had with his students brought him great joy. We are full of gratitude that he was touched by so many students who are teaching today and share some part of him with future generations.

Following our father’s wishes, he will be interned at sea by the U.S. Navy with full honors. A private gathering to remember him and his work is being planned for family and friends. In lieu of flowers, we request that donations be made to Penland School of Crafts whose mission is to support individual and artistic growth through craft.

Chuck Evans is survived by his children, Sherrill Evans (Lary) Mahoney, of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida; his son, Eric (Jennifer) Evans of Niskayuna, NY; his sisters, Sherrill (Cecil) Wilkins of Cary, NC and Sallie (RJ) Warren of Garner, NC; and three grandchildren, Sarah, Jack and Owen. Sarah will begin her college studies at R.I.T. this fall.

Chuck Evans
Tribute by his daughter, Sherrill Evans

ISU work experience:
Professor of Jewelry and Metalsmithing, 1978-2001 and Author of Jewelry: Contemporary Design and Technique.

Highlight of their employment:
Chuck's artwork spanned 30+ years and was shown in 200+ exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad. One of his many highlights while at I.S.U. was the honor of being recognized as the first artist to ever receive the Burlington Northern Faculty Achievement Award for Research and Scholarship.

Personal memory:
One memory that strikes me as particularly funny and struck Dad that way too was a time we were at an event and folks started to country line dance. We did our best but our best was awful. We laughed until we cried then and year after year when we remembered that night.

Other thoughts to share:
Chuck loved encouraging others to shun labels, have fun and be themselves. He is deeply missed.


Bruce Judson Firkins Jr.

September 25, 1923 – May 25, 2015

Bruce Judson Firkins, Jr., of Saddle River, N.J., and formerly a 55-year resident of Scarsdale, N.Y., died on May 25th. He was 91 years old. Born in Ames, Ia., to Bruce J. Firkins, Sr., Professor of Agronomy at Iowa State University, and Nelle Berkhimer, he graduated from Iowa State in 1948 with a Bachelor of Science degree in General Engineering. His education was interrupted in 1943 by World War II service in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He was separated in 1946 as a 1st Lieutenant after serving as an aircraft maintenance officer. Mr. Firkins joined the General Electric Co. in 1950 and served in a number of communications, public and government relations and marketing assignments in Schenectady, N.Y., Syracuse, N.Y., and ultimately New York City. He retired from General Electric in 1986 as Manager of Regional Relations in the northeastern region, representing the corporate office in customer relations and public affairs. He married Helen Mabie of Amsterdam, N.Y. in 1950, and they moved to Scarsdale in 1956. Mrs. Firkins predeceased her husband in 2013. He is survived by sister Miriam F. Hardy and nephew Joseph Hardy, both of Des Moines, Ia., son Bruce and wife Diane of Allendale, N.J.; son Bradford and wife Terry of Fayetteville, N.Y.; four grandchildren, Andrew, Katharine, William and Mee Rae; and two great-grandsons, Cole and Alexander. Mr. Firkins was a former deacon and elder at the Greenville Community Reformed Church in Scarsdale. He served several terms on the Edgemont School District Board of Education and was a long-time election inspector for the Town of Greenburgh, N.Y. He also was active in the Rotary Club of New York City, the New York Chamber of Commerce, the United Way, the Red Cross, and Junior Achievement, and supported the Greenburgh Nature Center and the New York Botanical Garden. He was a member for more than 45 years of St. Andrews Golf Club in Hastings, N.Y., serving as club team captain, and also was a member of Shenorock Shore Club in Rye, N.Y. Mr. Firkins and his wife Helen traveled to many parts of the world, enjoyed the seashore, New York City and the theater, as well as the love and joy of their grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and the company of their many friends, his family said. Memorial donations may be made to the American Red Cross, P.O. Box 4002018, Des Moines, IA, 50340-2018 or to the Greenville Community Reformed Church, 270 Ardsley Road, Scarsdale, N.Y. 10583. Arrangements were by Vander Plaat Funeral Home, Wyckoff.


Charles Frederick “Fred” Foreman

November 9, 1920 – July 22, 2015

Charles Frederick 'Fred' Foreman", age 94, was born on November 9, 1920. He died peacefully in his sleep at age 94 on July 22, 2015. He was preceded in death by his parents and an infant daughter. He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Melba (Zimmerman) Foreman, sons, John (Sandy), Mike (Dawn), Lance (Karen), grandchildren Dawn Foreman (Peter Schuyler), Aimee Foreman (Kevin Vosen), KC Foreman, Kelli (Nick) Martin, Kathleen (Brad) Anderson, Jim Foreman, Chad Morin, Steven Morin, great grandchildren Bennett Vosen, Mila Vosen, Olivia Schuyler, Mason Martin, and Parker Martin. He is also survived by his sister Doyn (Foreman) Wiler and niece Andrea (Wiler) Ham.

Fred, as he preferred to be called, was born on a small farm near Blue Rapids, Kansas, where he worked with his parents, Homer and Geraldine (Estes) Foreman, and his younger sister Doyn through the Great Depression. He enlisted in the Army after World War II broke out where he rose through the ranks to be an officer. He participated in the invasion of the Philippines. He continued in the U. S. Army Reserves until he retired with the rank of Lt. Colonel.

After leaving the active duty army he returned to Kansas and enrolled in Kansas State University. He rapidly achieved his under graduate degree and a master's degree in Dairy Science. He also met and married a young lady living next door to the home in Manhattan where his parents moved after the war. After graduating from Kansas State the family moved to Columbia, Missouri, where he worked on his PhD. After attaining his doctorate, he moved his growing family back to Manhattan to work for a short time at Kansas State. Then he took advantage of an opportunity and he accepted a position with the faculty of the University of Minnesota. In 1955, the family again moved to Ames, Iowa, where Fred became a member of the staff of what later became Iowa State University. He stayed at Iowa State until his retirement in 1985. At Iowa State he rose through the ranks to become a full Professor and then Professor in charge of the Dairy Science Department. He won a number of awards as a teacher and advisor. He was a popular professor in the College of Agriculture and was the faculty advisor to various student organizations. Early in his career he coached the dairy cattle judging team. His teams won titles at a number of events including the National Dairy Cattle Congress competition.

As a part of his activities while at Kansas State, the University of Minnesota, and Iowa State, Fred began to judge dairy cattle at local fairs, state fairs, and regional shows. He combined a good eye for functional type--physical characteristics of the cattle that were positively correlated to higher production of milk--with the ability to articulate the reasons for the decisions he made clearly and persuasively. As his reputation as a dairy cattle judge grew he was asked to judge more prestigious shows and speak at type conferences. The information farmers learned at these shows and conferences influenced the decisions they made about which cattle to use for breeding. For over a generation Fred was one of the most respected dairy cattle judges in the world. He was one the few judges asked to judge the national shows of all six major dairy cattle breeds in the United States. His record of thirteen national shows judged is still one of the best in history. In addition, Fred was asked to judge national shows or shows of importance in Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. He continued his travel and judging for years after his retirement from teaching duties at Iowa State.

Although Fred judged prestigious shows, he also judged a number of local and junior shows. He enjoyed the drama of the national shows, but he also enjoyed conducting "fitting and showing" shows that allowed him to teach young people the art and science of showing dairy cattle. He was a relentless recruiter of young people on farms everywhere to go to college as a way to be a better farmer or to find a job off the farm. Convincing parents to support children to go to college was a hard sell in some households early in his career, but Fred was able to use his own career as an example. His advocacy persuaded many families to send their youngsters to college and quite a few went to Iowa State. One of his proudest moments came with the establishment of the Fred Foreman Scholarship Fund at Iowa State University.

Fred and Melba retired to Arizona in 1985 to enjoy their grandchildren and the weather. He stayed connected with friends and former associates and enjoyed being a mentor to many of his former students as well as children and grandchildren. Fred and Melba played golf regularly at the Palmbrook Country Club in Sun City where they lived until moving to Sagewood in north Phoenix. He was quick to make friends, was an excellent dancer and loved to travel. He enjoyed singing, playing bridge and had a great sense of humor. Fred was very proud of his family and will be remembered as a beloved husband, loving father, grandfather, great grandfather and caring brother, uncle and friend.

In lieu of flowers Fred expressed an interest in remembrance by contributions to the Fred Foreman Scholarship c/o Prof. Howard Tyler, Dairy Science Department, 1221 Kildee Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3150.

Private family inurnment to be held at a later date.


Melba Dee Foreman

– February 21, 2016

Melba Dee Foreman, 89, died in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Feb. 21, 2016. Born Melba Dee Zimmerman in Larned, Kan., she is survived by her sons and their spouses, John (Sandy), Mike (Dawn) and Lance (Karen); eight grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and sisters Zora Weir and Carrie Lou Biddle.

She was preceded in death by her parents; husband of 68 years, Fred; infant daughter, Jean; and sister, Maxine Caley.

Melba attended Kansas State University, where she met and married Fred Foreman. They raised their family in Ames, where both taught at Iowa State University. They retired to Arizona in 1985.

Family and friends will miss her quiet sense of humor and her constant, unwavering love.

The family encourages contributions for cancer research to the Mayo Clinic online at www.mayoclinic.org/development or mailed to the Department of Development, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. SW, Rochester, MN, 55905.

Melba Dee Forman and Charles Frederick “Fred” Foreman
Tribute by their son, John Foreman

Retired Iowa State University faculty members Fred and Melba Foreman died during the past year. Charles Frederick "Fred" Foreman died peacefully in his sleep of congestive heart failure at age 94 on July 22, 2015. Seven months later, Melba Foreman also died peacefully in her sleep of congestive heart failure at the age of 89 on February 21, 2016. They had been married for 68 years.

Fred, as he preferred to be called, was born on a small farm near Blue Rapids, Kansas, north of Manhattan. He grew up working on that farm during the Great Depression. Melba also grew up on a small farm during the Dust Bowl days of the Great Depression, but in southern Kansas, south of Wichita.

Fred enlisted in the United States Army after World War II broke out. He rose through the ranks to be an officer. He participated in the invasion of the Philippines and earned a Bronze Star. He continued in the U. S. Army Reserves until he retired with the rank of Lt. Colonel. After leaving the active duty army he returned to Kansas, took advantage of the GI Bill, and rapidly achieved his under graduate degree and a master's degree in Dairy Science at Kansas State University.

Melba graduated from high school, went to Emporia State University for a year, and then began to teach in a one-room country school near her family farm. After contributing to the family’s income for a few of years, she moved north to complete her education at Kansas State University.

As chance would have it, Fred’s parents lived next door to Melba’s sister. In the Fall of 1946, they met. They married that December. Two children followed over the next three years while Melba and Fred completed their studies.

After Fred and Melba graduated the family moved to Columbia, Missouri, where Fred received his Ph.D. in ruminant nutrition. Melba put her degree in home economics into practical application.

After Fred graduated from the University of Missouri, the family moved back to Manhattan where Fred worked for a short time at Kansas State. Then Fred accepted a position with the faculty of the University of Minnesota, and the family moved to Rosemont, Minnesota. Finally, in 1955, the family moved to Ames, Iowa, where Fred became a member of the staff of Iowa State University. He stayed at Iowa State for thirty years until his retirement in 1985. At Iowa State he rose through the ranks to become a full Professor and then Professor in Charge of the Dairy Science section of the Animal Science Department.

Early in his career he coached Iowa State’s dairy cattle judging team. His teams won titles at a number of events including the national championship at the National Dairy Cattle Congress competition. He won a variety of awards as a teacher and advisor. He was a popular professor in the College of Agriculture and was the faculty advisor to various student organizations. In1966, he was voted professor of the year by the students in the College of Agriculture. He was tapped for Cardinal Key in 1967.

Fred also judged dairy cattle at local fairs, state fairs, and regional shows. He combined a good eye for functional type--physical characteristics of the cattle that were positively correlated to higher production of milk--with the ability to articulate the reasons for the decisions he made clearly and persuasively. As his reputation as a dairy cattle judge grew he was asked to judge more prestigious shows and speak at type conferences. The information farmers learned at these shows and conferences influenced the decisions they made about which cattle to use for breeding. For over a generation Fred was one of the most respected dairy cattle judges in the world. He was one the few judges asked to judge the national shows of all six major dairy cattle breeds in the United States. His record of thirteen national shows judged is still one of the best in history. In addition, Fred was asked to judge national shows or shows of importance in Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. He continued his travel and judging for years after his retirement from teaching duties at Iowa State. In 1984, he was selected as the Guest of Honor by the National Dairy Shrine.

Although Fred judged prestigious shows, he also judged a number of local and junior shows. He enjoyed the drama of the national shows, but he also enjoyed conducting "fitting and showing" classes that allowed him to teach young people the art and science of showing dairy cattle. He was a relentless recruiter of young people on farms everywhere to go to college as a way to be a better farmer or to find a job off the farm. Convincing parents to support children to go to college was a hard sell in many households he visited, but Fred was able to use his own career as an example of what a kid who grew up on a farm could achieve with the help of a college education. His advocacy persuaded many families to send their youngsters to college and quite a few came to Iowa State. One of his proudest moments came with the establishment by some of his former students of the Fred Foreman Scholarship Fund at Iowa State University.

Melba spent her early years in Ames raising what had become a family of three boys. Two of their sons eventually graduated from Iowa State. She also decided to return to her own education and get a Master’s Degree. Melba became an Assistant Professor on the Library Services staff and taught a course for many years on the use of the library at Iowa State.

Fred and Melba retired to Arizona in 1985 to enjoy their grandchildren and the weather. They stayed connected with friends and former associates. Fred enjoyed being a mentor to many of his former students as well as their children and grandchildren. Melba enjoyed cooking, sewing, and playing the piano for her friends, children and grandchildren. Fred and Melba played golf regularly in Sun City, where they lived until moving to Sagewood near the Mayo Clinic Hospital in north Phoenix in 2010. They are survived by three sons and their wives, eight grandchildren, and five great grandchildren.

Melba Dee Foreman
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Melba Dee Foreman, 89, died in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Feb. 21, 2016.

Born Melba Dee Zimmerman in Larned, Kansas, she is survived by her sons and their spouses, John (Sandy), Mike (Dawn) and Lance (Karen); eight grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and sisters Zora Weir and Carrie Lou Biddle.

She was preceded in death by her parents; husband of 68 years, Fred; infant daughter, Jean; and sister, Maxine Caley.

Melba attended Kansas State University, where she met and married Fred Foreman. They raised their family in Ames, where both taught at Iowa State University. They retired to Arizona in 1985.

Family and friends will miss her quiet sense of humor and her constant, unwavering love.

Melba began her career at Iowa State University as an Instructor in the Library in September, 1967 and retired as an Assistant Professor in May, 1985. In a May 8, 1985 letter from the Dean of Library Services, Warren B. Kuhn, he commended her for more than eighteen years of excellent contributions and dedicated service to the Library, stating her most generous and thoughtful concern to students and colleagues and an outstanding willingness to shoulder burdens and always go that “extra mile”. Above all, her devotion and thoughtful support of the Library’s mission has been exemplary.


Karl-Heinz Friederich

March 13, 1929 – August 28, 2015

Born in Mainz, Germany, on March 13, 1929, to Mathias and Barbara Friederich, Karl-Heinz was shaped by the political and social climate of the time, as well as the subsequent devastation to his home and country in WWII. Although stricken with polio during the war, Karl recovered sufficiently to row with the German national team in 1948. That same year, Karl’s father returned from the Russian POW camp, where he, unbeknownst to his family, had been interned since 1945. With his English skills honed in service to the US Army after the war, Karl received a scholarship to study at Creighton University. He disembarked the Anna Selen in New York and boarded a train for Omaha with $40 in his pocket in 1951. While at Creighton, Karl met and married Teresa Buche in 1952. Over their 63 years together, Karl, Teresa, and their children Charles, Catherine, John, Barbara, and James created lasting memories in a variety of homes throughout the US, as well as during Karl’s Fulbright year in Germany. After completing his PhD work at the University of Wisconsin in 1967, Karl joined the faculty of the journalism department at Iowa State University, from which he retired in 1992.

A man of deep conviction, love of his adopted and birth countries, and passion for politics and service to others, Karl filled his retirement years to overflowing with bridge (Life Master), gardening, mentoring and tutoring international students and refugees, volunteering (serving on the boards of Youth and Shelter Services, Friendship Ark Homes, Israel Family Hospice House, Mary Greeley Medical Center) and the ever-present political activities (election judge, chairman of the Story County Republican Party) that had begun with his involvement in the AU-H2O campaign of 1961 before Karl was even able to vote in the US elections (citizenship gained in 1963).

Lifted up in prayer by his family, Karl-Heinz Friederich drew his last breath while his beloved Jeopardy aired in the background in Columbus, GA, on August 28, 2015. He will be profoundly missed by his wife, children, 15 grandchildren, and 22 great-grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be directed to the charity of your choice or the endowment for the Monsignor James Supple Chair of Catholic Studies at Iowa State University.

Karl-Heinz Friederich
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Karl Friederich played a key role as a faculty member in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication (now the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication) at Iowa State University. Karl joined the faculty in the fall of 1967 as an assistant professor with a half-time teaching and half-time extension appointment. He arrived from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he was working toward his Ph.D. in Mass Communications, and also had significant newspaper and international communication expertise. His extension work carried him through 1975, after which he had a full-time appointment in the department.

Karl’s international experience and interests led him to become involved with a growing university interest in global affairs. He was named chair of the university’s International Studies program in 1973 and continued in that role for the next 13 years. He and other journalism faculty members launched the Department’s first European Study Program in 1976, and he helped direct this program over the next six even-numbered years. Students received academic credit plus invaluable contacts and training through the program. At Iowa State, Karl taught the Department’s international communication course, and advised many international graduate student thesis projects.

Karl is probably best known by many of his former students for developing and teaching public relations courses in the Department, and he built the foundation for what is now a stand-alone Public Relations major in the Greenlee School. The emphasis was on development of highly ethical media/company relationships. In dealings with students, businesses and university colleagues, Karl practiced what he taught. He was straightforward and direct – you always knew exactly where he stood. His high ethics and management skills also were recognized outside the University. He served as co-chair of the Republican Party of Story County. Karl was not always on the same side of issues as other faculty members. In one case, Karl was in charge of communication for a campaign to privatize the City of Ames electric utility, while Democrat Bill Kunerth was running the opposition campaign. Both men continued to be close friends over the years despite their opposing political ideologies. When members of the faculty decided to form an educational investment club, Karl was selected to be its treasurer, and served for almost 20 years.

In the Department, Karl played a vital role as adviser and later chair of the Bomb Yearbook Publication Board, and also served six years as a faculty representative to the Daily Publication Board. He was an expert in financial, production, and journalistic aspects for both of these publications. He also served as adviser to the local PRSSA chapter.

Those of us who had the privilege to work with Karl know that while he could be gruff on occasion, he cared deeply about us and our program. As can be seen by the many responsibilities he willingly shouldered, he saw what needed to be done, and he did it cheerfully and skillfully. When faculty who made a difference here are remembered, Karl is certainly one of them.

-- By Eric Abbott, Professor, Greenlee School


Carlyle “CJ” Jay Gauger

March 6, 1914 – April 26, 2015

C.J. Gauger, 101, of Ames, passed away April 26, 2015 at Green Hills Health Care Center.

C.J. was a good man, and he believed a good life included service to others. He looked for the best in people, and helped them to see and bring it out in themselves, and in the world. We who love him, and whose lives were made better by time spent with him, will carry on his good work in our lives now.

Carlyle J. Gauger was born March 6, 1914 to Albert W. and Lydia (Schwieger) Gauger in McGregor, IA. He graduated from high school in Holstein, IA. C.J. completed a Bachelor of Science and a Masters Degree in Ag Education at Iowa State University, where FarmHouse Fraternity was an important part of his college experience, as well as his life. While at ISU, C.J. met Dorothy Clark at the college library. Study dates turned to marriage on August 23, 1940 at Iowa State’s formal gardens. Dorothy was his beloved bride for almost 66 years until she passed away in 2006. During WWII, C.J. served in the Army as an aviation engineer.

For over 20 years, C.J. was the State 4-H and Youth Leader for the ISU Extension Service. It was work he loved, and through which he thrived, as did so many of the people with whom he worked and who he inspired. He retired from ISU in 1979 and continued to work, first at the University of Missouri (1979-81) as the Director of Resource Development, then for International FarmHouse Fraternity (1982-85) as the Director of Expansion. C.J. was a member of Collegiate United Methodist Church in Ames and served on local and state committees for the Methodist Church. He was also a FRIEND of Ceres Fraternity. The chairman of the ISU Athletic Council for a time, C.J. remained a loyal Cyclone fan throughout his life.

C.J. had immense love for each and all of us in his family. He also offered wise counsel when we sought his clear, practical yet creative thinking and long-term view. He is survived by three daughters, Barbara Gauger of Ames, Jan (Gary) Richards of San Jose, CA, and Jean (Hiram Rogers) Gauger of Knoxville, TN; five grandchildren, Ben Gauger, Elizabeth Gauger, Amelia (Gabriel) Fierro-Fine, Anne (John) Tornatore-Pili and Matt Richards; and his daughter-in-law, Charlotte Cleavenger Gauger, of Ames.

He was preceded in death by his son, Don Gauger, and his wife, Dorothy Gauger.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to the Iowa 4-H Foundation (see their website), the C.J. and Dorothy Gauger Endowment Fund at the FarmHouse Foundation (7306 NW Tiffany Springs Parkway, Kansas City, MO 64153), or the charity of your choice.

C.J. touched so many lives and we are the better for it.

C. J. Gauger
Tribute by his daughter, Jean Gauger

“A life 'well-lived' needs to include service to others.”
 
Dad made this comment over thirty years ago, as we talked about life pathways, and a meaningful life.  We returned to the discussion many times, over the years.  His life included enthusiasm, vision, dedication, and a good amount of generous service to others.  His was a life 'well-lived.'
 
It is tough to realize he no longer physically is with us.  But he influenced so many lives.  His impact carries on, through so many people. 

I love you, Dad.  You always will be in our hearts and minds.

Jean


Sherry Janelle Glenn

August 18, 1947 – April 7, 2016

Sherry Janelle (Teachout) Glenn, 68, of Urbandale passed away on April 7, 2016 after a courageous battle with cancer. The family will receive and embrace friends during a Visitation from 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM on Thursday, April 14, 2016 at Caldwell Parrish Funeral Home & Crematory. A celebration of life service will be at 11:00 AM on Friday, April 15, 2016 at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Des Moines, with a luncheon hosted by the family to follow the service. In lieu of flowers, tribute gifts can be made to the Endowment at Living History Farms

Sherry was born on August 18, 1947 to Harold and Mildred Teachout in Shenandoah, Iowa. The Teachouts continued a multi-generation tradition dedicated to community service and farming in rural Fremont County near Farragut. Sherry excelled in school, sports, social activities and the 4-H program through which she traveled the world and dedicated much of her personal and professional life. Sherry attended Iowa State University where she earned her B.S in Elementary Education, married future DVM John Patrick Glenn and developed of lifelong love for the Cyclones. After brief residencies near Atlanta and Phoenix, Pat and Sherry made their home in Guthrie Center. Life took an unexpectedly abrupt turn, setting Sherry on a path to earn her M.S. in Special Education from ISU and ultimately her PhD in Higher Education Administration and Leadership from the University of Nebraska. From 1979-1987, Sherry taught in the Guthrie Center School District; from 1987-1991, she led the Extension and 4-H youth program for Dallas and Guthrie Counties. From 1991 – 2016, Sherry held many positions within Iowa State’s Extension and Outreach including Interim Associate Vice Provost for the Extension, Tabor Extension Fellow with the National Association of Counties in Washington, D.C., Area Extension Director, and most recently Assistant Vice President for County Services.

Sherry dedicated her life to education and serving others. Sherry was a member at Westminster Presbyterian Church, and was also involved in many organizations including; American Association of University Women, ISU Order of the Knoll, Order of the Eastern Star, Phi Beta Theta International Scholars, P.E.O., Pi Beta Phi Fraternity for Women, and the Living History Farms Board of Directors. Her dedication and loyalty to every cause and program that was blessed with her presence will be long remembered and greatly missed.

Her legacy lives on in the family she held dear. Sherry is survived by her children; Jeremy (Jennifer) Glenn of Chicago, IL, Erin (Greg) Feldmann of Ankeny, IA, grandchildren; Allison Glenn, Lydia Glenn, Annabelle Glenn, Jacob Feldmann, Nathan Feldmann, Lauren Feldmann, brother; Harold Mackoy “Mack” Teachout (Carolyn Gilbert) of Farragut, IA, Nephew; Brandon (Miranda) Teachout, aunt; Elaine Snyder, first cousins; David Evans, Holly Krabbenhoeft, and Julie Cooper.


Ellen Bernadette Hadwiger

December 4, 1932 – July 8, 2015

Ellen Hadwiger, 82, died on July 8, 2015, in Tomales, Calif. A vigil service will be held at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church, in Ames, on Aug. 7 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Her funeral will be at St. Thomas on Aug. 8 at 10 a.m.

Ellen was born Ellen Bernadette Van Laanen to Walter and Mary Van Laanen in Green Bay, Wis.

Ellen married Don Hadwiger in Norman, Okla., on July 4, 1953.

Ellen was active in the St. Thomas Aquinas parish, where she served on the parish council, volunteered as the church librarian and participated in many parish committees. She was active in the Iowa Democratic Party.

After her son, John, was born with developmental disabilities, Ellen became active in the Association for Retarded Citizens. She was the founding president of Mainstream Living, a residential program for persons with developmental disabilities.
Ellen received a bachelor’s degree in special education from Iowa State University. She taught preschool to disabled children at Willson-Beardshear School.

Ellen organized the Archie & Nancy Martin Foundation to recognize one of the founding African-American families in Ames.

Ellen was preceded in death by her husband, Dr. Don Hadwiger, her parents, Walter and Mary Van Laanen, her brothers, Hugh and Robert Van Laanen, and her sister, Carla Murphy.

Ellen will be dearly missed by her children, Mary Pepper-Mackey, Stephen Hadwiger, David Soherr-Hadwiger, Edith Goetz, Arlis Deloach and John Hadwiger; her grandchildren, Rolena Stephenson, Analee Pepper, Robert Goetz, Philip Hadwiger, Devon Skadberg, Dana Goetz, Paul Hadwiger, Julienne Mackey, Anna Goetz, Jiro Deloach, Jenna Soherr, Johnny Goetz, Lauren Soherr, Mariko Deloach and Genevieve Goetz; and her great-grandson, Dane Stephenson.

Memorial contributions can be made either to Mainstream Living Incorporated or to St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Ames.


Charles B. Handy

April 26, 1924 – January 4, 2016

Charles B. Handy, 91 years old, of Independence, Iowa, died on Monday, January 4, 2016, at Lexington Estates in Independence.  He was born on April 26, 1924, in Coffey, Missouri, the son of Herbert Franklin and Laura Ada (Mueller) Handy.  During World War II, he served in the U.S. Navy.  He earned a B.A. degree in economics from Westminster College in Missouri, and a M.A. degree in Accounting from the University of Iowa in Iowa City.  He finished his Doctorate in Economics at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.  Dr. Handy taught accounting at Iowa State University and was the Founding Dean of the College of Business.

Dr. Handy was married to Nancy L. Pearson.  He later married Donna Jean Peters in Washington, Iowa.  She preceded him in death in 1993.  On November 5, 1994, he and the former Mary Catherine McGrane were married in Iowa City, Iowa.  Dr. Handy was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Independence and Kappa Alpha fraternity.  He enjoyed golfing, music, Cardinals Baseball, and wintering in Florida.  He was a constant reader of history, politics, and current events.  And he was a published writer.  Dr. Handy also established several scholarship programs to help students meet their individual goals.

Dr. Handy is survived by his wife, Mary C. Handy of Independence, Iowa, 2 daughters, Leigh Elliott of Visalia, California, and Karen (Dan) Garland of Solon, Iowa, 1 son, Mark Handy of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and 1 grandson, Evan Handy; 1 daughter-in-law, Debra Handy of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

He is also survived by 1 step daughter, Mary (David) Lyle of Overland Park, Kansas, 2 step sons, John (Mary Jo) McGrane of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Andrew (Debra) McGrane of Kildeer, Illinois, 7 step grandchildren, and 2 step great grandchildren.

In addition to his wife, he was preceded in death by his parents, 1 brother, Lt. William J. Handy, and one son, Steven, in infancy.

Funeral Services will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Friday, January 8, 2016, at the First Presbyterian Church in Independence with Rev. John Hougen officiating.  Entombment will be in Cedar Memorial Park Cemetery in Cedar Rapids.  Friends may call for visitation from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 7th, at the White Funeral Home in Independence where a Military Service begins at 6:30 p.m.

Charles B. Handy
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Charles (Chuck) Handy, passed away January 4, 2016. Chuck was the founding Dean of Iowa State’s College of Business. Chuck was a good friend to Iowa State, to the College of Business and to the many students he taught and mentored during his career in higher education.

He was born on April 26, 1924, in Coffey, Mo., the son of Herbert Franklin and Laura Ada (Mueller) Handy. He was a World War II Navy veteran. Chuck came to Iowa State University in 1958 as an instructor in the Department of Industrial Administration. For two decades following, he taught and advised a countless number of students interested in careers in the accounting profession. In 1975 he was promoted to the rank of professor and, for the next three years, served as the first director of the new Industrial Administrative Sciences graduate program.

Chuck was named the Department Chair of Industrial Administration in 1978, and subsequently led the department to being named a School of Business in 1980 (the first School at Iowa State) and ultimately, the College of Business in 1984. He provided vital leadership through that important transition. During his five years as Dean, Chuck carried out his vision to develop a foundation of high quality programs supported by outstanding faculty, staff and students.

Many people know Chuck from his regular columns in the College of Business’ Prospectus magazine. On the last page of each issue, he wrote “From the Desk of Founding Dean Charles Handy.” In his final article, he left us with these words:
“One of the great joys of my life has been my association with Iowa State University academic business program. I joined it during its infancy and, along with other dedicated personnel, helped to establish a solid program base. Its growth has been one to look to with pride. I see a great future for business education at Iowa State.”

Dr. Handy is survived by his wife, Mary C. Handy of Independence, Iowa; two daughters: Leigh Elliott of Visalia, Calif. and Karen (Dan) Garland of Solon, Iowa; one son, Mark Handy of Oklahoma City, Okla.; a grandson, Evan Handy; and a daughter-in-law, Debra Handy of Oklahoma City, Okla. He is also survived by one step daughter, Mary (David) Lyle of Overland Park, Kan.; two step sons: John (Mary Jo) McGrane of Cedar Rapids, Iowa and Andrew (Debra) McGrane of Kildeer, Illinois; seven step grandchildren; and two step great grandchildren.


Richard Roy Hansen

March 25, 1929 – September 13, 2015

Richard Roy Hansen, 86, of Ankeny, Iowa passed away at the Madrid Home on September 13, 2015 after prolonged illness from pancreatic cancer and Alzheimer's disease.

A funeral mass will be held 1:00 p.m., Friday, September 18, 2015 at Our Lady's Immaculate Heart Church, in Ankeny, IA. A visitation will be held Thursday Sept. 17th, from 5 to 7:00 p.m., with a Rosary at 4:45, and prayer service at 7:00 p.m., also at the church.

Richard was born in Shelby, Iowa on March 25, 1929.

He was proud to be an employee of the Iowa State University Agronomy Department, working on research farms in Ankeny and Ames, Iowa, until his retirement in 1991.

Richard is survived by his children; Sherri (John) Webb, Connie (William) Esker, Rick (Lisa) Hansen, and Cindy Hansen; 7 Grandchildren, 6 Great-Grandchildren, a sister, many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Roy and Frieda, an infant sister, Mary Ann, and his wife, Elizabeth.


Forrest Ilo Harlan

November 5, 1921 – January 29, 2016

Forrest Ilo Harlan, formerly of Des Moines and Ames, IA, passed away peacefully on January 29, 2016 in Centennial, CO. Forrest was born November 5, 1921 in Chapin, IA.

In 1940 he graduated from East High School in Des Moines, IA where he was a high school state wrestling champion in the 135 pound weight division.

Forrest received the Purple Heart for serving his country in WW II from 1942-1945, as a Sergeant in the Marine Corps with the Marine Raiders 1st Division in the Pacific.

Forrest was a long time resident of Ames, IA for 54 years (1955-2009) where he was employed by ISU in management for the university's Physical Plant. Forrest retired from ISU after 29 years and in retirement he continued with traveling, playing golf, reading and fishing.

Forrest is survived by his wife of 69 years Alyce Louise Harlan. Family members include Jody Harlan Shea and James Shea of Parker, CO, Stan Harlan of Des Moines, IA, 6 grandchildren, 6 great-grandchildren and Sharon King of Des Moines, IA. Forrest was preceded in death by his beloved brother, Stanley Valentine Harlan.

The family will honor Forrest's wishes to be cremated and to have no other services held. Memorials may be directed to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Forrest Ilo Harlan
Tribute by his daughter, Jody Harlan-Shea

Forrest I. Harlan (11/5/1921-1/29/2016) was employed by ISU (1/1/55-3/30/84) with the Physical Plant Department in Management.  Dad loved the diversity of the university, the students, the beauty of the campus and enjoyed walking around the campus admiring the architecture and history of the older buildings.

In the last year of dad's life, we did a lot of reminiscing and we both have the priceless memories of spending time together during Veishea...walking through all the buildings, eating the cherry pies and watching the parade. As a little girl and adult, dad and I would sit by the fountain at the student union and we would have some of the most meaningful talks about life and the importance of a college education and we also treasured our time together watching wrestling and basketball at the Armory.  

I know dad would like to say thank-you to ISU for giving him the opportunity to be a part of a great educational institution, the special friendships he made and for all the wonderful memories.


Allan “Allie” C. Helland

October 11, 1929 – June 8, 2015

Allie Helland age 85, of Ames, passed away Monday, June 8, 2015 at Mary Greeley Medical Center in Ames. A gathering of friends and family will be 4-6:00 p.m. Thursday, June 11, at Grandon Funeral and Cremation Care 414 Lincoln Way Ames, with a celebration of life funeral service at 1:30 p.m. Friday, June 12, at First United Methodist Church 6th and Kellogg in Ames.

Allie was born October 10, 1929 in Blue Earth, Minnesota and graduated from Blue Earth High School. He then joined the US Army. On May 6, in 1951, he married Virginia Loop in Fairmont, MN; Allie worked as a painter in Blue Earth, and later in Austin, MN before moving to Ames in 1962 to join Iowa State University as a painter transferring into the Maintenance Dept. before retiring in Oct. of 1990. He was a member at First United Methodist Church of Ames, Ames Moose Lodge #520, American Legion Post # 37, Allie and Virginia were avid golfers at the Oaks Golf Course, and they enjoyed dancing, cards, (Ulcer Rummy) and bowling.

He is survived by his wife Virginia Helland of Ames, a son, Brian Helland of Ames, daughters, Karen (Allan) Ratzel of Reedsburg, WI; and Shirley (Rodney) Bogenrief of Lafayette, LA; grandchildren, Linda, Brenda, and Daniel Bogenrief, Valerie McKernan, Rachael (Corey) Koehler, Curtis, and Skyla Pierson, 7 great grandchildren and a brother, Leo Helland of Blue Earth, MN.

He was preceded in death by his parents, siblings, Evelyn Smith, Arlin Helland, Orvis Helland, Twila Frisbey, and Mort Helland.

In lieu of flowers memorials may be directed to First United Methodist Church of Ames.


Richard Hegland

August 6, 1928 – December 28, 2015

A celebration of life is scheduled from 3 to 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 16, 2016, at American Legion Hall, 225 Main St., Ames, for Richard Hegland.

Richard Hegland, 87, of Ames, passed away on Dec. 28, 2015, at Mary Greeley Medical Center. Rich had a dry sense of humor and was liked by all and loved by many. He was a stand-up gentleman, loving husband, and caring Dad, Grandpa and brother. He will be greatly missed and had a positive influence on the world around him.

Rich was born Aug. 6, 1928, to Lester and Selma (Skare) in Radcliff at home. He graduated from Ames High School in 1947. He then spent seven years serving his country as a staff sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, where he was able to travel the world. He returned home and married Marilyn Walsh on April 12, 1958, at St. Thomas Aquinas in Ames. He graduated from Iowa Barber College in 1956 and was a barber at the Iowa State Memorial Union for 38 years until his retirement in 1996. He looked forward to seeing his regular customers at his house right up until his passing. He was a member of the American Legion in Ames, enjoyed watching auto racing, following Iowa State and visiting his grandkids.

Rich is survived by his wife of 57 years, Marilyn; daughter, Mary Kennedy (Kelly Cortum), and granddaughter, Sabrina; son Roger (Sherri), and grandchildren, Piper and Bode; sister, Julie Stephens; and several nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by sister, Emelie Patten; brothers-in-law, Robert (Ace) Patten and Don Stephens; and his parents, Lester and Selma.


Maribeth Ann Henney

September 8, 1935 – August 19, 2015

Maribeth Ann Henney age 79, of Ames, Iowa died Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at Heartwood House, in Ames, Iowa. Services will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, August 27, 2015 at the Collegiate United Methodist Church (2622 Lincoln Way, Ames, IA 50014). A graveside service will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, August 27, 2015 in the Greenwood Cemetery, Newton, Kansas. Maribeth Henney was born September 8, 1935, at Newton, Kansas, the daughter of Frank Leroy Henney and Gladys Irene (Lytton) Henney. Maribeth lived in Newton, Kansas until 4 years of age, at which time the family moved to Topeka. She graduated from Topeka High School in 1953, and earned a B.Ed. in 1957 and an M.Ed in 1965 from Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. She taught second and third graders at Lafayette Elementary School in Topeka from 1957-1965. She taught reading and math methods courses, and earned a PH.D. from Kent State University in Kent, Ohio in 1968. Since then, until her retirement in 1997, she was employed by Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, Iowa as a professor in the Curriculum and Instruction Department of the College of Education. Ms. Henney was a life-time member of the United Methodist Church, most recently serving at Collegiate United Methodist Church in Ames, Iowa. She played in the handbell choir at Ames since 1974, and sang alto in the voice choirs of many churches throughout her life. She previously played flute in Topeka for 20 years, and performed in the Topeka Civic Symphony Orchestra for eight years. Other hobbies included caring for her dogs; reading; sewing; doing handicrafts such as tatting, crocheting, embroidery, crewel, needlepoint; photography; music; studying about and enjoying nature; traveling; and children s literature. Memorial contributions may be made to the Collegiate United Methodist Church Endowment Fund for Maribeth Henney, 2622 Lincoln Way; Ames, Iowa, 50014, the American Cancer Society , 8364 Hickman, Suite D, Des Moines, Iowa, 50325, or to Iowa State University Foundation Maribeth Henney scholarship fund. Online condolences and thoughtful memories can be shared on Maribeth’s page at www.stevensmemorialchapel.com.


Hubert Howard Hensley

June 24, 1925 – February 27, 2015

Celebration of life services for Hubert Hensley, 89, of Harrison, Ark., and formerly of Bedford, who passed away on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Harrison, Ark., will be at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, March 4, 2015, at Ritchie Funeral Home in Bedford. Visitation will be one hour prior to services with the family greeting friends. Burial will be in Fairview Cemetery in Bedford. Memorials may be given in Hubert’s name. Memories may be shared at www.ritchiefuneralhome.com. Ritchie Funeral Home of Bedford is in charge of arrangements.

Hubert Howard Hensley was born June 24, 1925, in Ross Township, Taylor County, Bedford. He was the son of George Dewey and Lillian Bernice Hensley, brother to Albert, Coryl and Dean. During his childhood, he attended rural school in Ross Township through the eighth grade, graduating from Bedford High School in 1943. As a youth, Hubert was baptized at the Christian Disciples of Christ Church in Bedford. Activities he enjoyed included FFA, 4-H and being a member of the County Extension Council. He joined his father in operating the family farm and continued until his marriage to Norma Park in August 1949. To this union, Hubert and Norma brought four children into the world: Jeffrey Howard, Jennifer Sue, Julie Kaye and Jack Lacy.

During the decade of the 50s, Hubert farmed south of Bedford. In the late 1950s, he decided to pursue a degree in animal science at Iowa State University. After selling the farming operation, Hubert moved his family to Ames and spent the next six years attending college and working for the university. After a great deal of commitment to successfully earn his degree, he graduated in 1966. Hubert’s first job in his new career was as superintendent of Iowa State University’s Beef Research Farm. In 1974, he became the manager of the Rayl Purebred Angus Beef Herd in Bridgewater. His next career move took him to the Iowa State Beef Research Farm in Newell.

Upon his retirement in 1991, he moved to Harrison, Ark., to join his second wife, Erena. He spent his golden years of retirement designing and tending to his lovely flower gardens. Hubert was passionate about reading with a special interest in history. He never missed an opportunity to spend time with his family, gathering for many special celebrations throughout the years.

Hubert was a humble, honest man with a belief that a strong work ethic is the most powerful characteristic a person can possess. He had high standards for himself and his family, teaching his children that integrity and compassion are to be valued. Hubert took great pride in watching his children grow into young adults, making positive choices and developing their own strong level of integrity. He valued the contribution all people make to society, for the greater good, so that everyone can pursue their passion successfully.

Education was a priority in Hubert’s life. His choice to become the first person in his family to earn a college degree created a legacy that has lived on more than four decades. He passed his value for education onto each of his children and grandchildren. His belief that knowledge is necessary to build successful relationships and pursue life’s dreams is being passed on from one generation to another in the Hensley family.

Those family members include his wife, Erena; his children Jeff and wife Vicki, of Clear Lake, Jennifer Yoder and husband Gary, of Owatonna, Minn., Julie Lindstrom and husband Bill, of Cheyenne, Wyo., and Jack and wife Julie, of Savage, Minn. Loving grandchildren include Julie Yoder and husband Jamie, Daniel Yoder, Jill Chi and husband Andy, Ross Lindstrom and Jenn, Katie and Stephanie Hensley, Adam and Ben Hensley. Great-grandchildren include Annika and Anessa Yoder-Stoulil, Malin and Soren Lindstrom and Ellie Chi. A surviving brother, Dean, of Dows City, and sister in-law Anna of Goodman, Mo. Step-daughters include Debra Schroeter and husband Larry, Penny Lea and husband John, Karen Maiden, all of Hollister, Mo., and Kelli Kenyon, of Branson, Mo.

He was preceded in death by his parents, George Dewey Hensley and Bernice Lacy Hensley; one brother, Albert Hensley; one sister, Coryl Cox and husband, James and step-daughter Marla Maiden.

“Children are the message parents send to a future they will never know.


Paul Jacob “PJ” Hermann

September 30, 1923 – May 29, 2015

Paul “PJ” Hermann died May 29, 2015, at Israel Family Hospice House in Ames.

Paul was born September 30, 1923, in Sheldahl, Iowa, the oldest of John and Ellen Hermann’s four boys. He grew up on a farm near Sheldahl. One of Paul’s most “life turning” events took place at the at the 4th of July celebration in 1932 when he was able to ride in an open cockpit plane with a barnstormer, cementing his interest in aeronautics and his resolve to fly again. He did finally earn his pilot’s license at age 51 and was an active member of the Ames Airmen.

Paul graduated from Sheldahl High School, and went on to Iowa State College to study engineering. His studies were interrupted by WWII work as a radio technician in the Philippines while serving in the Navy. Returning to Iowa State, Paul graduated with a degree in aeronautical engineering in 1947, then taught in the engineering department while earning an MS degree in 1951.

Paul worked for the Goodyear Aircraft Corporation in Akron, Ohio, before returning to Iowa State University to teach and continue his studies. He taught aerospace engineering for the next 33 years, helping to take the department from slide rules to computers, writing the department newsletter, and finally writing a history of the aerospace department, “One Person’s Story”.

Frances Juskiewicz and Paul were married in September of 1951 and raised three daughters in their 43 years of marriage. His interest in family led him to become the family genealogist, which included trips to Switzerland and Norway to meet relatives there.

Family tradition was important to Paul. Sunday dinners with his children and grandchildren were held at his house for years. He and his brothers also kept up the now 80-year tradition of family gathering at Iowana Beach in northern Minnesota. The tradition is now into its 5th generation and has included an annual steak fry in honor of his father.

Paul pitched on softball teams into his 70’s, bowled until in his 80’s, and played bridge in a group for over 50 years. He also served as the master of ceremonies for 4th of July celebrations in Sheldahl.

Retiring from Iowa State University in 1993, Paul returned to ISU’s campus last year to receive two prestigious honors. In addition to throwing him his 90th birthday party, the Aerospace Department added Paul to their ‘Wall of Fame’ in Howe Hall, placing a plaque that describes the “unparalleled learning environment” he created in both curriculum and student relationships. He also received the Faculty-Staff Inspiration Award from the ISU Alumni Association. Paul has left a legacy that will continue to influence those who knew him. For an undergraduate who described his early studies as those of “blazing mediocrity,” his legacy could now be described by a favorite word of his, “Remarkable.”

Paul was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Frances, and his brother and sister-in-law, John and Harriet Hermann. He is survived by his daughters, Paula Hermann, Laura Veach (Cary), and Karla Hermann (Dave Richardson), four granddaughters, Brianne Osborn (Brandon), Audey Veach (Brian Lewis), Emily Veach (Jon Marshall), and Kelsey Veach Shoaff (Justin), five great- grandchildren, and his brothers Robert Hermann (Darlene) and Jim Hermann (Jean).

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to The Aerospace Engineering Excellence Fund through the ISU Foundation, the Slater Historical Association, or the Sheldahl Cemetery Association.

Paul Jacob “PJ” Hermann
Tribute by his daughter, Paula Hermann

Paul was born September 30, 1923, in Sheldahl, Iowa, the oldest of John and Ellen Hermann’s four boys. He grew up on a farm near Sheldahl. One of Paul’s most “life turning” events took place at the at the 4th of July celebration in 1932 when he was able to ride in an open cockpit plane with a barnstormer, cementing his interest in aeronautics and his resolve to fly again. He did finally earn his pilot’s license at age 51 and was an active member of the Ames Airmen.

Paul graduated from Sheldahl High School, and went on to Iowa State College to study engineering. His studies were interrupted by WWII work as a radio technician in the Philippines while serving in the Navy. Returning to Iowa State, Paul graduated with a degree in aeronautical engineering in 1947, then taught in the engineering department while earning an MS degree in 1951.

Paul worked for the Goodyear Aircraft Corporation in Akron, Ohio, before returning to Iowa State University to teach and continue his studies. He taught aerospace engineering for the next 33 years, helping to take the department from slide rules to computers, writing the department newsletter, and finally writing a history of the aerospace department, “One Person’s Story”.

Frances Juskiewicz and Paul were married in September of 1951 and raised three daughters in their 43 years of marriage. His interest in family led him to become the family genealogist, which included trips to Switzerland to meet relatives there.

Paul pitched on softball teams into his 70’s, bowled until in his 80’s, and played bridge in a group for over 50 years. He also served as the master of ceremonies for 4th of July celebrations in Sheldahl.

Retiring from Iowa State University in 1993, Paul returned to ISU’s campus to receive two prestigious honors. The Aerospace Department added Paul to their ‘Wall of Fame’ in Howe Hall, placing a plaque that describes the “unparalleled learning environment” he created in both curriculum and student relationships. He also received the Faculty-Staff Inspiration Award from the ISU Alumni Association. Paul has left a legacy that will continue to influence those who knew him. For an undergraduate who described his early studies as those of “blazing mediocrity,” his legacy could now be described by a favorite word of his, “Remarkable.”

Paul “PJ” Hermann died May 29, 2015, at Israel Family Hospice House in Ames.


Helen A. Herrnstadt

March 20, 1928 – July 8, 2015

Helen A. Herrnstadt passed away July 8, 2015, in Tucson, Ariz., at the age of 87. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Richard.

Helen was born in Chicago, Ill., on March 20, 1928. She attended the University of Wisconsin and earned a degree in speech pathology and elementary education in 1949.

She was a school speech correctionist in Lisle, IIl., until she and Richard were married in Chicago on June 18, 1950. They lived in Maryland, where Richard was in graduate school. In 1954, they moved to Ames.

For over 45 years, Helen was a leader in the Ames arts community. She acted and directed in productions for Iowa State University Theater, ACTORS, Cheese and Puppets, and the Ames Women’s Theater, which she co-founded in 1976. Her credits include, Linda in “Death of a Salesmen,” Mrs. Soames in “Our Town,“ Beatrice in Man in the Moon Marigolds,” “Yenta in Fiddler on the Roof,” as well as numerous other productions.

She held a position with Iowa State University as an Academic Advisor in the College of Letters and Sciences from 1968 until her retirement in 1991.

After retiring from ISU, she moved with Richard to Tucson, Ariz., in 1995, where she continued her involvement in volunteer activities.

In addition to Richard, she is survived by her children, Steven Herrnstadt and his wife, Mary, of Ames; Ellen “Sara” Herrnstadt Crosby and her husband, Daniel, of Sioux Falls, S.D.; and Owen Herrnstadt and his wife, Stacey Grundman, of Bethesda, MD. She is also survived by eight grandchildren, Zachary, Evan (his wife Karen) and Caitlin Herrnstadt; Iain, Cameron and Tessa Crosby; and Eli and Dana Herrnstadt.

A memorial service is planned for a later date.


Carleta M. Herzberger

August 14, 1929 – November 3, 2015
 
Carleta M. Herzberger, 86, of Anamosa, formerly of Toddville, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015, at Jones Regional Medical Center surrounded by her family. Per Carleta’s wishes, there will not be a formal service.

The family greeted friends from 11:00 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 8, at the Toddville American Legion during a Celebration of Life. A private family inurnment took place at the Dunkard Cemetery in Toddville, by Pastor Mark Loftquist.

Arrangements were handled by Murdoch Funeral Home and Cremation Service, Marion.

Carleta is survived by nine of her children, Mary Weis of Cedar Rapids, Marlys Shaw of Anamosa, Mindy Cornwell of Marion, David Herzberger of Toddville, Megan (Tom) Updegraff of Toddville, Denton Herzberger of Cedar Rapids, Maureen (Dave) Sweeney of Walker, Molly Jordan of Toddville, and Devin (Angie) Herzberger of Toddville; 20 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; brothers and sisters; and many nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her husband; daughter, Michele Herzberger; her parents; son-in-law, Stan Jordan; and brother, John.

Carleta was born Aug. 14, 1929, the daughter of Carl Wilbur and Mary Louise (Postel) Morning in Anamosa. She graduated from Monticello High School. On Feb. 5, 1949, she married Keith Herbert Herzberger in Cedar Rapids. Carleta was employed by the Iowa State Extension Service for many years, until retiring in 1986. Carleta was a member of the Toddville American Legion Post No. 674 Auxiliary. She will be fondly remembered as a good neighbor, a loving wife, mother and grandmother and for her famous popcorn balls.

We wish to extend a special thank you to the Jones Regional Medical Center and staff for the kind and compassionate care they gave our mother and family. They went above and beyond with their services.


Philip Paul Hufferd

December 29, 1936 – January 4, 2016

Philip was born on December 29, 1936 and passed away on Monday, January 4, 2016. Philip was a resident of Cedar Falls, Iowa at the time of his passing.

Philip Paul Hufferd
Tribute by his wife, Joyce Hufferd

ISU work experience:
Phil took a lot of pride in helping farm families transition successfully through the Intergenerational land transfer process. Transferring the farm to the next generation required working with the entire family to develop a business plan considering not only the economic & financial impact, but paying special attention to preserving family harmony. He felt honored to see these families develop and implement their plan for future generations. He had a gift for sitting them down to work together for a harmonious and successful future.

Personal memory:
He was dedicated to his work for ISU in Agriculture Extension for 37 years. He was pleased to know before his death that a granddaughter would be going to ISU this Fall.


Norman Leonard Jacobson

September 11, 1918 – May 14, 2015

Norman L. Jacobson, 96, passed away on Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Eugene, Ore. He was born in Eau Claire, Wis., on Sept. 11, 1918, and spent his youth on the family farm. He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1940 and subsequently master’s and doctorate degrees from Iowa State University in Ames.

Norman had a long and illustrious career as a professor of dairy science and as an administrator at Iowa State University before he retired in 1989. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, much of the time as a navigator on the USS Yukon. In 2011, Norman moved in with his son and daughter-in-law in Eugene, Ore., and for the last few months, he resided at Farmington Square Senior Living Community in Eugene.

He is survived by one son, Gary, of Eugene, Ore. He was preceded in death by his wife, Gertrude (Trudy), and one daughter, Judy.

Norman Leonard Jacobson
Tribute by his son, Gary Jacobson

ISU work experience:
Animal Science faculty, 1947-1989. Numerous administrative positions including Dean of the Graduate College, Associate VP for Research and Associate Provost.

Highlight of their employment:
Probably when Dad came out of retirement in 1990 to become Interim Chair of the newly created Department of Food Science and Nutrition. He finally retired for good in 1992!

Personal memory:
Dad was completely dedicated to both his work and his family. During the last years of his life, when he began suffering from dementia, he lived with my wife and me here in Eugene, Oregon.

Other thoughts to share:
Dad was a navigator on the USS Yukon during WW II. He often related the story of his ship being hit by a torpedo from a German U-boat near Iceland and the crew's efforts to bring the ship safely back into port.


Terril “Terry” W. Jennings

April 29, 1941 – September 24, 2015

Terril "Terry" Jennings, 74, of Cambridge, passed away Thursday, September 24, 2015, at Iowa Methodist Medical Center in Des Moines.

Terry was born April 29, 1941, in Des Moines to Wilbur and Kathryn (McHone) Jennings. He graduated from Ballard High School in 1959 and had worked as a temperature controller at Iowa State for 30 years. On July 16, 1987, he was untied in marriage to Barbara Klonglan in Sheldahl. Terry had been active with the Cambridge Volunteer Fire Department and enjoyed the New York Yankees and the Iowa Hawkeyes.

He is survived by his wife, Barb of Cambridge; his son, Wayne Jennings (Angie Doud) of Cambridge; his daughters: Twila (Jeff) Longnecker of Ames, Becky Jennings of Huxley and TerriLe (Patrick) Spratt of Parnell; his grandchildren: Chasity (Matthew) Coover, Kayle (Kent) Wierson, Sydnee Longnecker, Janey (Jacob) Stahl, Taylor Jennings, Lindsey Spratt, Mackenzie Jennings, Nicolas Spratt, Garrett Longnecker, Lucas Spratt, Wil Jennings, Mae Jennings and Jacy Jennings; and five great-grandchildren.

Terry was preceded in death by his parents; his brother, Ronald Jennings; his sister-in-law, Judy Jennings; his sister, Earline Sydnes; and his step-father, Reuben Larson.

Visitation will be 5-7 p.m. Sunday, September 27, at Bacon Funeral Home in Nevada. Graveside services will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 28, at Cambridge Cemetery in Cambridge.

Memorials may be made to the Terry Jennings Memorial Fund.

Bacon Funeral Home in Nevada is handling arrangements.


Charles William Jones

January 9, 1927 – November 11, 2015

Charles William Jones died at Israel House Hospice in Ames, IA on Wednesday, November 11, 2015.

A visitation will be held on Friday, November 14, 2015 from 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm, at St. Thomas Aquinas (2210 Lincoln Way, Ames, Iowa 50014) a vigil service will begin at 5:30 pm. Funeral Services will be held at 10:30 am on Saturday November 14, at St. Thomas Aquinas. Burial will follow services in the Glenwood Cemetery in Ogden, Iowa.

Charles was born on January 9, 1927 in Ogden, IA to William Dude and Fredricka (Riggie) Jones. He grew up and attended school in Ogden. At the age of 17 he enlisted and then served in the U.S. Navy from 1944 to 1946 active duty. He remained on inactive duty until 1954. During his service, he served on the USS Colorado, one of the first ships to sail into Tokyo bay after Japan surrendered. He also sailed on the USS Southerland destroyer and USS Frank Knox destroyer.

Upon resuming civilian life, Charles attended Boone Junior College for one year. He then transferred to Iowa State University where he completed a bachelor's degree in education. Charles taught science, math, and shop at Boxholm, IA for three years. In 1950 and during his tenure at Boxholm schools, he met Margaret Wehrheim, who had joined the school district as the new kindergarten teacher.

Charles and Margaret nurtured a ten year courtship. Margaret taught kindergarten at Boxholm and then at Winterset; continued her college education at University of Northern Iowa; and then earned a bachelor's degree in Sociology from ISU. Charles taught at Des Moines Lincoln High School, and then, in 1957, he obtained a Masters degree in one year at ISU majoring in both teaching and school administration. Charles went on to earn his PhD in education counseling from ISU in 1972.

He taught and provided counseling services at the ISU Counseling Center from 1957 to 1992 – 35 years. He also taught graduate students in Council Bluffs and Omaha, as well as provided counseling services to war veterans living at the Knoxville Veterans Hospital. He and his dear colleague Dan McMillan conducted research in education testing methods and published many academic papers during their time at ISU.

Charles Jones and Margaret Wehrheim married August 25, 1960. They built their lives together on an acreage four miles south of Ames and expertly cultivated bountiful gardens. In 1964, they adopted their daughter Rebecca Anne (Becky). In 1966, they adopted their son Michael William. The family was active at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Ames as well as the United Community School District between Ames and Boone. Charles served on the United Community Schools Board for 15 years. Margaret died in 1987 just five years before Charles retired from ISU.

Charles' retirement career was devoted to his passions for music, theater and his faith. For over 50 years he "clowned around" in parades in Bussey, Ogden and Slater, and dressed up as Santa for his family, friends and nearby community of Kelley. He sang and served in leadership positions with the Ames Choral Society for more than 40 years. He was active with Actors Theater troupe before becoming a founding leader in the Heartland Senior Variety Show – helping to raise nearly a quarter-million-dollars for services and support for older adults in Story County. Charles was on the production team and also the emcee for the Variety Show for all 21 years, including this August. Charles was lay-leader and devoted member of the St. Thomas church choir. He also took a leadership role in the St. Thomas Aquinas student work trips to help families living in isolated communities in the Kentucky Appalachian Mountains for over 15 years. Earlier this year, Charles received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Ames Cultural Society.

To know Charles was to love him, and to be loved by him. He was a friend to all, counselor to many, and true servant of his community. He was preceded in death by his brothers James, John, Roy, and his sister Maxine. Profoundly grateful and impacted by his amazing life are his daughter Becky (John) and son Michael (Sharon), granddaughters Samantha, Sabrina (Steve), Krista; grandsons Jesse, Jacob (Logann), and Jordan; great-grandchildren Trevor, Andrew, Caleb, Tristan, Kaylee, Kayden, Aidan, Samara, Zaydian, and Paige.

Online condolences and thoughtful memories may be shared on Charles page at www.stevensmemorialchapel.com. Memorial contributions may be directed towards St. Thomas Aquinas, The Senior Variety Show, or the Ames Choral Society.


Elizabeth “Bettie” Ellen Kiser

April 30, 1922 – August 14, 2015

Elizabeth (Bettie) Ellen Dawson Kiser died the morning of August 14, 2015. She was born on April 30, 1922 in Vermillion, South Dakota, the daughter of Joseph Charles Dawson IV and Mabel Geneva Armstrong Dawson. Bettie graduated from Vermillion High School in 1940 and received her bachelor's degree in Home Economics Education from South Dakota State University in Brookings in 1944. She met James Joy Kiser in 1946 in Chicago where he was coaching the SDSU livestock judging team. They were married in Vermillion on September 15, 1947.

Jim and Bettie moved to Ames in 1951 when Jim was hired as a professor of Animal Science at Iowa State University. Bettie went to work the following year at ISU in 4-H Extension. Kathy was born in 1954 and Janice in 1955. After her daughters were in school, Bettie re-entered the professional world in 1962 at ISU following her passion of working with young people as a freshman advisor in the college of Home Economics.

Bettie was actively involved in her daughter's lives taking on such duties as church choir mother, Camp Fire and 4-H leader, dance recital costume maker, and chauffer extraordinaire. She never missed a concert, recital or event. One of her favorite family activities was riding horses with Jim, Kathy and Jan. Bettie had SO many interests. Among them she loved sewing Chanel suits with matching shoes, baking pies of all kinds, arranging flowers from her garden in a cut-glass vase, and decorating her home for Christmas.

Bettie belonged to professional organizations such as Faculty Women's Club and AAUW. She was an advisor for the Animal Science Student Wives. Bettie was an avid bridge player and enjoyed playing in several women's clubs, plus she and Jim were part of a beloved couples dinner bridge club. They also enjoyed dancing, founded a square dance group, and were long-time members of Red Friars.

Bettie's family includes her loving and devoted husband of 67 years, Jim, daughter and son-in-law Kathy and Jay Light, daughter and son-in-law Jan and Bruce Frank, Jay's son Richard Light, granddaughter Abby Frank and grandson Evan Frank. She is also survived by her younger sister Marilyn Maurice Dawson Woolridge. Bettie was preceded in death by her parents, sister Evelyn Dawson Park Lee, and brother Joseph Charles Dawson V.

Funeral arrangements are being made by Adams and Soderstrum Funeral Home, Ames Iowa. There will be a visitation for Bettie on Thursday, August 20, at 1:00 pm followed by a memorial service at 2:00 pm, both at Collegiate United Methodist Church, 2622 Lincoln Way, Ames, Iowa.

In lieu of flowers, gifts may be directed to: the Story County 4-H Endowment in memory of Bettie Kiser. Send them to: The 4-H Foundation, Extension 4-H Youth Building, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3630.

Elizabeth “Bettie” Ellen Kiser
Tribute by her daughter, Katherine Kiser Light

Elizabeth (Bettie) Ellen Dawson Kiser was born on April 30, 1922 in Vermillion, South Dakota.  She received her bachelor’s degree in Home Economics Education from South Dakota State University in 1944 and married James Kiser in 1947. Jim and Bettie moved to Ames in 1951 when Jim was hired as a professor of Animal Science at Iowa State University.  Bettie went to work the following year at ISU in 4-H Extension.  I was born in 1954, my sister in 1955, and when we were in school, she returned to work at Iowa State as a freshman advisor in the College of Home Economics.

Mom loved working with young people and was passionate about helping them reach their full potential.  4-H Extension and advising were perfect jobs for her.  As a very young girl, I also remember her working with foreign students helping them find their way at Iowa State. She would include us in some of the things she did with them - it was a wonderful experience for all of us.

Bettie Kiser (Mom) passed away August 14, 2015.


John Calvin Kleitsch

September 8, 1933 – May 13, 2015

John C. Kleitsch was born September 8, 1933, to Mabel and Lawrence Kleitsch in rural Iowa. John served his country in the U.S. Army in the Korean War, then graduated Iowa State University with a degree in electrical engineering. He earned master degrees in electrical engineering and business administration from the University of Iowa. His first position was with Boeing in Seattle, Washington. He then went to work for Collins Radio in Los Angeles, taking digital design courses at the University of Washington and UCLA. After 23 years in telecommunications design at Rockwell Collins, John taught digital circuit design for 21 years in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Iowa State University. He co-authored at least three patents. As a consultant at Motorola, John’s project involved the use of satellites to control railroad traffic.

John was a member of St. John's Catholic Church in Independence, St. Matthew Catholic Parish in Cedar Rapids, and St. Cecilia Catholic Church in Ames. He always found a Catholic church to attend on the family camping vacations to Yellow River State Forest, the east and west coasts and points in between. Visiting friends Paul and Sonya Burke, Don and Velma Stover, and family and reunions of the Kleitsch and Rhoads families were important to him and Ruby. John loved to fish for rainbow trout, plant a garden, and hike a trail with his family.

John passed away at 81 years of age on May 13, 2015, at Bethany Manor in Story City.

He is survived by his children, Carol Kleitsch-Santos, Deanna (Chris) Eckert (Michigan), Randal (Nancy) Kleitsch (Wisconsin), Susan Houseman (North Carolina), and Dennis Kleitsch; and his sisters, Dorothy (Don) Gannon, Darlene (Jim) Schrader (Wisconsin), Janet Kleitsch, Mary Lou Adams, and Phyl (Ken) Osterhaus.

John was preceded in death by his wife of 61 years, Ruby, who passed away on April 7, 2015; his daughter, Mary Schrier, who passed away February 25, 2015; two sisters, Shirley Jensen and Lettie May; and three brothers, Russ, LaVerne, and James.


Ruby Myrl Kleitsch

December 5, 1931 – April 4, 2015

Ruby Rhoads Kleitsch was born December 5, 1931 to Guy and Rosa Rhoads in Nevada, Iowa. Ruby attended Iowa State University and Kirkwood Community College. She worked at Echo Lake Lodge in Estes Park, CO and Sanford's Office Supply and Killian's department store in Cedar Rapids. She also volunteered on behalf of her children, in civic zoning issues, and was in the League of Women Voters in Cedar Rapids. She was a six-year breast cancer survivor.

Ruby passed away in early morning Tuesday, April 7, 2015 at Bethany Manor in Story City at 83 years of age.

She leaves behind her husband of 61 years, John Kleitsch, of Story City; her children, Carol Kleitsch-Santos, of Ames, Deanna (Chris) Eckert, of Michigan, Randal (Nancy) Kleitsch, of Wisconsin, Susan Houseman, of North Carolina, and Dennis Kleitsch, of Cedar Rapids; her sisters, Caltha (Wayne) Schreurs, of Nebraska and Mary (Bill) Corbin, of Arizona; her sister-in-law, Pat Rhoads, of Nebraska; seventeen grandchildren; four great-grandsons; and many cousins, nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her daughter, Mary Rosalind Schrier on February 25; and her brother, Dean Rhoads.

Burial of the cremated remains will be at a later date in the Nevada Municipal Cemetery.


Darlene Sue Koster

November 28, 1931 – November 27, 2014

Darlene Sue Koster, 82, of Elkader, passed away peacefully on Nov. 27, 2014, with her family by her side.

Darlene was born Nov. 28, 1931, in Breda, Iowa, the daughter of A.J. and Elizabeth (Schulte) Wolterman. She spent her younger years in the Breda area and graduated from St. Bernard's School in 1949. Darlene was a nurse's aide in surgery at St. Anthony's Hospital in Carroll, Iowa, until she married the love of her life, Roger Koster, on June 15, 1955, at St. Bernard's Church in Breda.

Darlene was gentle and loving. She never had anything but a kind word to or for anyone – "We are all God's children." With her strong Christian faith, Darlene possessed a great love for her family and friends, especially her grandchildren and great- grandchildren, who were perfect in her eyes.

Darlene enjoyed baking and sharing her favorites with others. She also was a gifted seamstress – sewing, mending and altering clothing for her family and working on many projects for the St. Joseph's Crafters.

Darlene had a love for nature and gladly shared her beautiful roses with the many deer visiting her flower bed. Darlene spent hours sitting in the stands and seats at sporting events, music concerts and plays supporting her children and grandchildren.

Darlene enjoyed reading, spending time with family and friends and taking trips up north to see who could catch the biggest fish between her and Roger.

Darlene served as co-coordinator for the religious education program at St. Joseph's Church for 16 years and taught religious education classes other years. She was a member of St. Joseph's Crafters, St. Joseph's Guild, St. Joseph's Choir, Central Community Hospital Auxiliary and American Legion Auxiliary. She also served on the Four Oaks board at the Elkader Country Club and volunteered with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts.

Darlene is survived by her husband of 59 years, Roger of Elkader; her children, Stanley of Palo, Suzanne (Pat) Hyde of Urbandale, William (Lisa) of Huntington Beach, Calif., Nancy (Tom) Healy of Elkader and Daniel (Kris) of Van Meter; nine grandchildren, Ryan (Emily) Hyde and Amanda (Stuart) Kunkel, Tyler Koster, Andrew, Danielle and Elizabeth Healy, Bryon, Owen and Benjamin Koster; two great-grandchildren, Landon Kunkel and Elizabeth Hyde; one sister, Mildred McCoy of Fonda; and sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law, Rita Wolterman of Adams, Minn., Lucy Wolterman of Jefferson, Arlene and Dennis Alspach of Carroll, Dolores Koster of Breda, Marvin and Maxine Heinrichs of Fulda, Minn., Cletus and Ruth Heinrichs of Marshalltown and Leroy and Joanell Koster of Breda.

Darlene was preceded in death by her parents; seven brothers, Harold, Wilbur, Lester, Richard, Elmer, Joe and Raphael Wolterman; and three sisters, Bernice Steinkamp, Elsie Koster and Marita Neppl.

Memorials may be given to Central Community Hospital Foundation, Central Ambulance Service, St. Jude Hospice or St. Joseph's Religious Education Program.

Visitation will be Sunday, Nov. 30, from 2 to 5 p.m. at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Elkader, with a 5 p.m. parish Scripture service. Visitation also will be one hour before mass time at the church on Monday. Mass of Christian Burial will be Monday, Dec. 1, at 10:30 a.m. at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Elkader. The Very Rev. Paul R. Peters will be the celebrant. Burial will follow in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Elkader.

Condolences may be left with www.leonard funeralhomes.com.
Leonard Funeral Home and Cremation Service of Elkader is assisting the family with arrangements.

Darlene Sue Koster
Tribute by her husband, Roger Koster

As is so true for the Valiant Women of Darlene's age group, they truly were the best.

As my girlfriend, waited for me during my Army service in the Korean War, renewed our courtship on my return, only to wait for me again 14 months as I fought Tuberculosis I had caught from the War. Then our marriage in 1955. We started, living in ISC’s Pammel Court, I as a DAV student graduating in Agronomy. With my Agronomy career jobs, moved to four different locations in Iowa in 38 years.

With her Patience and Love Abounding, raised our family of five, was available in all communities for important volunteer jobs. These were the BEST YEARS, only to be tried herself with severe health problems. Tumors/Cancer plagued her from late 1988 the rest of her life. From 1989 through 2011, she accepted and survived three surgeries, and three Radiation sessions, followed in 2011 by four more years of monthly debilitating injections until death.

Appropriately, God called her HOME ON THANKSGIVING DAY 2015. No one could have been more Blessed, and Thankful to share my life with Darlene than I.      
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Darlene's LIFETIME MOTTO as she never had anything but a kind word to or for anyone:  "We are all God's Children". Darlene loved everybody and you would have loved her too, a Million Dollar smile for you!!!!

I and Darlene (from Heaven) send our Love and Prayers for all being Remembered today, as we do for all of their loved ones also.  Roger A. Koster   


Lorene Jeanette Larson

October 9, 1916 – February 27, 2015

Lorene Jeanette Larson was born on October 9, 1916 to Selmer and Anna (Hanson) Sansgaard in Marshalltown, Iowa. Lorene married Chester A. Larson on October 18, 1936. She worked 22 years as a lab technician at the Iowa State University Veterinary Clinic. Lorene was a member of Immanuel Lutheran Church in Story City, the L.C.W. and had lived most of her life in the Story City area. She enjoyed sewing, cooking and baking and was known for her banana bread. Lorene loved her family very much.

Lorene passed away at 98 years of age on February 27, 2015 at Bethany Manor in Story City.

Lorene is survived by her daughter, Carol Ann (Roy) Shafer of Norwalk; her son, Vernon (Ernine) Larson, of Burbank, California; three grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and one sister, Erma Jean Brown, of Columbia, Missouri.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Chester, on January 14, 1974; her grandson, Chad Larson; her son, Richard Larson; and two sisters, Eunice Sansgaard and Stella Cossey.

Memorials may be designated to Immanuel Lutheran Church or Bethany Life Communities.


Nancy Ann Lewis

December 21, 1926 – June 30, 2015

Nancy Ann Lewis, 88, died peacefully June 30th at the Israel Family Hospice House and Home Care, Ames, IA.

Nancy was born in Des Moines to Raymon and Mildred (Menefee) Bailie. She graduated from Roosevelt High School in 1944 and Drake University in 1975 with a Bachelor of General Studies degree.

She was an avid traveler and between business and leisure visited England, Scandinavia, Spain, Germany, Australia, Japan, China, Mexico, Panama, Hawaii, Canada, Alaska, various contiguous United States and the Caribean.

She was a Charter Member of the Douglas Avenue Presbyterian Church in Des Moines; belonged to the Sun Dial Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Delta Chapter of Theta Chi; Psoroptomist International; HN Chapter of PEO; Order of the Knoll (Campanile Guild); Faculty Womens Club; Daughters of the Nile and the Embrorders Guild of America.

She was a 20-year employee of the Social Security Administration of the United States.

She is survived by her husband, Robert Earl; two sisters Carolyn Ruth Jury, Dwight, IL; Martha Jane Lund, Elk Rapids, MI; and three stepchildren from a previous marriage; George Judisch, Iowa City, IA, Janifer Judisch, Safety Harbor, FL and James Judisch, Rochester, MN.

Her ashes will be deposited in the Iowa State University family plot on campus.

Nancy was a warm and loving person and she will be sorely missed by her family and those who knew her.


Linda Lou Mataya

September 5, 19247 – June 23, 2015

Linda Lou Mataya, 67, of Madrid, Iowa, passed away suddenly on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 surrounded by her family at the University Of Iowa Hospitals, in Iowa City, IA. The family will greet friends from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 28, at St. Malachy's Catholic Church, located at 405 Gerald Street in Madrid. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, June 29, at the church, with burial following at Mt. Hope Cemetery, south of Madrid. She was born on September 5, 1947, in Des Moines, the second of five children to LuVerne and Mildred (Engen) Fitch of Slater. Linda graduated from Ballard High School in 1966 and went on to marry the love of her life, David Mataya on May 18, 1968. She retired from Iowa State University in 2006. Linda enjoyed attending her grandchildren's sporting events, shopping with her granddaughter, and making her famous chocolate chip cookies for friends and family. Linda will be remembered for her laughter, smile, and her generous heart. She is survived by her husband, David Mataya of Madrid; two children, Angie (Todd) Fallon of Powell, OH and Matt (Shera) Mataya of Madrid; four grandchildren, Paige Fallon, Adam Fallon, Tyler Mataya, and Trevor Mataya; three sisters, Sharon Ihle of Slater, Charlotte (Doug) Duhn of Ankeny and Judy Fitch of Woodward; brother, Richard (Mary) Fitch of Ames; aunt, Dorothy Denton of Ankeny; uncle, Roger Engen of Ames; and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. Linda was preceded in death by her parents. In lieu of flowers, the family has respectfully requested that any memorial donations be directed to: The Linda Lou Mataya Memorial Fund in Palliative Care, The University of Iowa Foundation, P.O. Box 4550, Iowa City, Iowa 52244-4550.


Lowell K. Mathison

September 8, 1935 – May 18, 2015

Lowell K. Mathison age 79, of Ames, died May 18, 2015 at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, a celebration of his life will be 11:00 am Friday May 22nd, at United Church of Christ Congregational, 6th and Kellogg in Ames. Inurnment will be at Ames Municipal Cemetery.

Lowell was born September 8, 1935 on the family farm in Baldwin, WI; the son of Levi and Lettie Mathison. He graduated from Roberts High School and received his BS in Biology from University of Wisconsin/River Falls in 1961. On June 23, 1962 he married Heather Lea Berggren in Roberts, WI and she preceded him in death on December 26, 1995. Lowell and Heather moved to Ames in 1962 when he started at Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University retiring in 1997, as manager of the Laboratory's Environment, Safety and Health Group. He then was the building superintendent at United Church of Christ Congregational until 2009. He also enjoyed volunteering teaching beginning computers of Iowa State University College for Seniors.

Lowell enjoyed traveling to Norway, California, Arizona, Black Hills, Washington DC, and Door County WI. He enjoyed his Amateur Ham Radio, Radio Control Airplanes, gardening, being the on call care giver to his granddaughters, Heather and Morgan, and trying to make lefse, his words of wisdom were "life is short, eat lefse first."

Lowell is survived by his children, Andrea Mathison Egeland and Mark Mathison both of Ames, granddaughters, Heather and Morgan, longtime companion Carol Slater of Ames, sisters, Doris (Emery) Sobottka of Ames, Harriet (Herbert) Day of Sturgeon Bay, WI; and Gail Mathison of Madison, WI.

He was preceded in death by his parents and his wife Heather.
Memorials may be directed to: Ames United Church of Christ Congregational


Francis “Frank” C. Mitchels

December 12, 1940 – September 17, 2015

Francis “Frank” C. Mitchels, age 74 of 1627 Linn Street in Boone, Iowa passed away at Boone County Hospital on Thursday morning, September 17, 2015.

He was born on December 12, 1940 in Boone, the son of Edward Austin Mitchels and Patricia Ilene (Hampton) Lee.

On June 4, 1988, he married Sheryl Elvert in Boone.

Frank was a graduate of Boone High School and worked many years as a maintenance technician, most recently at Iowa State University, until his retirement in 2002. Frank loved golf, woodworking, and working endless crossword puzzles. He was devoted to his children and grandchildren and loved going to sporting events to cheer for them. He was the grandpa and great-grandpa that everyone loved to visit and usually had a lapful of toddlers. A cherished husband, father, brother and friend, he will be remembered for his library of off-color jokes, songs and wonderful sense of humor.

He was preceded in death by his parents; sister, Joyce Dearborn, of Boone; and brother, Jerry Mitchels, of Tacoma.

Survivors include his wife, Sheryl Mitchels of Boone; six children Bill (Diane) Mitchels of Ogden, Iowa, Rich (Rochelle) Mitchels of Rippey, Iowa, Laura (Michael) Myers of Boone, Larry of Boone, Matthew (Shellie) Grabau of Boone and Brandon (Amber) Grabau of Boone; one sister, Charlene Teed of Ankeny, Iowa; and sister-in-law and brother-in-law, Lisa and Charles Glover of Kansasville, Wisconsin. He is further survived by his grandchildren; Tracy (Christina) Mitchels of Ogden, Iowa, Tonya (Johnnie) Mitchels of Ames, Iowa, Justin, Nick, Max, and Adam Watts all of Boone, Heather Ott of Jefferson, Iowa, Nick Blasnitz of Harcourt, Iowa, Willie Blasnitz of Alden, Iowa, Mike Hanks of Rippey, Iowa, Josie Sharp of Boone, Angie (Eric) Meyers of Ridgeland, Mississippi, Bryan Myers of Ames, Iowa, Michael Myers Jr. (Kristen) of Boone, Daniel (Jennifer) Myers of Des Moines, Iowa, Ashli (Patrick) Seward of Comanche, Oklahoma, Travjion Freeman of Boone, Jazelynn and Janessa Grabau both of Boone, Mekenzie Grabau of Fort Dodge, Iowa, Landon and Emma Grabau both of Boone, Damon and Dusty Moran both of Boone, Dylan Bangs of Boone; 5 great-grandchildren; and many beloved nephews and nieces.

Frank’s wishes were to be cremated.

A memorial services will be held on Friday morning, September 25th at 10:00 a.m. at Stark-Welin Chapel in Boone.
Interment will be in Linwood Park Cemetery.

Visitations will be at the Stark-Welin Chapel in Boone on Thursday evening, September 24, 2015 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. with the family present during that time to greet friends.

In memory of Francis, memorials may be directed to the family to be distributed at a later date.


Marlys Moore

September 22, 1940 – October 27, 2015

Marlys Kay Kosanke Moore, age 75, of Ames Iowa went to be with her Lord and Savior Tuesday October 27, at Israel Family Hospice House in Ames. A gathering of friends and family will be 4:00-7:00 p.m. Friday, October 30, at Grandon Funeral and Cremation Care, 414 Lincoln Way in Ames, with a 2:00 p.m. Saturday, October 31 Funeral Service at Grandon Funeral and Cremation Care. Burial will follow at the Ames Municipal Cemetery.

Marlys was born September 22, 1940 in Des Moines, Iowa the daughter of Vern and Bernice Kosanke. She married Edward Moore in Hubbard, Iowa on June 15, 1968 and he preceded her in death in 2003. She was a homemaker and mother involved with 4-H and Girl Scouts. Marlys was a member of the Heartland Baptist Church. In her free time, she enjoyed gardening and writing to pen pals all over the world.

She is survived by her daughters; Lee Ann Montz of Ankeny, Connie Nordstrom of Hawaii, and Lisa Ryan of Ames, grandchildren; Amy Montz, Aaron Montz, Drew Nordstrom, Blake Nordstrom, Caleb Nordstrom, Shelby Ryan, Kaylee Ryan, Dyllan Ryan, Alyssa Willis, Dallas Moore, great grandchildren; Braydon Lutman, Payton Joynes, Karsynn Montz, Jayden Montz, and two brothers, Marlyn Kosanke, and Leland Kosanke.

She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Ed Moore, and son Randy Moore.


Norma Lucille Morgan

November 26, 1925 – August 28, 2015

Norma Lucille (Shellito) Morgan, born November 26, 1925, in Ames, Iowa, died peacefully from heart failure on Friday, August 28, 2015, at the age of 89. Norma was a woman of deep faith, who was gracious and kind. She possessed quiet strength and a positive outlook throughout her life. Her hobbies included reading, gardening, and playing bridge, and she loved dogs. She had a profound love for her family and was deeply admired and respected by her children and other family members.

Norma was the only child of Harley and Mabel (Cotton) Shellito. After spending her childhood in Ames, she moved to Spencer, Iowa, with her parents the summer before her senior year of high school, where her father opened a MaidRite shop.

Norma attended Iowa State College, earning a bachelor of science degree in home economics and technical journalism in 1946. While a student, she was a member and president of the ISC Alpha Delta Pi house and served as an editor of the Iowa State Daily newspaper.

On March 23, 1946, Norma married Harold Morgan, a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. They became the parents of three sons and a daughter, and lived in Winner, SD, Ruthven, IA, Champaign, IL, Waukon, IA, West Union, IA, Austin, MN, Auburn, IA, Algona, IA, and Auburn, AL, before putting down roots in Denison, IA. In 2011, Norma returned to Ames to live in the Northcrest Retirement Community to be near family.

Her career was with the Iowa State University Extension Service. She began with Extension as a County Home Economist in Kossuth County in 1962, then worked as the County Home Economist for Crawford County and eventually Ida County from 1965 until her retirement in 1988. She served as president of the Iowa Epsilon Sigma Phi Extension organization, as well as president of the Iowa Association of Extension Home Economics Association. In 1977, she was honored with the R.K. Bliss Award for outstanding achievement by Extension Staff for developing an educational program, and the N.A.E.H.E. Distinguished Service Award.

Earlier in life, Norma worked as the head cook and manager of the Ruthven school hot lunch program in the late 1940s. She taught Head Start in Alabama in 1965, the first summer of the program’s existence.

In Denison, Norma served on the Denison School Board from 1970-76. She was an active member of the First United Methodist Church, serving on numerous committees and a church circle. She also belonged to the American Association of University Women, P.E.O., and the Tuesday Women’s Club. In her retirement, she enjoyed wintering in Florida and it was a highlight for her to travel with the Ames Hi Class of 1942 on two trips to Europe.

Upon moving to Ames in 2011, Norma re-joined the church of her youth, the Collegiate Presbyterian Church.

Norma was preceded in death by her parents, Harley and Mabel Shellito, and her husband, Harold Morgan.

She is survived by her four children: Robert (Michele) Morgan of Omaha, Nebraska, John (Jan) Morgan of Rochester, Minnesota, Thomas (Rita) Morgan, of Manassas, Virginia, and Catherine (David) Carlyle of Ames, Iowa. She is also survived by eight grandchildren: Ben (Rebecca) Morgan, Sam Morgan, Barton Morgan (Jennifer Miller), Tim Morgan, Andy (Melissa) Morgan, Joe (Ashley) Morgan, Laura (Brian) Bowshier, and Jamie (J. Michael) Williams. In addition, she is survived by seven great-grandchildren.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made in her honor to UNICEF or to Good Neighbor Emergency Assistance of Ames.


Ruth Elizabeth Pierce (Hughes) Moyer

September 2, 1919 – February 22, 2016

Ruth Elizabeth Pierce (Hughes) Moyer passed peacefully on Monday afternoon, February 22, 2016, at the Baptist Health Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Scotia, NY. She was born on September 2, 1919, to Gilbert D. and Elizabeth Bennett Pierce of Bridgewater, NY.

She is survived by a daughter, Betty Ann Hughes (Warren Sheldon) of Scotia, NY; granddaughter, Amelia Davies Robinson (Bryan K.) of Alliance, OH, and their children; grandson, Bryan John Davies of Remsen, NY, and his sons; and several dozen “academic daughters”. In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her sister, Grace (Pierce) Risley; younger daughter, Carol E. Hughes; husband, James W. Moyer; and former husband, Walter E. Hughes.

Dr. Moyer earned her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from Cornell University. She served in the U.S. Navy in Gainesville, GA, from 1944-46. She taught high school home economics in upstate NYS until 1965, and then served as a teaching assistant at Cornell while completing her Ph.D. She joined the faculty of West Virginia University in 1968, and moved to Iowa State University in 1971. She retired from ISU in 1986 as the Head of Home Economics Education and Mary B. Welch Distinguished Professor of Home Economics.

She was active in and honored by many professional and academic societies and consulted internationally on home economics curriculum development, including advising UNESCO. Following her retirement from ISU, she spent one semester as a visiting professor at the National University of Taiwan.

In her retirement, she volunteered for local social services entities in Ames, IA; golfed, swam, and played bridge regularly; and traveled extensively before relocating to Florida in 2002. From 2010 through January 2016, she resided at the Marjorie Doyle Rockwell Center in Cohoes, NY. The family thanks the dedicated Rockwell staff for their compassionate care for Ruth.
There will be no calling hours. A memorial service with inurnment at Solomon National Cemetery, Schuylerville, NY, will be held later in the spring, at the convenience of the family.

Ruth Elizabeth Pierce (Hughes) Moyer
Tribute by her daughter, Betty Ann Hughes

Dr. Ruth Pierce (Hughes) Moyer was born on Sept. 2, 1919, into a rural New York State dairy farming family - - but not just any farm family.  Her parents, plus several aunts and uncles, were college-educated professionals, and there was an expectation that Ruth and her sister would follow in their footsteps.  Ruth did, dramatically, eventually earning her BS, MS, and PhD from Cornell University.  Using her first two degrees, she taught junior/senior high school home economics; served in the US Navy during WWII; worked as a rural home economics extension agent; and returned to teaching junior/senior high school.

When Ruth realized that she would have to support her daughters and herself, she returned to Cornell to earn a Ph.D.  After completing that degree, she served on the faculty of West Virginia University for 3 years before accepting a position at Iowa State University.  At ISU, she eventually became a widely-acknowledged expert on curriculum development and assessment, including a strong emphasis on women learning personal finance skills.  To a large extent, her research emphases were based on her own and family experiences - - as a child of the Great Depression and as a single parent, she lived the reality and importance of women managing tight family finances; and as a traveling extension agent and rural teacher, she saw the difference that even basic financial education could make in the lives of women and families.  

Ruth eventually received university, national, and even international recognition for her research and professional contributions, but she was also respected and admired as an academic advisor and mentor.  Many of her former students even labeled themselves as her “academic daughters”, and in later in her life, we all recalled many of the same gestures and facial expressions - - often supportive smiles, but also the occasional stern glance over the glasses.  She passed that support and encouragement on to her grandchildren, too; my stepdaughter often comments that getting to know Ruth, and the rest of the women in her family, is what showed her that there was an intentional pattern - - education really does make a difference.

Beyond her professional achievements, Ruth was also a gifted athlete and musician.  She continued to play golf and swim well into her 80’s and to swim into her early 90’s.  She also gleefully played piano for family and friends until she was past 90, and she continued to enjoy attending musical performances until a few months before her death.  As with her love and respect for education, she passed these loves on to her family.

Ruth passed peacefully on February 22, 2016.  Her ashes are now at the Solomon National Cemetery in Schuylerville, NY, just a few miles from her mother’s family farm.

Ruth Elizabeth Pierce (Hughes) Moyer
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Dr. Hughes (Moyer) began her tenure at Iowa State University (ISU) in 1971 and retired in 1986 as the Head of Home Economics Education (now Family and Consumer Sciences Education in the Human Development and Family Studies Department) and Mary B. Welch Distinguished Professor of Home Economics. Prior to coming to ISU, she was on the faculty of West Virginia University. Earlier in her life, she served in the U.S. Navy in Gainesville, GA from 1944-46 and taught high school home economics education in upstate New York until 1965. She served as a teaching assistant at Cornell University while completing her Ph.D. She earned her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from Cornell University.

As the head of the Department of Home Economics Education, Dr. Hughes worked with the home economics consultants in the Iowa Department of Public Instruction to establish evaluation tools used to determine the effectiveness of Iowa’s consumer and homemaking education programs. This work continued at the national level. She was active in and honored by many professional and academic societies and consulted internationally on home economics curriculum development, including advising UNESCO.

As one of her graduate students, I remember her tenacity, leadership and support of my learning experiences that were significant in my professional growth as a family and consumer sciences professional.

In her retirement, she married James Moyer, volunteered for social service entities in Ames, Iowa; golfed, swam, played bridge regularly; and traveled extensively before relocating to Florida in 2002. From 2010 through January 2016, she resided at the Marjorie Doyle Rockwell Center in Cohoes, NY.

She passed peacefully on Monday afternoon, February 22, 2016, at the Baptist Health Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Scotia, NY. She was born on September 2, 1919, to Gilbert D. and Elizabeth Bennett Pierce of Bridgewater, NY.

She is survived by a daughter, Betty Ann Hughes (Warren Sheldon) of Scotia, NY; granddaughter, Amelia Davies Robinson (Bryan K.) of Alliance, OH, and their children; grandson, Bryan John Davies of Remsen, NY, and his sons; and several dozen “academic daughters, friends and professional colleagues.” In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her sister, Grace (Pierce) Risley; younger daughter, Carol E. Hughes; husband, James W. Moyer; and former husband, Walter E. Hughes.

Obituary from Glenville Funeral Home, Glenville, NY with modifications
Submitted by Barbara Woods, Ph.D., CFCS (former graduate student) and Margaret Torrie, Ed.D., CFCS Retired


Helen Mullenbach

October 9, 1929 – March 12, 2015

Helen Mullenbach age 85, of Ames, passed away Tuesday, May 12, at Mary Greeley Medical Center in Ames. Visitation will be 5 -8:00 p.m. Friday, May 15, at Grandon Funeral and Cremation Care 414 Lincoln Way Ames, with a 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 16 funeral service at St. Cecilia Catholic Church, 30th and Hoover in Ames, burial will follow at St. Peter and Paul Cemetery in Gilbert.

Helen was born October 9, 1929 in Gilbert, the daughter of Anton and Esther Uthe. She graduated from Gilbert High School attended college but returned home to assist with her mother's health care and younger brother Clarence. She married Germaine P. Mullenbach April 22, 1957 at St. Peter and Paul Catholic Church in Gilbert. She stayed at home with her children until 1969 when she went to work as an Administrative Assistant ending her career at Iowa State Book Store. She was a member of St. Cecilia Catholic Church where she was involved in St. Mary Circle, the Moose Auxiliary, and cherished her time with her family and their events.

Helen is survived by her children, Bob and (Pat) Mullenbach of Grimes, Marjorie and (Scott) Anfinson of Rochester, MN; Jon and (Suzanne) Mullenbach of Gilbert, 5 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren, sisters, Mary Smith of Boone, Sister Mary Anton of Springfield, IL; and a brother, Clarence Uthe of Elma.

Memorials may be directed to: St. Peter and Paul building fund or St. Cecelia Catholic Church.


Edward “Gene” Eugene Neven

August 30, 1931 – September 6, 2015

 “Gene”- Edward Eugene Neven, 84, of Marshalltown, passed away on Sunday, September 6, 2015, surrounded by his family at Seasons Hospice Home in Rochester, Minnesota, following complications of heart surgery at St. Mary’s Hospital.
Funeral services for Gene will be held on Friday, September 11, 2015 at 10:30 a.m. at Hope United Methodist Church in Marshalltown. Visitation will be Thursday, September, 10, 2015 from 4:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the Mitchell Family Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to Marshall County 4-H Foundation, Hope United Methodist Church, Riverside Cemetery Improvement Fund or the donor’s charity of choice. For more information, please visit www.mitchellfh.com or call 641-844-1234. Mitchell Family Funeral Home is caring for Gene and his family.

Gene was born on August 30, 1931, in Des Moines, IA, to John Edward and Mary Murrow Neven. Growing up on a farm in Camp Township, in Polk County, with his early education at Camp #2 one room country school. He was a member of the 4-H Club when Don Harmon was the 4-H and youth leader. His high school graduating in 1950 was from Runnells High School, which is now Southeast Polk School System. He attended and graduated in 1954 with a Bachelor of Science degree from Iowa State University in Agronomy and Journalism. He was a member of the Adelante Fraternity.

In the summer of 1954, Gene was 4-H and the youth leader in VanBuren County before entering the Air Force in San Angelo, Texas. Following his service, he was employed as 4-H and youth leader in Jones County, Iowa, from 1957 until 1960 and Extension Assistant Director in Woodbury County 1961- 1967. He followed Don Harmon as Marshall County Extension Director beginning in April of 1967 until his retirement in April of 1992.

Working with agricultural groups in the county as well as 4-H Clubs and the Central Iowa Fair involving all ages. His interests in horticulture were shared not only in and out of the office along with the “DOWN TO EARTH” Column in the Marshalltown Times-Republican newspaper for 25 years. He was involved with the Marshalltown Chamber of Commerce Agriculture Committee, Trees Forever Program, Iowa Arboretum Board, Noon Kiwanis Club where he was President from 1972-73, Riverside Cemetery Board, Creative Retirement Committee, Marshall County Continuing History Book Committee (1997), Marshalltown Meals on Wheels Board and Agriculture chair of the United Way Board, 20th Century Club and Marshall County 4-H Foundation just to name a few. He was a charter member of Hope United Methodist Church in 1971. Acknowledgements of his agricultural educational efforts were recognized with the Distinguished Service Award by the National County Agents in 1976, the PRIDE Award from the Marshalltown Chamber of Commerce, and the Horticulture Award from the Iowa Arboretum. His interests of vegetable and flower gardening, woodworking and volunteering were passions of his.

The marriage of Gene to Joann McBride Neven took place November 13, 1965, at the 1st United Methodist Church, in LeMars, Iowa. Two children were born to the couple, Adele Kay and Darin Eugene Neven.

Gene is survived by his wife; Joann, daughter- Adele (Richard Michael) Pattinson, granddaughter- Ella Joann Pattinson of Rochester, Minnesota; son- Dr. Darin (Stacee Anderson) Neven, MD, of Spokane, Washington. Also surviving are his sister Laura Mae Neven Perrett of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin and in-laws, nieces, nephews and cousins along with his beloved Schnauzer, Brandy.

Predeceasing him were his parents and Joann’s parents, Joseph W. and Agnes McBride of Oelwein, Iowa.


Wanda A. Niemann

September 24, 1924 – November 14, 2015

Wanda Arlene Niemann, 91. of Lake Mary, Florida died November 14, 2015. A private family service will be held on November 19, 2015 at the DeGusipe Funeral Home in Maitland, Florida. A Celebration of Life gathering for friends and family will be held in Wayne, Nebraska over the 2016 Memorial Day weekend.

Wanda Niemann was born September 24, 1924 in Laurel, Nebraska, the only child of Gilbert and Alyce (Loberg) Linn. She grew up on several different farms in northeast Nebraska. Wanda received her early education in country schools and graduated from Wakefield High School in 1941. Wanda continued her education at Wayne State College and taught in one-room Nebraska country schools before she married Frederick Niemann on March 23, 1944.

Wanda and Frederick lived in Laurel, Nebraska until 1961 when Frederick was transferred to Ames, Iowa. Wanda was employed at the Iowa State University Department of Animal Science from 1965 to 1998 when Wanda and Frederick retired to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. Frederick passed away in 2005. After Frederick's death Wanda continued to reside in Ponte Vedra Beach until she moved to Oakmonte Village in Lake Mary, Florida in 2011. Wanda resided at Oakmonte Village until her death.

Wanda will be remembered as a loving and devoted wife, mother, and grandmother as well as an avid supporter of Iowa State University.

Survivors include her daughter, Gay Renee Bovee (and son-in-law, Mike Bovee) of Winter Park, FL, granddaughters, Brielle Bovee of New Orleans, LA, and Courtney Bovee of Boston, MA, her brother and sister-in-law, Edward and Audrey Niemann of Papillion, NE and numerous nephews, cousins and a niece.

Wanda was preceded in death by her husband, Frederick Niemann, her parents, Gilbert and Alyce Linn, her father and mother-in-law Edward and Alma Niemann, her brother and sister-in-law, Herb and Joyce Niemann, and her nephew, Michael Niemann.

Memorials may be directed in her honor to the Iowa State University Department of Animal Science Block and Bridle Club (1221 Kildee Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (515) 294-2160).

The family thanks you for your sympathy and kindness.


James William Nilsson

June 8, 1924 – December 26, 2015

James W. Nilsson, 91, passed away December 26, 2015 at Green Hills Health Care Center. He was preceded in death by his parents (Axel Daniel Nilsson and Constance Catherine Smitheram), daughter Rhonda Sue Kreamer (Scott) and sister Ruth Fitz.

Those left to honor his memory are his loving wife of 67 years, Anna Louise Vogt Nilsson; his sons Robert (Donise), Paul and Bruce; daughter Beverly Lemme (Jim); son-in-law Scott Kreamer; grandchildren Doug Lemme, Sara Lemme, Katie Kreamer, Stephanie Kreamer and Matthew Nilsson-Johnson; sister Margaret Weaver; many nieces, nephews and friends.

Jim grew up in Carleton and Monroe Michigan. He entered the army after high school and served in World War II. After the war he went to school in Iowa City, where he met Anna Louise Vogt. They married in 1948 and moved to Ames, where Jim attended ISU, earning a master's degree and Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He taught electrical engineering at ISU for 39 years. He became an IEEE Fellow in 1990. In 1992 he earned the IEEE undergraduate teaching award for inspirational teaching. He authored Electrical Circuits in 1983. In 1992 he was given an award for outstanding contributions to Addison-Wesley for the 4th edition of Electrical Circuits.

Jim loved teaching and traveling out west. All five of his children graduated from ISU.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Warren B. Boast Undergraduate Teaching Award at ISU's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at http://www.foundation.iastate.edu/give you will need to specify "I want to choose where my gift is designated” and in the notes section write "Warren B. Boast Memorial Fund 0516552". The other way is to write a check to "Warren B. Boast Memorial Fund 0516552" and send it to the Iowa State Alumni Association at 2505 University Blvd, Ames, IA 50010.

James William Nilsson
Tribute by his wife, Anna Nilsson

He will live forever locked safely within my heart—Anna Nilsson

James W. Nilsson

Born:
June 8, 1924
Michigan, United States

Died:
Dec. 26, 1015
Ames, Iowa, United States

Age:
91 years, 6 months, 18 days

Religion:
Christian

Jim Nilsson was professor of Electrical Engineering at Iowa State University for 39 years. He authored the textbook: Electric Circuits. His family of three boys and two daughters were his pride and joy. They graduated from Iowa State University. So many memories of Jim’s love for family and University surround us of one who cared about us and education. We lovingly remember you.

Wife,
Anna Nilsson


Eugene V. Olson

November 22, 1923 – 2015

Dad wrote the story of his life several years ago. This is his Story.

"Gene Olson was born November 22, 1923. He was the son of Mabel Bjelland Olson and James Olson. He was born and raised on a farm near Humboldt, Iowa. He attended a rural one room school and graduated from Humboldt High School in 1941. He lived on the farm with his parents and two brothers: Don and Howard. He enlisted in the Marine Corp. in 1943. He served in the Pacific Theater and saw action in the Leyte Island of the Philippines. He was discharged in 1946.

He met his wife, Vivian Strand, at the Lutheran Church in Humboldt. She was teaching at the local school and directed the choir at the church. He was persuaded to join the choir because his good friend, Russ Johnson, said the director was a 'cute lady'. He didn't know how to read music but got by standing next to Russ.

Vivian and Gene were married on December 27, 1947. They lived in Fort Dodge, Iowa and moved to Urbandale, Iowa in 1956. They moved to Ames in 1962 where he worked for ISU in refrigeration and air conditioning. He retired in 1986. Gene was a member of the Refrigeration Service Engineer's Society from 1960 until the time of his death. He was awarded "The Man of the Year" for the Iowa RSES in 1975."

His wife Vivian preceded him in death. He is also preceded in death by his parents, two brothers Don and Howard Olson, and two still-born children. He is survived by his daughters, Ruth Fox and her husband Bob, and Nancy Settles and her husband David. Gene has three grandsons, Carl Gauley and his wife Karen Lu, Vincent and D.J. Settles, and a granddaughter, Elizabeth Settles. He has two great-grand children, Kai and Anno Lu Gauley

Memorial Service will be at 2:00, Saturday August 22nd, at the Collegiate United Methodist Church in Ames.


Rollen Phillips

June 4, 1919 – December 30, 2015

Rollen Phillips, 96 years of age, died December 31, 2015, at Waterford in Ames. A gathering of friends and family will be held from 4:00-6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 6, 2016, at Grandon Funeral and Cremation Care, 414 Lincoln Way in Ames. A Masonic service follows at 6:00 p.m.

A celebration of life funeral service will be at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, January 7, 2016 at First United Methodist Church, 516 Kellogg Ave, in Ames, with a private family graveside service following at the Ames Municipal Cemetery.

Rollen was born June 10, 1919, in Marathon, Iowa, to Wendell and Grace (Arnett) Phillips. He attended Shipley Consolidated High School and graduated in 1937. Rollen met Betty Russell, and the couple married on April 22, 1943 in Houston, Texas. He enlisted into the Air Corp flight school and received his wings as a Second Lieutenant. In 1944, he flew 50 missions over Europe as a B-24 pilot in World War II.

After returning from the war, he entered Iowa State University and started his family in Nevada. The couple moved to Ames in 1952. He chose the profession of an offset printer at Iowa State University where he worked for 35 years, retiring in 1984. After retirement, he and Betty enjoyed 55 bus trips throughout the United States, visiting every state except Alaska and Hawaii. Throughout their years together, Betty and Rollen also loved to vacation in Minnesota, where he spent time fishing with his family. Rollen was a member of the Arcadia Lodge AF & AM #249 of Ames for 50 years, VFW 2209 of Nevada, and First United Methodist Church in Ames.

Family was paramount to Rollen. He often said that he wasn't a millionaire, but he had a million dollars’ worth of family. He was especially fond of his grandchildren, sharing with them his most important values: God, Country, and Family.

Rollen is survived by his wife, Betty, children; Linda Lucente, Rhonda (Terry) Nederhoff, and Richard (Carol) Phillips, grandchildren; Michael Dennis, Merrily Guyer, David Moppin, William Dunkin III, Randall Dunkin, Diana Burkhalter, Kimberly Phillips, and Meredith Phillips.

He was preceded in death by a daughter, Sharon Kay Dennis, in February of 2007.

Memorials may be directed to the First United Methodist Church in Ames or the American Cancer Society

Rollen Phillips
Tribute by his daughter, Rhonda Nederhoff

Rollen L. Phillips as born June 10, 1919. Rollen passed away at Waterford in Ames, on Dec. 31, 2015.

Rollen was in the air force in WWII. He flew the B24, and completed 55 missions in Italy. After the war he attend ISU and later worked for the ISU press for 35 years. The press building was located across from the varied industry building at that time. It moved south of the campus in 1985. Rollen printed the “Bomb”, the ISU yearbook. It was published annually from 1894 through 1994. Many of the professors’ guide books were also printed here.

Rollen was married to Betty Russell and they were married for 72 ½ years. They raised four children, three daughters and one son. He was an honorable man who loved God, his country and was dedicated to his family. He often said he wasn’t rich, but his family was worth millions!


Richard H. Pletcher

May 21, 1935 – September 12, 2015

Richard Pletcher, 80, of Ames, died September 12, 2015. A Celebration of Life Memorial Service will be at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, September 19 at Collegiate Presbyterian Church in Ames.

Richard H. Pletcher was born in Elkhart, Indiana on May 21, 1935, the son of Raymond Harold Pletcher and Annabelle Mary Pletcher. Richard graduated from Purdue University with a Mechanical Engineering degree in 1957. He married Carol Robbins on June 9, 1957 in Elkhart and the couple promptly departed for active duty in the U.S. Navy in California. Richard proudly served as Ensign and Ltjg for 3 years with amphibious forces in the Pacific.

After military service, Richard attended graduate school at Cornell University where he received the Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees. He worked as a senior research engineer at United Aircraft Research Laboratories in Hartford, CT from 1965-1967, and then joined the faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Iowa State University. He was active in several technical societies including the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He was a Fellow in ASME and an Associate Fellow in AIAA. He received awards from Iowa State University for both teaching and research. Richard received the ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award in Science in 2009. He was an associate editor of the Journal of Heat Transfer and served on the editorial advisory board of Numerical Heat Transfer. Richard conducted basic and applied topics in fluid dynamics and heat transfer. He served as principal investigator for numerous research grants from sponsors such as NSF, NASA, the Army Research Office, Allison Gas Turbines, John Deere, Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research and served as a consultant to industry and government. He gave many invited lectures throughout the world. He authored or co-authored over 80 journal articles and several books, the most notable of which was Computational Fluid Mechanic and Heat Transfer, a textbook that survived three editions over a 30 year period. It was one of the first texts available in that emerging field made possible by the digital computer. He served as major or co-major professor for 33 doctoral students and 17 master's students. Richard was an active member of Collegiate Presbyterian Church, Town and Country Kiwanis, and an avid fan of ISU women's basketball.

Richard loved his family, Brittany dogs, hunting, fishing and computational fluid dynamics.

He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Carol; his son, Douglas (Judy) Pletcher of Edina, MN; his daughters, Laura (Byron) Olson of Edina, and Cynthia (Todd) Cisneros of Ankeny; his grandchildren, Cortelle and Samantha Pletcher, Bennett and Blake Olson, and Mason and Madeline Cisneros; his sister, Judy Floyd of Gardner, KS; his sister-in-law, Doris Kistler of Baton Rouge, LA; and many nieces and nephews.

Richard was preceded in death by his parents.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to Collegiate Presbyterian Church, Israel Family Hospice House, or Iowa Brittany Rescue.

Richard H. Pletcher
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Professor Emeritus Richard Pletcher passed away September 12, 2015 at the age of 80.

Dr. Richard (Dick) Pletcher was born in 1935 in Elkhart, Indiana. He graduated from Purdue University with a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering in 1957. He married Carol Robbins on June 9, 1957 in Elkhart, and from there the couple left for Dick’s active duty in the U.S. Navy in California. Dick served as Ensign and Ltjg for 3 years with amphibious forces in the Pacific. He was an engineering officer of a landing craft and an assistant gunnery officer on a landing ship dock from 1957 to 1960. He spent 2 years with United Aircraft Research Laboratories in Hartford, Connecticut from 1965 to 1967.

Dick returned to academia and attended Cornell University for graduate school, receiving M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering. He joined the faculty of Department of Mechanical Engineering at Iowa State University in 1967 until his retirement in 2007, after 40 years.

During his time at Iowa State, he also served as Director of the Computational Fluid Dynamics Center. He was a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His life’s work contributed greatly to the ISU Department of Mechanical Engineering’s strong reputation in education and research. Dick received the ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award in Science in 2009. He was an associate editor of the Journal of Heat Transfer and served on the editorial advisory board of Numerical Heat Transfer.

Dick conducted basic and applied topics in fluid dynamics and heat transfer. He served as principal investigator for numerous research grants from sponsors such as NSF, NASA, the Army Research Office, Allison Gas Turbines, John Deere, Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research and served as a consultant to industry and government. He gave many invited lectures throughout the world. He authored or co-authored over 80 journal articles and several books, the most notable of which was Computational Fluid Mechanic and Heat Transfer, a textbook that survived three editions over a 30-year period. It was one of the first texts available in that emerging field made possible by the digital computer. He served as major or co-major professor for 33 doctoral students and 17 master's students.

Dick was an active member of Collegiate Presbyterian Church, Town and Country Kiwanis, and an avid fan of ISU women's basketball. Dick loved his family, Brittany dogs, hunting, fishing and computational fluid dynamics. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Carol, three children, and six grandchildren.


Irene S. Pope

September 2, 1926 – March 30, 2015

Irene Pope was born at her home on the family farm near Somerset, Wisconsin, on Sept. 2, 1926. She married Dr. Edward Pope on Sept. 7, 1957, in Madison, Wisconsin. Irene received Bachelors and Masters degrees from the University of Wisconsin. She taught business education in Escanaba, Michigan; East High School and the U. of Wisconsin in Madison; Guam; and DMACC, Ankeny and Ames. Most recently she enjoyed teaching flower arranging in the Ames Adult Education program.

Irene was an active member of the Ames Garden Club, Bethesda Lutheran Church and Reiman Gardens. She served on the boards of the Ames Adult Education Advisory Committee, Reiman Gardens Co-Horts, Friendships International, and National Assoc. of Retired Federal Employees. She also volunteered at Worldly Goods for many years.

She especially enjoyed sharing her gardens, her pressed flower creations, and her home with international students, friends and family. Irene was an avid bridge player, world traveler, shell collector, and Sanibel Island enthusiast.

Irene died Monday, March 30, at Mary Greeley Medical Center in Ames.

Irene is survived by two sons, David, Edina, Minnesota and Scott (Mary Jean), Estes Park, Colorado; her sister, Gloria Lutz; and brother, Aaron Schiefelbein. She was preceded in death by her husband, Edward; sister, Ruth Schremser; and brothers, Oswald, Kenneth and Norman Schiefelbein.

After her husband died, she raised her two sons with the help of her extended family, friends and neighbors. She was a great mother and a gifted artist who was full of life, interests and a love for the earth and all those that were a part of her world. Her friends were a gift from God.

Memorials may be made to Bethesda Lutheran Church, Ames; ISU Foundation-Reiman Gardens; or Northcrest Community.


Mary Patricia “Pat” Portwood

December 4, 1923 – October 16, 2015

Mary Patricia “Pat” Portwood, age 91, of Harlan, and formerly of Boone and Clear Lake, died on October 16, 2015, at the Avoca Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Avoca. A Funeral Mass will be Wednesday, October 21, 2015, at 11 a.m. at the Church of the Sacred Heart in Boone with Rev. James Bruch officiating. Burial will be in Sacred Heart Cemetery in Boone.

Mary Patricia Portwood was born in Garner, Iowa, on December 4, 1923, the second of nine children born to George and Maude (Engstler) Schneider. Pat grew up in the Garner area and graduated from Clear Lake High School in 1941. On March 4, 1943, she married Leslie Portwood in Mason City. Pat and Les became the parents of six children: Janann, Michael, Phillip, Eileen, James, and Joseph. The couple moved from Clear Lake to Boone in 1964. Over the years, Pat worked for FS Farm Service, Boone State Bank, ASCS Office, and Iowa State University, retiring from Iowa State in 1986. The couple relocated to Harlan in 2002.

Pat was an active member of the Sacred Heart Church in Boone where she was always willing to help out when needed. In earlier years, she enjoyed gardening, quilting, crafting, sewing, and writing.

Pat was preceded in death by her parents; sisters Millicent, Annamarie, Elexine, and Theo; brothers Armond, John “Jack”, and Elrede; grandson Joseph Michael; daughter-in-law Brenda; brother-in-law Phillip Portwood; sisters-in-law Marjorie (Robert Hansen), Helen (Robert) Compton, and Dixie (Bernie) Dankbar. She is survived by her husband Leslie; her children: Janann (Steve) Beaubien, Michael Portwood, Phillip Portwood, Eileen (Tim) Johnson, Jim (Kate) Portwood, and Joe (Joann) Portwood. Also surviving are her sister Genevieve (Joseph) Vallenari; a sister-in-law Patsy Portwood; and grandchildren: Todd Beaubien, Jenee Beaubien-Boetel, Tony Portwood, Andy Portwood, Travis Portwood, Nathaniel Portwood, Amanda Portwood-Thielan, Clayton Portwood, Reahna Portwood, Melissa Portwood-Lehmann, Cory Hunt, and Bailey Portwood; and 18 great grandchildren.

Friends may call at the Schroeder Memorial Chapel at Sixth and Marshall on Tuesday from 2 to 8 p.m. where a Rosary will be recited at 3 p.m. and a Vigil Service will be at 7 p.m. The family will be present from 6 to 8 p.m. Visitation continues on Wednesday at the funeral chapel from 8 a.m. until 10:00 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorials in memory of Pat may be made to Catholic Charities of Sioux City.


Graeme Ross Quick

March 10, 1936 – May 25, 2015

IN farm machinery circles just about everybody knew of, or personally knew, Graeme Quick, the energetic engineer whose leading Australian and overseas roles made him a respected authority on harvesters, tractors and much more.

His experience and innovative reputation were complemented by a prolific habit of writing books about machinery and about 150 other technical manuals.

Dr Graeme Ross Quick, author of 14 benchmark publications, including the still-popular sellers Australian Tractors (first published in 1990) andThe Grain Harvesters (1978), died last month aged 79.

Described by his contemporaries as one of the world's most amicable experts on grain harvesting technology, his early career highlights included being involved in initial development stages of the axial-flow combine harvester, the heart of Case IH headers since 1977.

His expertise extended to other farm machinery, including and tractor loaders and research and advisory work in about 30 countries.

Raised in Victoria and one of three children of Ross (a Geelong College teacher) and Florence, young Graeme's fascination with farm equipment started on an uncle's nearby farm where he helped stook sheaves and worked with a horse-drawn reaper and binder.

After leaving school farm work helped fund his studies for a University of Melbourne degree in mechanical engineering, also sparking a career-long interest in field equipment efficiency.

His in-field calculations on the Sunshine AL harvester and Nuffield tractor he was working with concluded they only actually stripped something about 30 per cent of their time in the paddock, largely because of harvest breakdowns.

Graduating to initially work as an agricultural engineering lecturer, he moved his wife Marlene and their three young boys to the US in 1967, accepting an invitation to teach and study for a doctorate at Iowa State University, later getting a research job in Norway.

His harvesting expertise was then sought in Canada by the White Farm Equipment company, where he helped design and launch White's Harvest Boss 9700 rotary-type header which boasted the industry's highest capacity performance at the time.
While in Ontario he also patented inventions such as bolt-on and Kwik-cut knife front section concepts still used on harvesters today.

Returning home in 1976 he joined CSIRO instigating the design of Australia's first rotary-type harvester, although the project's commercial success was stymied by grain industry recession in the 1980s and the growth of imported self-propelled header sales.

Between 1981 and 1988 he led NSW's Department of Agriculture engineering division based at Glenfield in Sydney, then moved to the Philippines to run International Rice Research Institute's agricultural engineering division in until 1995, switching to United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) work on a British-funded small-scale stripper-harvester.

His rice research and FAO projects with small machinery took him as far afield as Egypt, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Bhutan in the Himalayas.

He eventually retired from international job hopping after a seven-year stint back at Iowa State where he was power and machinery engineering section team leader and adjunct professor in agricultural and biosystems engineering, focused on grain and biomass harvesting and crop cutting research.

During his busy career Graeme Quick built many pieces of field machinery, was awarded 15 design patents and became the first Australian fellow of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

He received US agricultural engineering's highest recognition - the CH McCormick-JI Case gold medal for meritorious contributions to the profession.

He enjoyed lifelong relationships with all sectors of the farm machinery business, from multi-national corporations to small short-line manufacturers, farmers, engineers and researchers.

In semi-retirement the Quicks settled on a small farm at Peachester on Queensland's Sunshine Coast hinterland where Graeme completed several books and consulted to companies and organisations such as the Grains Research and Development Corporation on projects ranging from harvester fires to herbicide-resistant weed management.

In 2009 he told Fairfax agricultural machinery writer Graham Fuller how technical writing had always been "a fascinating part of his career", helped by Marlene who had tolerated books and papers in the wrong places at home and who served as a excellent editor throughout their marriage.

"I've always wanted to get as much as I could down on paper - as a service to humanity," he said.

Graeme Quick is survived by Marlene and sons Peter, Timothy and Steve, two grandsons, a great granddaughter, his brother Don (also an ag engineer) and sister Maxine.

Graeme Ross Quick
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

In mid-May 2015, Australia lost one of its most prominent and innovative agricultural engineers, with the passing of Dr Graeme Quick at his home in the Sunshine Coast Hinterland, Queensland.

Graeme was one of the world’s leading experts on grain harvesting technology, having been a partner in the initial development of the Axial Flow combine harvester. His expertise extended to other farm machinery, including the Kwik-Cut front for harvesting soybeans.

After graduating in engineering from the University of Melbourne, and taking a Ph.D. from Iowa State University in the 1960’s, Graeme spent the first few years working in the N. American farm equipment industry. He then took up a position as Principal Research Scientist in CSIRO Division of Mechanical Engineering from 1976-1981. Between 1981 and 1988 he was Director of Engineering for the NSW Department of Agriculture. He was Head of the Agricultural Engineering Division of the International Rice Research Institute in Los Banos, Philippines, between 1988 and 1995.

In 1995-96 he worked on projects for FAO involving small farm machinery improvement in the developing world. In 1997 he took up the position of team leader in the Power & Machinery Engineering Section and Adjunct Professor, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering Department, Iowa State University until his retirement in 2004. His research interests with Iowa State were on the engineering aspects of farm machinery design, particularly on harvesting of grains and biomass, and in crop cutting and other machine/plant phenomena. He has built many pieces of field machinery, including a tractorloader and several harvesters.

During his professional career Graeme was awarded 15 design patents, has produced fourteen farm machinery books and over 150 peer-reviewed documents and research articles, He is the first Australian to have been made a Fellow, American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) He was also a Fellow and Chartered Professional Engineer, Institution of Engineers, Australia. In 2004 he was awarded US Agricultural Engineering’s highest recognition– the CH McCormick - JI Case gold medal, for his meritorious contributions to the profession.

Throughout his professional career Graeme cultivated an exceptionally amicable relationship with all aspects of the farm machinery business, from the largest multi-national corporations to the smallest short line manufacturer.
He was equally at home with research colleagues or yarning in the paddock with farmers, and formed many lifelong friendships. Since returning home to Queensland he continued book writing – book number 14 was recently published. He also conducted engineering consultancies (including GRDC), ongoing R & D on soybean harvesting technology, combine harvester fires, herbicide-resistant weed management, and most recently on an autonomous tool carrier development.

He will be greatly missed. (This article is compiled by colleagues Jeff Esdaile and Jeff Tullberg and approved by the Quick family).


Elizabeth S. Rectanus

December 11, 1949 – January 8, 2016

Elizabeth S. Rectanus, 66, of Ames, died peacefully January 8, 2016 at Mary Greeley Medical Center. She is survived by her husband Mark W. Rectanus.

Elizabeth was born December 11, 1949 in Springfield, Massachusetts to Harry and Edna (Spalding) Jones. She earned both the B.S. in Biology (1972) and J.D. in Law (1974) at the University of Mississippi. After completing her J.D., Elizabeth worked for the Legislative Audit Committee, Mississippi State Legislature in Jackson, MS during 1974-1975. She received an M.A. in German (1979) from Mississippi State University and continued graduate studies in German from 1979 to 1981 at Washington University in St. Louis where she met her husband Mark. The couple married in Munich, Germany on December 11, 1981 and moved to Ames in 1984.

Elizabeth worked at Iowa State University as an academic advisor and a lecturer in the Department of World Languages and Cultures for over sixteen years until she retired in 2013. She was a dedicated adviser who assisted numerous students in pursuing minors and majors in world languages. Elizabeth enjoyed teaching German and was passionate about supporting the study of world languages.

In addition to travels to Germany, Elizabeth enjoyed traveling within the U.S., as well as reading and cooking.
 
A celebration of Elizabeth's life will be held by the family at a later date to be determined. Memorial donations may be sent to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) at: https://www.aspca.org/secure/memorial

Elizabeth S. Rectanus
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Elizabeth S. Rectanus, who retired in 2013 from WLC after 16 years, passed away at the age of 66 on January 8, 2016 in Ames.  At the time of her retirement, Elizabeth was the sole academic adviser in the Department of World Languages and Cultures, and for many years she also was a lecturer of German.  Elizabeth was born in Springfield, MA, earned a B.S. in Biology and J.D. in Law at the University of Mississippi.  After law school, Elizabeth worked for the Legislative Audit Committee in the Mississippi State Legislature. Later, she received an M.A. in German from Mississippi State University and continued graduate studies at Washington University in St. Louis where she met her husband, Mark. Mark and Elizabeth were married in Munich, Germany and moved to Ames where they became members of the faculty at ISU.

As an adviser, Elizabeth was caring and dedicated.  She was known to put her students first, and work on their behalf to resolve their problems, listen to their concerns, or offer helpful advice. Of special note was her passion for study abroad, and many students studied in countries across the world because of Elizabeth’s influence.  As a teacher, she had a strong classroom presence and a love for the German language and culture. She shared her own experiences in learning German and French with students and that inspired many of them to continue their studies at ISU and abroad. Students often comment on the impact Elizabeth had on their lives.

On a personal level, Elizabeth was thoughtful, fun, and she had a great sense of humor and an absolute love for travel and cooking. Many WLC faculty enjoyed Elizabeth’s great stories about visiting New Orleans or living in Germany, or the many other places she loved to visit.

Although we are profoundly saddened by this loss to the WLC family, we nonetheless celebrate Elizabeth’s life and remember her commitment to WLC and ISU. In that spirit, the Department has sponsored The Elizabeth Rectanus Memorial Scholarship in her honor.  This fund will provide a scholarship to help students studying abroad in Germany. Contributions to the Elizabeth Rectanus Memorial Scholarship, can be made by contacting the ISU Foundation or made directly at the link: http://www.foundation.iastate.edu/rectanus Any amount is of great value to the students who will benefit from this scholarship opportunity.


Robert A. Ruben

No information at this time.


Gertrude “Gert” Ryan

May 11, 1921 – November 28, 2015

Gertrude “Gert” B. Ryan, age 94, of Nevada, died Saturday, November 28, 2015, at Story County Senior Care in Nevada due to complications of a hip fracture.

Funeral services will be held at 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, December 2, 2015, at Memorial Lutheran Church in Nevada, with Pastor David R. Burling officiating.  Private family burial will be held in the Nevada Municipal Cemetery with military honors conducted by William F. Ball Post No. 48 of the American Legion.  In lieu of flowers, memorials in Gert’s name may be directed to the Memorial Lutheran Church Youth Activity Fund.  

Born May 11, 1921, in rural Radcliffe, Iowa, Gertrude Betty (Jacobson) Ryan was the daughter of Olin Martin and Olive Victoria (Swenson) Jacobson.  She graduated from Roland High School.  During World War II, Gert served as a telegrapher for over two years in the United States Navy Waves.

She was married to Chester M. Ryan on June 14, 1947, in Radcliffe, Iowa.  The couple made their home in Nevada where they raised their family of three children.  Gert was employed as secretary of secondary education at Iowa State University for many years, retiring in 1989.  In later years, she became an integral member of the staff at Chet Ryan Mortuary in Nevada.

Gert was a member and past-president of American Legion Auxiliary Unit 48 in Nevada and in 2003, was honored as Grand Marshall of the Memorial Day parade.  She enjoyed golfing and playing bridge.  Gert possessed a strong faith and was a faithful member of Memorial Lutheran Church and participated in Mary Circle. 

Survivors include a son, C. Steven (Laurie) Ryan of Redlands, CA; two daughters, Cynthia (Frank) Ryan-McLain of Nevada, and Cheryl (Al Bradish) Ryan of Nevada; three grandchildren, Jason (Nikki) Ryan, Nicole (Chester Smith) Ryan, and Shawn Ryan; two great-grandchildren, Landon Ryan and Chloe Ryan; a sister, Opal Tjernagel of Madrid; three step-grandchildren, Emily (Sanjay) McLain-Negi, Tina (Joe) Larson, and Frank McLain; and three step-great-grandchildren, Austin Larson, Jenna Larson, and Lenore Negi; as well as other extended family members and many friends.

She was preceded in death by her parents; Chet Ryan on March 3, 1992; three sisters, Lucille Christian, Maxine Hughes, and Violet Morgan; an infant twin brother and sister; and her parents-in-law, C.A. and Caroline Ryan, whom Gert felt were like parents to her.


Donald E. Sanderson

1926 – January 17, 2016

Donald Eugene Sanderson, 89, of Torrey, Utah, passed away on January 17, 2016.

Born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, in 1926 to Arlo and Laura (Goudy) Sanderson, he served two years in the military, June 1944 through the occupation forces in Germany.

He met his future wife, Carol Mary Shaw, at Cornell College, where he received his B.A in 1949. He earned his master’s in mathematical theory from California Institute of Technology in 1951 and his Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1953. Don was a published and awarded math professor of topology at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, until his
retirement in 1991.

Widowed in 1989, he met his second wife, Clotilde Barrett, at Ghost Ranch in New Mexico. Since 1996, they lived in Torrey, Utah, and had traveled and hiked together extensively. Don loved the outdoors, playing cribbage and word games, and producing eye-rolling puns.

He is survived by his younger brother Richard A. Sanderson of Hawaii, second wife Clotilde Barrett of Utah, and three children with Carol (Shaw) Sanderson: Robert C. Sanderson and wife, Nancy, of Colorado; Mark A. Sanderson and wife, Carol, of Iowa; and Karen A. Sanderson of New Mexico. He is also survived by five grandchildren, five great grandchildren, and many relatives and friends.

He is preceded in death by his parents, older brother Robert Sanderson, older sister Shirley (Sanderson) Boyce, and wife Carol (Shaw) Sanderson.

A memorial service in Iowa will be scheduled at a later date.

Donald E. Sanderson
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Professor Donald Sanderson died on January 17, 2016 at the age of 89. He was living in Torrey, Utah at the time.

Professor Sanderson was born in 1926 in Oskaloosa, Iowa; graduated in 1949 from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa; received his master’s degree from the California Institute of Technology in 1951; and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1953. He came to Iowa State as an instructor in 1953 and was promoted to professor in 1964. He retired in 1991.

Professor Sanderson introduced “general topology” to the Iowa State graduate program in mathematics. In the 1950s he taught that course from John L. Kelley’s book General Topology, first published in 1955. Professor Sanderson’s publications were mainly in the area of general topology. He directed several undergraduate theses, some of which were published in the Pi Mu Epsilon Journal. At least two of these theses were awarded prizes as “best paper of the year.”


Mary R. Sawyer

April 14, 1944 – May 20, 2015

Mary R. Sawyer was gathered into the loving embrace of the universe on May 20, 2015. Born April 14, 1944 in McCook, Nebraska, she grew up in the farming community of Beaver City, Nebraska.

Mary was a life-long social justice activist, beginning with her involvement in the civil rights movement as a college student. Her passion for eliminating racism and other forms of oppression was the driving force in her life. After many years of human relations and human rights work, in 1986 she began a 25-year career teaching Religious Studies at Iowa State University in Ames, where she co-founded the African American Studies Program, created a Peace and Justice Internship option, and was a voice for the empowerment of women.

As a scholar-activist, with advanced degrees from Howard University Divinity School (M.A.) and Duke University (Ph.D.), she authored and co-edited three books and numerous articles on African American religion and politics.

Mary was devoted to her family, loved the out-of-doors, and treasured books. A strong supporter of ISU women’s basketball, she also remained a loyal fan of the Nebraska Cornhuskers.

Mary was preceded in death by her parents, Harold and Polly Kentfield Sawyer; a sister, Louise Sawyer; and a brother-in-law, Dennis Richter. She is survived by two sisters, Kathy (Don) Tegtman of Stamford, Nebraska, and Polly J. Richter of South Haven, Michigan; nieces Wendy Tegtman, Kathy Louise Kent, Sheila Pabst, Karen Kramer, Mary Dawn Voisard, Jenny Richter; nephews Brad Tegtman, Gary Kent, Cory Tegtman, and Bill Richter; and friend, Yvette Louisell. Also by 16 great nieces and nephews, a great-great niece and two great-great nephews.

Mary was diagnosed with lung cancer in December 2014. Her family wishes to thank the following for the loving care given to Mary throughout her illness: Dr. Christian Schultheis and staff of Medical Associates; Hospice of Dubuque, especially Melanie and Lisa; members of the Dubuque Franciscan Community and her Franciscan Associate groups; Lisa Schmidt; and her beloved cat, Sammi.

A service of remembrance will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 13, 2015 at Clare House, Mount St. Francis, 3340 Windsor Ave., Dubuque. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be given to Opening Doors (Maria House and Teresa Shelter), 1561 Jackson St., Dubuque, IA 52001.

Mary R. Sawyer
Tribute by her sister, Polly Richter

ISU work experience:
Mary had a twenty-five year career at ISU. She taught Religious Studies, and co-founded the African American Studies Program, in which she also taught.

Highlight of their employment:
Mary had many "highlights" during her ISU career. Including, creating the Peace and Justice Internship Program, receiving the Award of Excellence in the Advancement of Human Dignity, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Award for Excellence in Community Outreach. She served as faculty chair of the Institute on National Affairs at Iowa State. In 2011, in recognition of her demonstrated commitment to the principles and goals of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King JR., she received the "Advancing One Community Award" from Iowa State University. When Mary retired in 2011 as a full professor, she was the first woman in her department to achieve that status.

Personal memory:
Mary's journey through life was never easy, but her passion for social justice was her driving force. She was a wonderfully special woman, and I was her baby sister. How very blessed I was! She loved her family, always there with a listening ear, strong advice and lots of hugs! She had MANY caring friends that she also loved. Mary enjoyed nature, and since she has been gone, I know she remains part of our lives, with the birds singing in the trees, leaves rustling down the streets, and stars that glitter and wink at us at night. Thank-you dear Mary for being my sister and my friend.

Other thoughts to share:
Mary was an avid reader with great writing talent. Mary was an avid reader and talented writer. Her book "Black Ecumenism: Implementing the Demands of Justice" was published in 1994. In 2003, her second book, "The Church on the Margins: Living Christian Community" was published. She co-edited "Peoples Temple and Black Religion in America" in 2004. Mary also published many scholarly and applied articles on African American religion and politics.


George Seifert

March 4, 1921 – December 17, 2015

George Seifert of Ames, age 94, died December 17, 2015, at Green Hills Retirement Community in Ames. George was born March 4, 1921, in Jena, Germany, to Max and Frieda Seifert. His family immigrated to the United States in 1926, and later became naturalized citizens. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Albany State Teachers College, Albany, NY in 1942. He received an MS degree in 1948 and a PhD degree, under William Feller, in 1950 from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. He also served in the U.S. Navy during WWII.

While at Cornell, George met Bertha Scheffel, a fellow student, and the two were married in Ithaca on February 5, 1948. They lived in Lincoln, NE, and Des Moines prior to moving to Ames in 1958. To this union were born two children, Curt and Edward.

George was Professor of Mathematics at ISU, from 1955 to 1991. He served as Department Chair from 1964-66. His research interests were in ordinary and delay differential equations. He was active in mathematics research his entire career, including during his retirement, having published about 90 papers. In his spare time, he was an avid tennis player and mountain climber.

Surviving him are: his sons and their wives, Curt Seifert and Sarah Nettels of Kansas City, MO, and Edward Seifert and Nancy Cameron of Shoreview, MN; two grandchildren, Katherine and Eric Seifert.

Preceding him in death were: his wife, Bertha Seifert; his parents; and his brother and sister, Eric Seifert and Charlotte Marth.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to an organization of the sender's choice.

No services are planned at this time.

George Seifert
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

George Seifert, of Ames, 94, died on Dec. 17, 2015, at Green Hills Retirement Community in Ames. George was born March 4, 1921, in Jena, Germany, to Max and Frieda Seifert. His family immigrated to the United States in 1926 and became naturalized citizens. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Albany State Teachers College in 1942. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he earned a master’s degree in 1948 and a doctorate in 1950 from Cornell University. Working under William Feller, he wrote his dissertation on Duffing’s Equation.

George took a position at the University of Nebraska and came to Iowa State in 1955. He served as chair of the Department of Mathematics from 1964 to 1966. He was instrumental in obtaining two federal grants to build Carver Hall to house and improve the applied mathematics program at ISU. A productive researcher, he worked on ordinary differential equations and branched out into the newly invigorated area of almost periodic solutions and the new area of delay differential equations. He supervised eight doctoral students and wrote over 90 published papers. Even after forced retirement in 1991 he continued his research activity.

George was a skilled tennis player, extending his game well into his eighties. Taking annual tennis trips to Florida, he won several amateur tournaments. His other passion was classical music, especially opera and chamber music.

He had a long and happy marriage to Bertha Scheffel Seifert, who preceded him in death. Surviving are two sons and their wives, Curt Seifert and Sarah Nettels, of Kansas City, Mo., and Edward Seifert and Nancy Cameron, of Shoreview, Minn., and two grandchildren, Katherine and Eric Seifert.


John “Jack” Francis Smith

May 9, 1923 – September 26, 2015

John F. "Jack" Smith, 92, died Saturday, September 26, 2015 at Mary Greeley Medical Center in Ames following a brief illness. The family will receive friends from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, September 30 at Adams Funeral Home in Ames. A Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10:30 a.m. Thursday. October 1 at St. Cecilia Catholic Church in Ames. Coffee and cookies and an opportunity to visit with family will be available at the church beginning at 9:30 a.m.

He leaves two children, Mark F. (Betty) Smith of Albuquerque, New Mexico and Letitia (Steve) Harder of Ames; five grandchildren, Brian (Annie) Smith, Sharon (Andy) Grages, Christine (Curtis) Finklea, Matt (Candy) Harder, and Chris (Jake) Harder; and two great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Evelyn, in 1994; and his brother, Jim Yurchak.

Jack was born May 9, 1923 to Peter Francis and Johanna (Spandle) Smith in Kansas City, Kansas. He grew up in Kansas City, and in Hays, which is in western Kansas. He enlisted in the Navy in 1942 and spent his service years as a fighter pilot on the carrier USS Suwannee in the South Pacific during WWII. In 1995, Jack published a book about his time aboard the Suwannee entitled, "Hellcats Over the Philippine Deep".

In 1947, he married Evelyn Ann Ross in Kansas City. They moved to Ames, Iowa in 1948 where Jack began a 40 year career as a Professor of Metallurgy at Iowa State University and Senior Scientist with the Ames Lab. Jack served as Chairman of the Department from 1966 through 1970 and he retired as Professor Emeritus in 1988. He continued to edit a scientific journal well into his 80's. Jack earned a reputation in his department as a dedicated teacher, an excellent administrator and a prolific researcher. He often said that he was one of the privileged few who got paid to do something he loved.

Aviation was also a lifelong passion. Jack logged close to 5,000 hours in approximately 150 different types of aircraft over the years. He was one of the founding members of the Silent Knights glider club in Ames and he was been actively involved in the Civil Air Patrol.

He will be remembered by all that knew him as a warm and caring man whose sense of humor was ever-present.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests a donation to the John F. Smith Scholarship Fund. Donations can be made by contacting the ISU Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

John “Jack” Francis Smith
Tribute by his son, Mark F. Smith

Prof. John F. "Jack" Smith, 92, passed away in Ames on Saturday, September 26, 2015 following a brief illness. Jack was born May 9, 1923 and grew up in Kansas City and in Hays, a small community in western Kansas. He enlisted in the Navy in 1942 and spent his active duty years as a fighter pilot on the carrier USS Suwannee in the South Pacific during WWII. In 1995, he published a book about his time aboard the Suwannee entitled, "Hellcats Over the Philippine Deep". Aviation was a lifelong passion, and Jack logged close to 5,000 hours in approximately 150 different types of aircraft, including many early jet fighters while serving as a Navy reservist in the 1950’s and 60’s. He was one of the founding members of the Silent Knights glider club in Ames, and he was actively involved in the Civil Air Patrol.

In 1947, Jack married Evelyn Ann Ross in Kansas City. They moved to Ames, Iowa, in 1948 where Jack earned a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry under Prof. Harley Wilhelm and continued on into a 40-year career as a Professor of Metallurgy at Iowa State University and a Senior Scientist/Group Leader with the Ames Lab. Jack earned a reputation in his department as a dedicated teacher, an excellent administrator, and a prolific researcher, publishing more than 200 technical articles in his career.  He often said that he was one of the privileged few who got paid to do something he loved.  

Jack served as Chairman of the ISU Metallurgy Department from 1966 through 1970, and he retired as Professor Emeritus in 1988. He remained so active with consulting work in early retirement that a colleague once asked if Jack would like to borrow a dictionary so he could look up the word “retirement”.  In 1988 Jack also began 24 years of service as the Principal Editor of the ASM Bulletin of Alloy Phase Diagrams, which later grew under his leadership into the more expansive Journal of Phase Equilibria and Diffusion.  Another highlight of his technical career is a 1996 patent for a lead-free solder alloy that he jointly developed with Iver Anderson and other colleagues at Ames Lab and at Sandia National Labs in New Mexico.  That patent ultimately saw worldwide licensing and became the all-time highest patent royalty producer for both Ames Lab and Sandia.  

Jack Smith will be remembered by all who knew him as a warm and caring man whose sense of humor was ever-present. He leaves two children, Mark F. (Betty) Smith of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Letitia (Steve) Harder of Littleton, Colorado, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

John “Jack” Francis Smith
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

John F. “Jack” Smith, a professor emeritus of materials science and engineering at Iowa State University and an associate scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory, died September 26, 2015 at the age of 92.

Jack was born May 9, 1923 to Peter Francis and Johanna (Spandle) Smith in Kansas City, Kansas. He grew up in Kansas City, and in Hays, which is in western Kansas. He enlisted in the Navy in 1942 and served as a fighter pilot on the carrier USS Suwannee. In 1995, he published a book about his time on the Suwannee titled Hellcats over the Philippine Deep.

In 1947, he married Evelyn Ann Ross in Kansas City. They moved to Ames, Iowa in 1948 where Jack began a 40-year career as a professor of metallurgy at Iowa State University and a senior scientist with the Ames Laboratory. Jack served as chairman of the department from 1966 through 1970. He earned a reputation in his department as a dedicated teacher, an excellent administrator and a prolific researcher. He often said that he was one of the privileged few who got paid to do something he loved.

With a background in metal behavior, Jack co-developed an ultrasonic method for measuring bolt tension, which improved upon the traditional torque-wrench method of measurement. The technique had wide-ranging implications for the airline industry, power plants, factories and large machines.

Jack retired from Iowa State and the Ames Laboratory in 1988, at which time he became a professor emeritus and associate scientist.

Jack was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemists in 1969 and the American Society of Metals (ASM) in 1984. He received an ISU Alumni Association Faculty Citation in June 1977. He served for 24 years as editor of the ASM Journal of Phase Equilibria and Diffusion, continuing to edit well into his 80’s. He authored more than 180 technical papers in his career, as well as a book on thorium. In 2007, Jack was named an International Member of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences.
 
Aviation was a lifelong passion for Jack, and he logged close to 5,000 hours in approximately 150 different types of aircraft over the years. He was one of the founding members of the Silent Knights glider club in Ames and he was actively involved in the Civil Air Patrol.

He is survived by two children, Mark F. (Betty) Smith of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Letitia (Steve) Harder of Ames; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Evelyn, in 1994; and his brother, Jim Yurchak.

Jack will be remembered by all that knew him as a warm and caring man whose sense of humor was ever-present.


Marian Soloman

August 12, 1930 – December 31, 2015

Marian Solomon, 85, of Ames, passed away on Dec. 31, 2015, at Mary Greeley Medical Center. A memorial service will be at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2016, at Collegiate United Methodist Church in Ames, with a visitation 30 minutes before the service.

Marian Grace Solomon was born in Austin, Minn., to Clarence and Helen (Drost) Loomer. She graduated from Austin High School in 1948 and from Hamline University with a degree in nursing in 1953. In 1953, Marian married Ted J. Solomon, a United Methodist minister and former professor of religious studies at Iowa State University and Drake University. Marian served as a nurse with the Gandhian Reconstruction Program in Sevagram, India, from 1953-54, and “mothered” 300 orphaned children who were victims of the Partition of India.

Marian was a lifelong advocate of equal rights for women, and was active in NOW, Women’s Political Caucus and Planned Parenthood. Also, Marian was an activist during the civil rights movement in the South. As secretary of a North Carolina NAACP chapter, she worked to improve conditions in black schools and urged blacks to participate in voter registration. She was among the first to bring blacks to the segregated Methodist Church in Laurinburg, N.C. Marian worked briefly with A.D. King (MLK’s brother) during the sanitation crisis in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Marian has been a dedicated international peacemaker for several decades. She participated in Witness for Peace programs in Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Marian stood with her colleagues on the Honduras-Nicaraguan border to reduce the U.S. supported Contra Militia violence against non-combatants in Nicaragua. On three occasions, she was involved in reconciliations between Israelis and Palestinians. Marian was a member of the Christian Peacemakers team in Iraq 2002, protesting the U.S. embargo and trying to prevent a U.S. invasion. Marian received numerous awards for her humanitarian service.

Marian is survived by her husband, Ted; two children, Richard, of Parker, Colo., and Rebecca (Robert) Musselman, of Ames; daughter-in-law, Linda Winston, of Richmond, Va.; four grandchildren, Jeff (Christin) Solomon, of San Diego, Eli (Meggan) Musselman, M.D., of Iowa City, Carli Solomon, of Chicago, and Joshua Solomon, of Williamsburg, Va.; and four great-grandchildren, Ana and Caly Solomon, of San Diego, and Micah and Madelynn Musselman, of Iowa City.

Marian was preceded in death by her son, Robert Solomon, M.D., of Williamsburg, Va.; and grandson, Ezekiel Musselman, of Ames.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to Collegiate United Methodist Church, 2622 Lincoln Way, Ames, IA, 50014, or to the Ames Friends Meeting, 121 South Maple Ave., Ames, IA, 50010.


Thelma Marie Stone

September 5, 1926 – September 20, 2015

Thelma Stone, age 89, of Nevada, died Sunday, September 20, 2015, at Story County Medical Center in Nevada.

Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, September 24, 2015, at Memorial Lutheran Church in Nevada, with Pastors Myron Herzberg and David Burling officiating. Burial will follow in the Nevada Municipal Cemetery. Visitation will be held at Ryan Funeral Home in Nevada on Wednesday from 5 to 7 p.m. Condolences may be sent online to www.ryanfunerals .com.

Thelma Marie Stone was born on September 5, 1926, at home in McCallsburg, to Tygo and Martha (Westre) Caltvedt. She grew up and attended school in McCallsburg, graduating from McCallsburg High School in 1944.

On August 8, 1946, Thelma was united in marriage to Jimmie Stone at Bethany Lutheran Church in McCallsburg. The couple was blessed with three children, Dennis, Lana, and Debra. Thelma and Jimmie recently marked 69 years of marriage and were a model of love and commitment for their family and community. They served as each other’s’ strength, in a marriage filled with love and friendship.

Family and church were the main focus of Thelma’s life. At Memorial Lutheran Church in Nevada, she was active in various committees, and in earlier years served as Sunday school teacher and assisted with Luther League. In the community she was a Boy Scout leader, enjoyed playing bridge, and participated in local activities. Thelma will be remembered for her caring nature, her willingness to help others, and her legendary cooking abilities.

Thelma was a dedicated worker throughout her life. She was employed at Donnelley’s with friends and neighbors, and at Iowa State University where she was beloved by the students and honored with a Dedication Brick on the wall at Alumni Center.
Thelma’s Norwegian heritage was a source of pride and celebration. In 1998, she was delighted to travel to Norway with her family to connect with her roots.

Survivors include her husband, Jimmie; two daughters, Lana (Dan) Gogerty of Ames, and Debra (John) Milligan of Washington, D.C.; four grandchildren, Nicole (Joe) Spradling of Des Moines, Nathan (Andrea) Stone of Clive, David (Jessica) Gogerty of Ankeny, and Ellen (Austin) Hames of Ankeny; eight great-grandchildren, Kevin, James, Isabelle, Katherine, Tyler, Madison, Callan, and Savannah, as well as another great-granddaughter expected in November; a sister-in-law, Marie (Wally) Loney of McCallsburg; a cousin, Joyce (Clyde) Anderson of Des Moines; as well as many nieces, nephews, and other extended family members.

She was preceded in death by her son, Dennis Stone in 2012; her parents; and eleven brothers and sisters.

Ryan Funeral Home of Nevada has been entrusted with the care of Thelma and her family.

Our family extends our heartfelt gratitude to Story County Senior Care and the Story County Hospital for all their wonderful care through Thelma’s last few years.


Patrick “Pat” John Stowell

March 17, 1937 – August 26, 2015

Patrick ‘Pat’ Stowell, age 78, of Boone, died at the Ogden Manor in Ogden on August 26, 2015.

Funeral services will be Sunday afternoon, August 30, 2015, at 3:00 p.m. at the Schroeder Memorial Chapel at Sixth and Marshall. Following the service, he will be cremated and burial of his cremains will be in the Corpus Christi Cemetery in Fort Dodge at a later date.

Patrick John Stowell was born in Fort Dodge, Iowa, on March 17, 1937, the son of Howard and Ella (Bradley) Stowell.

He graduated from Plover High School in Plover, Iowa, in 1956.

Also in 1956, Pat married JoAnn Klein and to this union a daughter Debbie and a son Scott were born. He and JoAnn later divorced.

On September 20, 1986, Pat married Patricia ‘Pat’ Moore in Boone.

He lived in Plover, Des Moines, Pocahontas, and finally Boone.

For 32 years, Pat worked as a master plumber at Iowa State University at the Ames Lab, retiring in 1995.

Pat was a member of the former Loyal Order of Elks in Boone and he enjoyed square dancing, playing cards, listening to music, bowling, and in earlier years, coaching Little League.

He is preceded in death by his parents.

Pat is survived by his wife Pat of Boone; a daughter, Debbie Haub and husband John of Osceola; a son, Scott Stowell and wife Jenny of Boone; two step daughters, Pam Lenton and husband Doug of Marengo, and Cindy Heldt of Boone; his twin sister Patricia Lawler of Boone; four grandchildren, Mike Case Haub and wife Brandy of West Des Moines, Danny Haub and wife Bobbi of Osceola, Brian Stowell of West Des Moines, and Jessica Stanley and husband David of Ankeny; four step grandchildren; 12 great grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

Friends may call at the Schroeder Memorial Chapel on Sunday from noon until 5 p.m. where the family will be present from 2 until 4 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to the family.


Victor Matthew Tamashunas

September 21, 1925 – August 22, 2015

Victor M. Tamashunas was born September 21, 1925 to immigrant parents John and Veronica (Rozman) Tamashunas in the Greenville section of Sioux City, Iowa. All of his youthful days were spent there and he remembered selling newspapers in downtown Sioux City for 3 cents - making a penny for each one sold; and that 5 cents would get you into a movie. He graduated from East High School in 1943 and then enrolled at Morningside College. Vic remained there until January of 1944, when he entered the service at Ft. Crook, NE (now Offutt AFB).

After 17 weeks of artillery basic training at Ft. Sill, OK, Vic went overseas by air from LaGuardia to Karachi. With 25 others, he formed the nucleus of the 5th Field Artillery Sound-Ranging Platoon at Ramgarh. Trained in the location and direction of artillery fire, they were assigned to the Chinese First Army and joined in the Burma campaign until the fall of Lashio. In April of '45, Vic went to China and stayed there until the war was over, serving with the army group pushing toward Canton and Hong Kong. He then was mustered out as a corporal and returned to Sioux City and Morningside College.

Vic transferred to Iowa State University in Ames, graduating in 1950 with a BS degree in general engineering. His first job was as an industrial engineer in Omaha, where he met Doris Dirks in September. They were married the following year in October and relocated to Lincoln, where Vic joined the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company as an I.E. with many diversified activities. It was in Lincoln that children John and Victoria were born. The family stayed there until 1956 when Vic elected to become part of the engineering faculty at Iowa State University, where he had a long and distinguished career. Vic started as an instructor, received his Master of Science in 1959, and became a full professor.

His memberships and honors were manifold and include: Registered Professional Engineer, Senior Member of the American Institute of IE's, Professor of the Year-College of Engineering, AIIE Region IX Engineer of the Year and Member College Advisory Council Materials Handling Institute, Vice President Region XI, American Institute of Industrial Engineers (1977-1979) and serving with Governor Ray on the Governor’s Committee on Emergency Planning & Civil Defense. He joined the Graduate Faculty in 1974 and gave thesis direction to candidates for advanced degrees from around the world. But for all of his achievements Vic valued his time with his students the most.

Vic retired as Emeritus Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering from ISU in June of 1991. His wife, Doris, died in April of 2000 and two weeks later Vic moved to the independent living complex at Windsor Oaks, living there for 14 years. In January of 2014, he moved to assisted living at Waterford.

He will always be remembered for his pride in being from Sioux City, being past National Commander of the CBIVA (China Burma India Veterans Association), his avid support of ISU’s women’s basketball team, going to see plays at Actors, the Lions Club, his book of birth dates and never forgetting one, good food (especially a good breakfast), lemon slices in his water, hot soup, dancing for Red Friars at the Memorial Union, ball room dancing at Lake Robbins, big band and swing music, concerts, a love for history and travel, being Lithuanian, and most of all having fun and spending time with his family and friends.

Vic is survived by his daughter, Vicki (Meryl) Syslo and their children, Ted and Anne, of Robbinsdale, MN; his son, John Tamashunas of Ankeny and his children, Sara (Brandon) Bice and their son Parker of Grimes: Michael (Sharon) Tamashunas and their daughter, Jamie of Ames; his special dear friend, LaVonne Schumann of Ames; and his sister-in-law, Terri Hastrieter of Humphrey, Neb. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Doris; four siblings; and his sisters-in-law, Anne Thomas and Bernadette Simms.

Thanks to McFarland Clinic (Dr. Skinner and nurse Deb), the Iowa Heart Clinic (Dr. Sorrentino and Dr. Sarda), Mary Greeley Hospice, and the staff at Waterford Assisted Living for providing such wonderful and personal care for Vic.

If you choose, memorials can be sent to Mary Greeley Hospice or to the ISU Foundation Vic Tamashunas Scholarship Fund.


Janice Ann Taylor

June 15, 1935 – March 3, 2016

Janice (Jan) Taylor, 80, of Kensett, passed away Saturday, March 5, 2016, at Mercy Medical Center North Iowa in Mason City.

Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, March 12, 2016, at Bethany Lutheran Church in Kensett with Pastor Tom Martin officiating, with burial afterwards at the Kensett Cemetery. Visitation will be held one hour prior to services at the Church. Casual attire is requested.

Jan was born June 15, 1935, in Aberdeen, South Dakota, to Clifford and Rosella (Lohman) Barber. Jan graduated from Central High School in Aberdeen in 1953. Following graduation, Jan moved to Boston to be a nanny, returning to Aberdeen in 1954. Later in 1954 she moved to Minneapolis where she met her husband, Charles (Chuck) Taylor. They married on November 16, 1956. They lived in Minneapolis until 1964 when they moved to Kensett. To this marriage three children were born, Scott David, Debra (Deb) Kay, and Brian Charles.

Jan worked at Deluxe Products in Lake Mills from 1964 until 1971, when they purchased a restaurant and bar, Chuck and Jan’s, in Kensett. Chuck passed away March 20, 1974, and Jan continued to run the business on her own, until 1977. She then worked for the Iowa State University Extension Office in Cerro Gordo County until her retirement in 1997. While working for the Extension Office she was most proud of the chick embryology program and the Crime Prevention and Safety Puppet program she started. She reached over 100,000 students with the puppet program alone. Also, while employed at the Extension Office, she served as the manager of the 4-H Food Stand, and she coordinated the Hunter Safety Education Program in Cerro Gordo County, and in 1985 she became a Chief Hunter Safety Instructor. During her time at the Extension Office she received many awards, including two Governor’s Awards.

Jan is survived by two children, Scott from Kensett, and Deb and her husband Larry Billings, from Clear Lake, “her other kid” Lisa Crees of Mena, AR; her grandson, Blake Billings, of Clear Lake; sister, Marilyn Smith and her son Wayne, of Kensett, a brother, Curt Barber of Winter Park, FL, and a special sister-in-law, Alice Barber, of LaPorte City; sister-in-law Anna Mae Taylor of Nora Springs; and sister-in-law Ardyce Gardner of Manly, and many other nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, her son Brian on October 24, 2001, her grandson Ryan Charles Billings on April 23, 2000; brothers Don Barber, and Eugene (Spud) and his wife Char Barber; sister-in-law, Jenny Barber; sisters-in-law Lola Hall and Alvina Ross; and brother-in-law, Kenneth (Bud) Taylor.


Harold Edward Theile

May 7, 1934 – January 8, 2016

Harold Edward Theile was born May 7, 1934 to Madeline Buford Comley and Harold (Dodd) Edward Theile in Centerville, Iowa. He attended school in Centerville, graduating with the class of 1952. His ties to Centerville were life-long; sharing his history of a wonderful life to others. That Centerville network extended from elementary through high school, college, and as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy.

After graduating from Iowa State University (ISU) in 1956, Harry was commissioned in the Navy where he met Fran while stationed in Charleston, S.C. They married February 4, 1961 and moved to Iowa. Harry returned to ISU to complete his master’s degree and continued working with ISU for almost 30 years with the Center for Professional and Executive Development (CPED), ISU Business Extension, retiring in 1994.

Harry loved sports, especially football and ISU athletics, sailing, getting together with friends and road trips to destinations unknown. He loved to laugh and live life to the fullest. He was loved by all.

He is survived by his wife, Fran Theile; four daughters, Leanne (Larry) Findlay, Amy (Curtis) Maly, Susan Theile and Julie (Patrick) Elefson; six grandchildren, Amanda Mulford, Matthew Mulford, Monica Maly, Rachel Maly, Skyeler Elefson and Trysten Elefson; his brother, John Robert "Bob" (Karen) Theile; and his cousin, Jerilyn (Dean) Vanatta.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Good Neighbor Emergency Assistance in Ames (515.296.1449) or Mary Greeley Medical Center Hospice (515.239.6877)


William “Bill” Dean Thomas

July 13, 1937 – October 26, 2015

A visitation for William “Bill” Thomas, 78 of Boone, IA will be Thursday, October 29, 2015 with the family present to greet friends from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at Schroeder Funeral Home on the corner of 5th and Story Street. According to Bill’s wishes, his body has been donated to the University of Iowa Department of Anatomy. Memorials are suggested to the family to be designated at a later time. Online condolences may be left at www.schroederfuneral.com

William “Bill” Dean Thomas, son of Daniel William Thomas and Verna Marie Helkenn Thomas, was born July 13, 1937 in Holstein, IA. Bill died October 26, 2015 at Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, IA at the age of 78 years.

Bill grew up in Sioux City, IA and graduated from Sioux City Central in 1955. He joined the United States Navy and was later honorably discharged. Bill then attended Iowa State University in Ames, IA and graduated with a Master’s Degree in Electrical Engineering/Computer Science.

On August 23, 1958, Bill was united in marriage to Patricia Lorraine Dames in Sioux City, IA. They were the parents of one son Michael. They made their home in Sioux City, IA until moving to Ames in 1962. In 1971, they moved to Boone, IA where they have continued to live.

Bill worked for Iowa State University Ames Laboratory until retiring in 1999. Bill loved to stay busy, whether it was building a car, designing and building houses, woodworking, and master gardening. In his late years he enjoyed putting puzzles together.

Bill was preceded in death by his parents; his brother Allan; and his father-in-law Clifford Dames. He is survived by his wife Patricia of Boone, IA; his son Michael (Cynthia) Thomas of Huxley, IA; 3 grandchildren: Joseph Thomas, Alexander Thomas, and Olivia Thomas; mother-in-law: Arlene Dames of Boone, IA; sisters-in-law: Carole Weber and family of Red Oak, IA, and Carla Glass and family of Ruckersville, VA; other relatives; and many friends.


Richard L. “Dick” Thuma

January 31, 1927 – March 11, 2016

Richard L. “Dick” Thuma, 89, of Iowa City and formerly of Mt. Pleasant, died Friday, March 11, 2016 at the Briarwood Health Care Center in Iowa City.

A Memorial Celebration of Life service for Dick Thuma will be held at 11:00 AM on Wednesday, March 16 at the First United Methodist Church, 309 North Main Street, Mt. Pleasant. The Reverend Deborah J. Stowers, Senior Pastor, will officiate. Friends may greet the family 1 hour prior to the service at the church. A time of fellowship and a luncheon will be served in the church’s Fellowship Hall immediately following the memorial service. The Kimzey Funeral Home, 213 North Main Street, Mount Pleasant, is assisting the family with the arrangements.

Richard Leroy “Dick” Thuma was born January 31, 1927 in Hays, Kansas. He was the son of Clarence Ellsworth and Edith (Geesling) Thuma. He graduated from Hiawatha (Kansas) High School and enrolled at Kansas State College in Manhattan. After one semester and just before his 18th birthday, Dick enlisted in the United States Navy. He was sent to the Great Lakes Training Station in Chicago and then to the Naval Training School in Farragut, ID. Upon completing encephalographic training, he was stationed at the San Leando naval Hospital in San Francisco. Upon his honorable discharge in 1945, he returned to Kansas State and graduated in 1950.

Dick continued his education as he was accepted into the Agronomy Dept. at Iowa State University. He was conferred with his Master’s Degree in 1952. The Iowa State Extension Service hired him as a youth assistant in Adair County, and in 1953, he became the Extension Director of Union County at Creston. On April 18, 1953 in Donnellson, IA, Richard was united in marriage to Nancy Carol Redfern.

In 1958, Henry County hired Dick as the ISU Extension Director, a position he held for 31 years. In retirement, he spent summers as a crop inspector for Pioneer Seed Company. Dick and Nancy moved to Iowa City in 2002 to be near family.

Mr. Thuma was a longtime member of the First United Methodist Church in Mt. Pleasant, and a current member of St. Mark’s United Methodist Church in Iowa City. He was a former member of the Mt. Pleasant Kiwanis Club. Dick had served on the Mt. Pleasant Community School District School Board and was a past president of the board. He was a member of the National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACAA0 from whom, in recognition to his service to Henry County, received the Distinguished Service Award. Dick enjoyed flowers, especially roses, iris and the beautiful hostas he raised. Dick and Nancy traveled often, going to national parks, Sanibel Island, FL and attending Elderhostels.

Those thankful for sharing in Dick’s life include his wife of 62 years, Nancy of Iowa City; 3 daughters – Jane Woline of Ames, IA, Susan Rew and her husband Terry of Iowa City and Ann Thuma of Iowa City; a sister – Mary Lou Carpenter and her husband Dewey of Kansas City, KS; 11 grandchildren – Emily (Perry) Miller of Greensburg, PA; Laura (Zach) Setmire of Brookline, NH; Linnea (Nicholas) Hall of Deerfield, MA; Ben (Tigon) Woline of Ankeny; Chris (Tara) Rew of San Antonio, TX; Katelyn, Corey and Jeremy Rew, all of Iowa City; Lynn (Dan) Sedam and Matthew Riley, all of Blaine, MN and Beth (Drew) Scholefield of Sierra Vista, AZ; 13 great grandchildren – Ellie, Ethan, Elijah and Ehren Miller; William, Thomas and Michael Setmire; Riorden and Mirela Woline; Gabriel Sedam and Patrick, Ayla and Xander Scholefield.

His parents precede Dick in death.

Those considering an expression of sympathy may direct memorials to the Rowe Sand Hill Crane Sanctuary in Gibbon, NE, the Heifer Project International or Midwest Old Threshers.


Walter John Toporek

August 18, 1935 – July 27, 2015

“Life is revealed in wandering.” - Walter Toporek, 1995

“The meaning of existence is that existence has meaning” - Walter Toporek, nd

Walter John Toporek was born to Katarzyna and Wladyslaw Toporek in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on August 18, 1935. He is remembered by his sister, Stephanie Eunson, his children, Rebecca, Cynthia, Veronica Cox, and Daniel, his four grandchildren, his children's mother, nieces, nephews, and dear friends.

He was retired from Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa where he had been an Associate Professor of Architecture. Prior to Iowa State University, he had also held a faculty position at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. He graduated with a Bachelors of Architecture from the University of Manitoba in 1958 with honors and achieved a Masters of Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania in 1963.

He loved to garden and his yard was overflowing with native Iowa flowers and plants. He was seen around town almost every day wandering through the local parks, the downtown area, campus town and the public library… he was the man with the long white beard and many would mistake him for Santa Claus, especially in the wintertime.

He passed away peacefully on July 27, 2015 at Bethany Life in Story City, Iowa. A memorial service will be held at Bethany Life, 212 Lafayette, Story City on Wednesday, August 19 at 3:00 pm. Following the service, Walter’s family Invites you to join them for a walk at Ada Hayden Heritage Park, 5205 Grand Ave, Ames.


Charles E. (Chuck) Townsend

December 11, 1923 – January 12, 2013

Age 89 of Arden Hills died peacefully January 12, 2013 at home at Lake Johanna Shores in Arden Hills, Minnesota. He had recently been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Memorial services will be held on Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 1 pm at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Des Moines, Iowa and on Tuesday February 26, 3:45 pm at Johanna Shores Chapel, 3220 Lake Johanna Blvd, Arden Hills, Minnesota.

Chuck was born in Des Moines, December 11, 1923 to Clarence McNutt and Pauline (Townsend) McNutt. After his mother died he was raised by grandparents, Charles and Winifred Furr Townsend.

He married Marilyn Groves on June 13, 1943. Childhood friends, Marilyn and Chuck were married for 64 years until Marilyn passed away in 2008.

During World War Two Chuck served in the Army's 914th Engineers Company in the Pacific. He graduated from the University of Iowa with a Master of Fine Arts in 1950. He established a career as a graphic designer and commercial artist for Look magazine, Wesley Day Agency, and other firms. Chuck was a founder of the Art Directors Association of Iowa. He later joined the faculty at Iowa State University's College of Art and Design.

After retirement he and Marilyn traveled, enjoyed their grandchildren and great grandson and Chuck continued his print making and other interests.

Chuck is lovingly remembered by his daughter Pam (Harry) Postal of Stockton CA; son Charlie (Sherry) Townsend of Mendota Heights MN; grandchildren, Lisa, Ben, Susie, Jimmie and Beth and great grandson, Neal.

Memorial contributions may be directed to St. Luke's Episcopal Church 3424 Forest Ave., Des Moines, IA 50310.


Richard Vaughn

January 17, 1925 – January 31, 2016

On the morning of Sunday, January 31, 2016, Richard passed away peacefully of natural causes. Richard was being visited and comforted by family members at his home in Ames, IA at the time of his passing. He was 91 years old.

Richard was born in the town of Ionia, MI at his mother's house on January 17th 1925. He was the only child of Forrest and Alice Vaughn. He grew up on his grandparents' farm and attended grade school in a one-room schoolhouse. He then graduated Ionia high school.

Richard was a veteran of World War II and served as a second class signalman in the Navy and second reserve in the Coast Guard for three years. He was in the Navy reserve for two years. Richard received his Bachelor's degree at Michigan State College in December of 1948. He then went on to receive his Masters of Industrial Engineering degree at Toledo University.

Richard and Frances Foreman were married in March 18, 1947 and had five daughters. They lived in Gainesville, FL where he was a professor of industrial engineering at the University of Florida for 5 years. They moved to Ames, IA in 1962 where he was a professor of industrial engineering at Iowa State University for 25 years. During that time he wrote three textbooks to facilitate his curriculums.

Richard always enjoyed staying active and fit by running and playing racquet ball. His love and passion for the game of golf allowed him to compete in many golf events including several Masters Tournaments. His love for the outdoors was perpetuated by canoeing and camping with family in the Boundary Waters in northern Minnesota. He was also an avid hiker.

Richard was preceded in death by Forrest and Alice Vaughn.

Richard is survived by his wife, Frances Vaughn and his five daughters Bonnie Ward, Barbara Hyde, Carolyn Takel, Vicki Simons and Beth Torgeson.

At Richard's request, there will not be a funeral or memorial service. He didn't want a big fuss made over him. Instead he will be cremated and placed on the fireplace mantel at his home until his wife Frances passes. The urns will then be transported to Harrison, Michigan and a wake will be arranged at that time.

Happiness!


John G. Verkade

January 15, 1935 – April 6, 2016

John G. Verkade, entered into God's presence April 6, 2016, following a 15-month illness. He was born of Dutch immigrant parents, Gerrit and Dirkje (Van Leeuwen) Verkade, in Chicago, Illinois on January 15, 1935. His primary education took place at the Roseland Christian School and his secondary education at Tilden Technical High School (both in Chicago) where he graduated in 1952 as Salutatorian of his class. John then entered the University of Illinois on a George M. Pullman Educational Foundation Scholarship where he graduated with High Honors with a B.S. in Chemistry in 1956.

After receiving an M.A. in Chemistry from Harvard University in 1957, he went back to the University of Illinois where he received a Monsanto Graduate Fellowship to work with Professor Standish Piper on his Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry which he received in 1960. He began his academic career the same year at Iowa State University as an Instructor of Chemistry. He subsequently rose through the academic ranks, becoming a full Professor in 1971 and University Professor in 1997.

During his 53-year career at Iowa State, he enjoyed doing research and teaching undergraduate as well as graduate courses. His collaborations with his coworkers (25 BS, 18 MS, 37 PhD and 60 Post-Doctoral students) on a variety of research projects led to the publication of 5 books, 21 patents and 428 papers.

In his first year at ISU he published the first synthesis of a football-shaped organophosphorus compound which the fire retardant industry adopted as an effective starting material for producing a wide spectrum of commercial fire retardant formulations which are still used today. Since John’s initial publication, this compound has been available from over a dozen chemical manufacturers, and over 1500 publications have appeared on its chemistry.

In the early 1970’s, he invented a novel pedagogical tool for teaching a complex subject (namely, molecular orbitals) in a simple pictorial way to chemistry undergraduate and graduate students. He published several papers (some with ISU chemistry Professors Klaus Ruedenberg and Gordon Miller) on the method and he also wrote a book on the subject, the second edition of which is still available.

Toward the end of the 1980’s, his research interests shifted to the challenge of synthesizing a new football-shaped organophosphorus compound which turned out to be a powerful catalyst for a wide variety of important organic reactions. The building block molecules accessible via reactions promoted by his “superbases” (as they became known in the chemical community) are useful in the production of several types of useful pharmaceuticals which are products of organic syntheses usually comprised of several chemical “building block” steps. Although his patent on these compounds expired in 2008, over a dozen companies worldwide continue to sell his superbases.

In 2005 John and his Department colleague Professor George Kraus discovered that a 2% solution of a cheap calcium salt in anhydrous ammonia effectively kills a favorite illicit way of “cooking” meth from OTC cold medicines. This illicit method involves the use of liquid ammonia (obtained by theft from agricultural anhydrous ammonia tanks) as the solvent.

John was an active member of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and served in a number of capacities such as Chair of its Publications Committee, its Committee on Grants and Awards, its Chemical Abstracts Services Committee, and as Chair of the Editorial Board of “Chemical and Engineering News”, its house organ. He was also elected to membership of the ACS Board of Directors. He regularly called the ACS national council meetings to order with a trumpet call. Among the numerous awards he won during his career are an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the Harry and Carol Mosher ACS Section Award, a BF Goodrich Collegiate Inventors Program Award, Election to the Tilden Technical High School Hall of Fame, Dept. of Chemistry/Ames National Laboratory Outstanding Mentor Award, Iowa State University Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research, Fellow of the American Chemical Society, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Midwest ACS Award for Meritorious Contributions to Chemistry.

John was a member of the Trinity Christian Reformed Church in Ames, of which he was a founder in 1960 and in which he served for many years as Elder, council member, organist, pianist and trumpet player. He was also the founding member of the Tarnished Brass Quintet in the early 1980s. He was the first President of the Central Iowa Symphony of which he was a member of the trumpet section for more than 20 years. He also played trumpet in the Ames Municipal Band for 35 years. His favorite hobbies included home schooling two of his grandchildren in general science and in chemistry, making music, and exploring the intersection of religion and science.

He is survived by his wife, Charlene (Nunnikhoven); children, Elaine Burn, Geoffrey (Robin) Verkade and Cyndi Bowlby; grandchildren, Craig De Vries, Kaylen Bowlby, Tristan Verkade and Amelia Verkade; former wife, Mary (Betty) Verkade; and nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Susan Elizabeth (Trexel) Verkade; his brothers, Gerrit and Andrew; and one nephew.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts can be made to Trinity Christian Reformed Church or The George M. Pullman Educational Foundation.

John G. Verkade
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

John G. Verkade, University Professor Emeritus, passed away April 6, 2016, at the age of 81. Born January 15, 1935, in Chicago to Dutch immigrant parents, John received his B.S. degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1956. After receiving his M.A. degree at Harvard University in 1957, he returned to the University of Illinois where he received his Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry in 1960. In the same year, he joined the ISU chemistry faculty as an Instructor, which was the normal starting appointment at that time. He was subsequently promoted to Assistant Professor (1962), Associate Professor (1966), Professor (1971), and University Professor (1997).
 
John was widely-known for his research in organic compounds that contain phosphorus atoms. Several of these compounds behave as very strong bases that catalyze a variety of reactions. The most famous of these “superbases” is “Verkade’s base”, which is cited extensively in the chemical literature and used by chemists around the world as a catalyst for the synthesis of numerous organic compounds. John published more than 425 scientific papers on his research, which included the work of many students (25 BS, 18 MS, 37 PhD, and 60 Postdocs) whose research was guided by John. He presented lectures on his research studies at universities and conferences around the world. John also sought practical applications of his research discoveries by working on projects that led to 21 patents.

He taught chemistry courses ranging from general chemistry to graduate courses in special topics in inorganic chemistry. In his general chemistry courses, he especially enjoyed sprinkling his lectures with dramatic experiments such as explosions and unexpected color changes. He was also known to regularly include a joke, which often elicited groans from his freshman students. His theatrical tendencies extended to trumpet fanfares for retiring faculty members and special ceremonies in the chemistry department. He shared his musical talents on the trumpet, piano, and organ with many organizations at ISU and in the Ames community.

He was also very active at the national level in the American Chemical Society (ACS), an organization of 160,000 chemists. He served on the Board of Directors, as well as on publications, grants, and education committees. His contributions to chemistry were recognized by awards from the ACS, ISU and other scientific organizations.

He is survived by his wife Charlene, his three children, and four grandchildren.

John G. Verkade
Tribute by his Family

Dr. John G. Verkade, University Professor Emeritus, born January 15, 1935 to Dutch immigrant parents, passed away April 6, 2016, following an illustrious, 53-year career in the ISU Chemistry Department. He was torn between music and chemistry as a career, because he had been awarded a handsome scholarship to major in piano performance at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. But his father advised him that it was easier to make a decent living in science than music.

He was granted an interview at ISU in spite of a disastrous dinner to which he and his wife had invited a visiting ISU faculty member. They were just about to sit down to eat in their humble student apartment when one of the legs on their el-cheapo card table (the only table they owned) decided to buckle, spilling almost everything to the floor. Fortunately, the visiting faculty member was very gracious about the mishap.

The Department Chair at the time John was hired was, in his words, a crusty character, often lacking intact and diplomacy, with a reputation for insulting fellow colleagues. After he received tenure, John enjoyed getting back at him by parking his beat up 14-year-old Dodge next to the Chair's big, black, impressive, late model, Cadillac sedan in the faculty parking lot. One day the Chair approached him in the hall and asked "Verkade! Don't we pay you enough to buy a better car than that?" To which John replied truthfully and good naturedly, "No sir!" The Chair was not amused.

John thrived on research and teaching. He would often remark how he got paid to have fun every day. As a researcher in the area of phosphorus chemistry, he established a world-wide reputation and won numerous awards. As a teacher, he set high standards for his students, but he would also go the extra mile to help them if they would ask. He helped to home school two of his grandchildren in science and chemistry, and was undoubtedly pleased and proud when one of them last fall decided to follow in his grandfather's footsteps and major in chemistry at ISU.

Throughout his lifetime, John also continued to pursue his passion for music. He learned to play the trumpet at the age of 45, and was a member of the Central Iowa Symphony and the Ames Municipal Band for many years. He also founded the Tarnished Brass Quintet which provided music for many ISU Memorial Day services. He faithfully served God as organist, pianist, and trumpet player (in addition to other positions of leadership) at the Ames church which he helped found in 1960.

His family and friends will remember John Verkade as a humble, good-natured and gracious man who generously shared his time, his talents, and his treasures.


Marian L. Wallace

February 5, 1922 – February 24, 2016

Marian Louise Wallace was born February 5, 1922 to Adelbert E. and Bessie (Flower) Wallace in Jackson, Minnesota. Marian graduated from Jackson High School in 1939. She attended Iowa State College from 1939 to 1941 and then Minneapolis Business College from 1941 to 1942.

She was employed at the Director's Office at the Agricultural Experiment Station at Iowa State College from 1942 to 1949. Marian moved back to Jackson and worked at First National Bank from 1950 to 1980. Moving back to Ames, Marian was employed from 1982 at the Statistical Laboratory at Iowa State University until her retirement in 1985.

Marian was a member of Northminster Presbyterian Church in Ames and the Story County Genealogical Society. She most recently resided at Northcrest Communities in Ames until her death on February 24, 2016, at the age of 94 years and 19 days.

Surviving Marian include her cousins, Mrs. Jane Markey of Marshalltown and Mrs. Jean Deasy of Cedar Rapids; and friends, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Johnson of Austin, Minnesota, Mrs. Lou Shellhorn of Longmont, Colorado, Mrs. Dorothy Dykstra of Jackson, Mrs. Marcella McMahon of Cerritos, California, Mrs. Dee Halferty, and Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Schlager.

Marian was preceded in death by her parents.

Marian L. Wallace
Tribute by her cousin, Jane Markey

My cousin Marian did everything with passion and perfection. She returned to Ames where she bought a beautiful house and hosted many family reunions. She compiled a detailed genealogy. She kept very busy with historical projects from her hometown of Jackson, MN. She traveled widely in Europe and the states. She loved her church, her ISU job, nature, gardening, birds, dogs, and good music. These are among my best treasured memories of Marian. I was so fortunate to have her as a cousin.

Jane Markey


Thomas Anthony Weber

January 27, 1934 – April 8, 2016

Thomas Anthony Weber, 82, of Denver, passed away April 8, 2016.

He was born January 27, 1934 in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Max and Beatrice (Hartman) Weber.

He was a graduate of De Paul Academy for high school in Chicago. He then attended De Paul University for undergraduate and received his Doctorate in Physics from Notre Dame University.

On August 22, 1959, he married Gretchen Greenwood.

He taught Physics at Iowa State University for many years, retiring as Professor Emeritus.

Tom was always involved in local Democratic politics. He was also a member of St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Ames, IA where he was involved on the Parish Council. Tom was also on the Public Arts Commission in the City of Ames. He was a regular at the Friday Seminars group.

Tom enjoyed mountain climbing, hiking, good beer, baseball steaks, traveling, wise-assery, and enjoying a good bonfire. He also loved explosives particularly fireworks, dogs, children, a good scotch, and most of all, he loved his wife, Gretchen.

Thomas is survived by Four Daughters, Madeleine W. (Kevin) O'Connell, Mary B. Weber, Catherine S. (Sandy) Veit and Elizabeth A. (William) Berg; Three Grandchildren, Tom Berg, Katie Berg and Nick Berg; Niece, Susan (Michael Scott) Moyer-Scott and Two Cousins, Rosemary "Molly" Larson, Raymond Flood.

He is preceded in death by Wife, Gretchen Hayes Weber, Father, Max Weber, Mother, Beatrice Weber and Sister, Patricia Moyer.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Colorado Chapter of The Alzheimer's Association.


Robert Irving Wessel

March 7, 1926 – September 24, 2015

It is fitting that the beginning of the end of Bob Wessel's life started in Canada in his beloved cabin after spending a week with family. He fell and broke his hip. Bob loved to travel and had visited and/or lived in Denmark, Spain, Italy, Germany, England, The Netherlands, Greece, Turkey, and the Azores (Port.). But he felt most content in his cabin on Eagle River in Canada.

He loved the untarnished and undeveloped home away from home. He could sit on the dock or in a boat for hours fishing. It didn't matter whether he caught a fish, he just wanted to be there.

Robert Irving Wessel passed away Sept. 24 from complications from surgery from his fall in August. Bob was born on March 7, 1926 in Manson, Iowa. He was the son of Bessie (Jeffords) and Lawrence Wessel, a carpenter. The fifth in a family of 10 children raised during the depression, he spent much of his early childhood in Belmond, Iowa. The Wessel family moved to Ames in 1939. In 1944 Bob graduated from Ames High School; in 1952 he received a BA in history from ISU; an MA in history from ISU and in 1966, he received his PhD. from the University of Minnesota. He returned to teach at ISU from 1967 - 1987. He retired to teach on military bases in Europe.

"The fact that a great many people believe something is no guarantee of its truth." -W. Somerset Maugham, The Razor's Edge. Bob related to this book as he spent much time in self-reflection and wanderlust.

Bob didn't want us to talk about his degrees and he was happy not to use the title "Dr." He loved to teach; he loved to travel, he loved left-leaning politics and he loved his family: wife, children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and more. Bob's family extended well beyond blood.

He had a heart for those who had less than him. As a child, he did not know, from day to day, if he would have food to eat. Bob's biggest fear was that the generations to come would forget what it was like to go hungry. He was passionate about serving the poor, worked for civil rights for all and was passionate about preserving the environment.

Following high school, Bob joined that Army Air Corps but failed to find meaning as a nose gunner. He concluded that war is not the answer and became a peace activist. He challenged the US involvement in Viet Nam and elsewhere.

In addition to his time in Canada, Bob had a deep love for travel and in particular cherished the time he spent in Denmark and Turkey. He often pointed out the things that most affected his life: his childhood during the Depression, where he saw and felt what poverty was; his years in the army at the end of World War II, where he saw and came to believe in the idea of rules for rules sake as meaningless; and his year in Denmark (1949-1950) where he learned what it means for the government to take responsibility for the health and care of all of its citizens. It was in Denmark that he found his political place and it was from these things his life grew.

In 1973 Bob and Edith took the family to Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Germany so he could introduce his family to his love of travel and the ability to appreciate and love other cultures.

As a part of his commitment to others, Bob, and his beloved wife Edith, were active in their church life, pushing the church to be more involved in caring for others through food banks or homeless shelters, always believing that in Christ we are called to serve. In all ways his life reflected his respect and compassion for people of all faiths and economic resources.

Bob was a voracious reader, loved classical music, strong cheese, Greek salads and a good argument. He was a compassionate contrarian.

At the center of Bob's life was his family. He met his Edith at a Lutheran Student Association meeting in 1951. They were married for more than 63 years.

Bob is survived by his children Keith Wessel (Lori) of Madison, Wisconsin, and their blended family including sons, Sven Irwin (wife Heather, daughters Kinley, Kianna), Erik Irwin (wife Chelsea, daughters Aishe, Jayla and Avannah) and Matthew; Ellen Schuler (Jeff) of Stevens Point, Wisconsin and their daughters Eleni (husband Will, son Asher), Hannah and Sophie; Beth Wessel Kroeschell (Tom) of Ames, Iowa, their daughter Liza and son Robbie; Cheryl Wessel of Oak Harbor, Ohio and her daughter Kiri; Joanne Ellarson of Mazomanie, Wisconsin and her sons Wesley and Casey.

Bob is also survived by his sisters Katherine Eschbach of Ames, Betty Dodge and Donna Erickson of Shawnee, Oklahoma and a brother Tom Wessel of Bozeman, Montana. Bob was preceded in death by his parents and brothers Carrol, Clair, Chester and James Wessel and sister Helen Policastri.

Memorials may be given to Emergency Housing in Ames, Doctors Without Borders or a charity of your choice . A visitation will be held at St. Andrews Church in Ames Sunday, Sept. 27 from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. A celebration of life service will be held at 11 am Monday, Sept. 28 at the St. Andrews Lutheran Church in Ames.

Robert Irving Wessel
Faculty Senate Memorial Resolution

Robert Irving Wessel passed away Sept. 24 from complications from surgery from his fall in August.

Bob was born on March 7, 1926 in Manson, Iowa. He was the son of Bessie (Jeffords) and Lawrence Wessel, a carpenter. The fifth in a family of 10 children raised during the depression, he spent much of his early childhood in Belmond, Iowa. The Wessel family moved to Ames in 1939. In 1944 Bob graduated from Ames High School; in 1952 he received a BA in history from ISU; an MA in history from ISU and in 1966, he received his PhD. from the University of Minnesota. He returned to teach at ISU in the Department of Political Science from 1967 - 1987. He retired to teach on military bases in Europe.

He had a heart for those who had less than him. As a child, he did not know, from day to day, if he would have food to eat. Bob's biggest fear was that the generations to come would forget what it was like to go hungry. He was passionate about serving the poor, worked for civil rights for all and was passionate about preserving the environment.

Following high school, Bob joined the Army Air Corps but failed to find meaning as a nose gunner. He concluded that war is not the answer and became a peace activist. He challenged the US involvement in Vietnam and elsewhere. In addition to his time in Canada, Bob had a deep love for travel and in particular cherished the time he spent in Denmark and Turkey.

He often pointed out the things that most affected his life: his childhood during the Depression, where he saw and felt what poverty was; his years in the army at the end of World War II, where he saw and came to believe in the idea of rules for rules sake as meaningless; and his year in Denmark (1949-1950) where he learned what it means for the government to take responsibility for the health and care of all of its citizens.

It was in Denmark that he found his political place and it was from these things his life grew. Bob was a voracious reader, loved classical music, strong cheese, Greek salads and a good argument. He was a compassionate contrarian.

At the center of Bob's life was his family. He met his Edith at a Lutheran Student Association meeting in 1951. They were married for more than 63 years.

Bob is survived by his wife, Edith, his children Keith Wessel (Lori) and family of Madison, Wisconsin; Ellen Schuler (Jeff) and family of Stevens Point, Wisconsin; Beth Wessel Kroeschell (Tom) and family of Ames, Iowa; Cheryl Wessel and daughter of Oak Harbor, Ohio; Joanne Ellarson and sons of Mazomanie, Wisconsin. Bob is also survived by his three sisters and a brother.


Geraldine Wessman

July 15, 1926 – December 12, 2012

Geraldine Risdal Hilker Wessman was born July 15, 1926 to Christ and Marie Risdal of Roland, Iowa. Geraldine married her first husband, Dale Hilker of Roland, in 1947, and had four children. She married her second husband, Garner Wessman of Ames, in 1969, and had five step-children.

Geraldine worked as a lab tech in the Agronomy Department at Iowa State University. She was also a lab tech at the National Animal Disease Center until her retirement in the late eighties. Geraldine started the first Brownie group in the 50's at Roland and was active with her daughters in Girl Scouts and 4-H.

She enjoyed sewing, bowling, square dancing, golfing and raising her children. She was a member of various women groups and served on membership and serving committees. Golf was her passion in her retirement years.

Geraldine passed away on Tuesday morning, December 12, 2012, at the Oakwood Care Center in Clear Lake, Iowa at 86 years of age.

She is survived by her four children, Gloria Hilker, Carol Hilker Ryan, Dean (Karen) Hilker, and Rick Hilker; two brothers, Gerald Risdal and Robert Risdal; two sisters, Margaret Risdal Strum and Blanche Risdal Hill; and as well as her 5 step-children, Steve (Kay) Wessman, Scott Wessman, John (Ann) Wessman, Neil (Peg) Wessman, Ann Wessman; nine grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

Geraldine was preceded in death by her parents; both of her husbands; one brother, Rudolph Risdal; and one grandchild.

A burial service will be scheduled midsummer 2013. If interested in attending, please tell the family.

Sympathy cards may be sent to: Gloria Hilker, 209 6th Ave South, Clear Lake, Iowa 50428.


Nina Pauline Williams

October 20, 1928 – July 19, 2015

Nina Pauline Williams, 86, of Ames, passed away at her home on Sunday, July 19, 2015. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 22, at Adams Funeral Home in Ames. Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, July 23, at First United Methodist Church in Ames. Burial will be in Ames Municipal Cemetery.

Paulie was born on Oct. 20, 1928, in Ames to Edwin and Vida (McIntosh) Gibbs. She was a proud lifelong resident of Ames and member of Ames High Class of ’46. She attended Iowa State University for one year before meeting her “best man,” Robert Williams, of Fond du Lac, Wis. They were married in Ames on August 29, 1948.

Paulie was employed as secretary for the ISU Theatre Department, Hilton Coliseum and the Memorial Union in the 1960s and ’70s. Paulie was a member of First United Methodist Church, Church Women United, Gilbert Women’s Club, International Women’s Club of Merida Yucatan, Triple G Square Dance Club, Kappa Phi Alumni (University of Christian Women), and helped organize the Older Women’s League of Ames. Paulie was instrumental in the preservation of the old Ames High School building which then became Ames City Hall. She and Bob helped found the Merida English Language Library, during their many trips to Yucatan.

Paulie is survived by her husband, Robert (Bob), of Ames; two daughters, Jeannine (Rick) Massengale, of Newnan, Ga., and Nancy (Gus) Brinkman, of Rolfe; 13 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; sister, Margaret Ann Glover; sister-in-law, Susan Williams; brother-in-law, Donald Williams; and 17 nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents; infant son, Steven Thomas; son, David Robert, daughter-in-law, Sue (Lillegraven) Williams; and brothers, Myrus, Earl, Lauren (Bud), and her twin brother, Paul.

In lieu of flowers, monetary gifts may be designated to the family for memorials to be decided at a later date.


Darrel Dean Zunkel

September 26, 1934 – June 11, 2015

Darrel Dean Zunkel was born September 26, 1934 to Paul and Ella Zunkel in Pilot Mound, Iowa. He graduated from Pilot Mound High School in 1952. Darrel farmed in Pilot Mound where he lived most of his life before retiring and moving to Ames in the fall of 1998. Darrel and Judith Smith were married on March 7, 1959 in Madrid, Iowa. Darrel served many years as a volunteer fireman for the Pilot Mound Fire Department, served on the Grand Community School Board, and was involved in various positions within the Pilot Mound Methodist Church and at First United Methodist Church in Ames.

Darrel began playing men's fastpitch softball when he was 14 years old. He played for the Boxholm Swedes, Boone Merchants, Des Moines Bombers, and many tournaments for surrounding towns. In 1981, Darrel was inducted into the Iowa Men's Fastpitch Softball Hall of Fame, where he later served as a board member.

Darrel died at 80 years of age on Thursday, June 11, 2015 at Israel Family Hospice House.

Darrel is survived by his wife of 56 years, Judy Zunkel; his sons, Gary (Karen) Zunkel, of Ames, Gayle Zunkel, of Nevada, Jon (Noel) Zunkel, of Madrid and Kurt (Angie) Dickerson, of Phoenix, Arizona; his daughter, Denise (Brian) Fowler, of Pleasant Hill; his grandchildren, Paul and Jacob Zunkel, Owen and Daniel Zunkel, Jordan and Bryce Dickerson and Jessica and Lindsay Fowler; his sisters, Pauline Kuhl and Janet Elliott; his brother-in-law, Larry (Kaye) Smith; his sisters-in-law, Sherry (Fred) Good and Ruth Ann (Frank) Walker; and many nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents; Judy's parents, Dwight and Ruth Smith; a brother-in-law, Don Kuhl; and brother and sister-in-law, Ronald and Nancy Dickerson.

Darrel never met a stranger and will be missed by his many friends and family members.

In lieu of flowers, memorial may be directed to the Bliss Cancer Center, Israel Family Hospice House, or First United Methodist Church.

 

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