Iowa State University Alumni Association
 

Fall 2017 Course Catalog

Dear Colleagues:

Do you have the Fall 2017 open house marked on your calendar? If not, be sure to add Thursday, Aug. 10 from 10:30 –11:30 a.m. because that will be your first opportunity to register for interesting classes and trips. Please note the open house is in the morning, not the afternoon. The curriculum committee continues to put together unique lifelong learning opportunities each session.

Have you noticed what’s different with the catalog? We are now using color to enhance its appearance on the inside and outside. The online pdf version of the catalog has been in full color for a couple of years. Beginning this fall we are also creating a “publicity” version of the catalog that will also be in color. This slimmed-down version of the catalog will include information about how to be a member, the membership benefits, basic policies and procedures, the classes-by-the-day chart, abbreviated class descriptions, registration forms, and the list of committee members. The “publicity” catalogs will be delivered to libraries, retirement communities, doctors’ offices, etc. If you know of a spot where these catalogs could be displayed or if you belong to a group where you can talk about OLLI at ISU, stop by the office for some copies to share.

There are 28 classes and three day trips (one each in September, October, and November) with the first trip scheduled on the Friday before classes begin. During the fall session, classes will be held here at the ISU Alumni Center, DMACC Boone Campus, Wheatsfield, Hy-Vee West, and Cooks’ Emporium.

Please note the OLLI classes vary in length and some require supplies, two factors which has an effect on the fees. There are also some classes that are beginning at a different time than normal. For example, the Eat Healthy – Eat Well class begins at 2:00 p.m., so remember to check the beginning and ending times of the classes you are interested in.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the OLLI Board of Directors and all of the committee members for their leadership and the work they will be doing this year. Remember that all of the committees can always use an additional person. I would also like to thank everyone who will say “yes” when asked to be a class assistant or a first-day greeter. Make sure you check out the list of OLLI members on the inside back cover who are volunteering their time to make OLLI at ISU the premier, volunteer-based organization of lifelong learning experiences. Do you like the way I snuck in the OLLI at ISU vision statement?

I’ll see you soon.

Jerilyn Logue
Program Manager
515-294-3192
jlogue@iastate.edu

Jump to:

1. Tests of Big Bang Cosmology
2. These are a Few of My Favorite Things -- Poems
3. An Introduction to Tai Chi and Qigong - FULL
4. Expanding Your Visual Intelligence - FULL
5. Mitochondrial Eve and Y-Chromosomal Adam – My Ancestors and Yours; or, Why Every Muslim is Donald Trump’s Cousin
6. Introduction to Fiction Writing - FULL
7. Mandarin Chinese
8. Falling in Love with Electric Power Infrastructure
9. What in the World ?!? An Examination of World Events as they Happen - FULL
10. Making the World Safe for Democracy: World War I, Civil Liberties, Civil Rights and the Making of Modern America
11. Learning Mac Computers -- Section A
12. An Introduction to Martial Arts – Tae Kwon Do
13. Wine 101 - FULL
14. Conservation in Story County – Conserving our Natural Resources and Quality of Life
15. The Socialist Journey
16. Learning Mac Computers – Section B
17. & 18. World Religions (includes OLLI Online)
19. & 20. There's no Cheating in Baseball (includes OLLI Online)
21. Eat Healthy -- Eat Well - FULL
22. The Federalist Papers - FULL
23. Big History
24. Revealing Lives on Film: The Movie Biopic
25. Cell Phone Photography Field Trips - FULL
26. dSLR Camera Photography Field Trips
27. U.S. Propaganda in the Great War
28. Herbal Cold Care and Recovery
29. Monteverdi 1567-1643
30. Behind the Scenes: Touring Ames Art Centers
31. Probiotics for Digestive Health
32. All About Local Beers
33. Quilt for a Day -- Sac County
34. Tour to Western Iowa's Loess Hills, Desoto Bend Wildlife Refuge, and the Steamboat Bertrand Museum - FULL
35. Iowans Changing Agriculture
36. Abraham Lincoln Tour in Springfield, Ill.

 

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Download catalog as PDF file

 


# 1 – Tests of Big Bang Cosmology

Monday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 11 – Oct. 2  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

We will explore that the Big Bang Model is supported by a number of important observations: the expansion of the universe, the abundance of light elements; and the cosmic microwave background radiation. These three measurable signatures strongly support the notion that the universe evolved from a dense, nearly featureless hot gas, just as the Big Bang model predicts.

Topics to be covered:

  • The expansion of the universe - Edwin Hubble's 1929 observation that galaxies were generally receding from us provided the first clue that the Big Bang theory might be right.
  • The abundance of the light elements H, He, Li - The Big Bang theory predicts that these light elements should have been fused from protons and neutrons in the first few minutes after the Big Bang.
  • The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation - The early universe should have been very hot. The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat leftover from the Big Bang.

Sam Wormley is a retired associate scientist and principal investigator, CNDE/IPRT/AL at Iowa State University and retired as an adjunct professor of astronomy at Marshalltown Community college after 17 years. He regularly teaches science and technology classes for OLLI at Iowa State.


# 2 – These are a Few of My Favorite Things – Poems

Monday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 11 – Oct. 2  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

This class is a ramble through our favorite poems. You have yours; I have mine. What makes a poem memorable/great? Is it the theme, the imagery, the techniques, or our private association to the poem? We will discuss all of the above in the poems you and I bring to class. All poems are about experience, and we will experience insights from many different poets in many different times.  

Keith Carlson taught English at Ames High School for 33 years. For many of those years he was the English Department coordinator. He has taught poetry to all levels of students, from freshmen to honors English 12. He has sponsored poetry exchanges between seniors and third graders. Students were invited to an evening picnic in the timber at his farm where they read their favorite poems around the campfire.


# 3 – An Introduction to Tai Chi and Qigong - FULL

Monday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Six weeks, Sept. 11 – Oct. 16
Cost: $56.00
North Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

Tai Chi is a physical, mental, and spiritual exercise developed in ancient China that is often referred to as 'Meditation in Motion' and as 'Medication in Motion'. This six-week class will introduce you to Tai Chi using the Tai Chi for Rehabilitation form that can be done lying down, seated, standing, or standing/walking in addition to warmups. We'll also do a bit of Qigong, mostly using the Frolic of the Five Animals—tiger, deer, bear, monkey, and bird. Qigong is a form of gentle exercise composed of movements that are repeated a number of times, often stretching the body, increasing fluid movement, and building awareness of how the body moves through space.

This course is suitable for those who need to sit as well as those who are able to stand and move. For this class, we will be seated and/or standing, and mats are not needed.

Participants should wear loose, comfortable clothing and flat shoes suitable for exercise.

Topics to be covered:

  • During this six-week session we will learn about three of the five major forms of Tai Chi by learning the Tai Chi for Rehabilitation Form which incorporates Sun Style, Yang Style, and Chen Style moves. As we learn these moves, we will learn about the differences among the three styles.
  • We'll also learn about the five elements, seasons, and animals of Chinese culture through use of the Five Element Qigong (with which we'll close each class) and the five Animal Frolics.

Deanna Jens is a retired computer programmer/systems analyst with a BS in math from ISU and has practiced Tai Chi since 2002 with several instructors in the Des Moines Area. Jens is certified in Tai Chi for Arthritis, Tai Chi for Diabetes, Tai Chi for Energy, and Tai Chi for Rehabilitation through Dr. Lams Tai Chi for Health organization based in Australia. She continues to recertify with Tai Chi for Health and also take other workshops to increase the depth of her knowledge.


# 4 – Expanding Your Visual Intelligence - FULL

Monday 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 11 – Oct. 2  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

Our approach will be to look at images of all kinds – ads, artwork, whatever you’d like –with the goal of understanding how we “see” and expanding our ability to see critically. I hope you’ll come to agree that visual literacy is crucial to meet the challenges of our times.  

The human eye evolved to assure the survival of hunter-gatherers. As a result, our eyes are hard-wired to see, for example, patterns (like berries in the undergrowth) and to consider any motion important (something to catch? – something to escape?). The information age creates a much different landscape. Can we help our ancient eyes adapt?

We will draw on insights from recent studies of the brain and apply rhetorical principles to better understand what and how we see – while we’re having a good time looking at pictures together.

James Noland taught introductory and advanced communication courses at Iowa State University for 30 years. Noland was involved in the development of ISUComm, Iowa State’s innovative campus-wide communication program that integrates written, oral, visual, and electronic communication.  


# 5 – Mitochondrial Eve and Y-Chromosomal Adam – My Ancestors and Yours; or, Why Every Muslim is Donald Trump’s Cousin

Monday 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 11 – Oct. 2  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

A remarkably short, easily-understood proof will be given of the fact that every living human being is descended by an all-maternal line from an ancient individual styled “Mitochondrial Eve” and by an all-paternal line from another ancient individual styled “Y-chromosomal Adam,” making everyone, everyone else’s cousin. Detailed information will be provided about these two individuals. We will also discuss the mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups which record our mutations since ME and Y-cA and show how they tell us the migrations over the world of our all-maternal and all-paternal lines.  Many interesting related topics will also be discussed. This course presupposes no previous knowledge of DNA or genetics.

Laurent Hodges is professor emeritus of physics at Iowa State University. Hodges has taught many OLLI courses on such subjects as Charles Darwin; The Origin of Species; An Introduction to Evolution; Human Evolution; The History of the Panama Canal; Mysteries Solved by DNA; Baseball’s Historic Games – The Good, the Bad, and the Just Plain Crazy; Notable Achievements by Unlikely Persons; and The Chicago Cubs: Their First 141 Years.


# 6 – Introduction to Fiction Writing - FULL

Monday 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Four weeks, Oct. 9 – Oct. 30
Cost: $50.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 12

Do you have stories inside you just begging to be told? Have people always told you that you should be a writer? In this introductory class, we’ll explore elements of fiction including voice, characterization, conflict, setting, plot, dialogue, and more. No writing experience necessary!  

Topics to be covered:

  • Voice and character building
  • Setting, plot, and structure
  • Dialogue, pacing, and tying everything together
  • Revision
  • Publishing and next steps

M. Molly Backes is the author of the YA novel The Princesses of Iowa (Candlewick Press), which was named Chicago Public Library’s Best of the Best Fiction for Teens (2013), Forever Young Adult’s Best YA Books of 2012, and was a finalist on NPR.org’s Best-Ever Teen Novels list in 2012. She has performed her personal essays at a number of Chicago reading series, and is a frequent guest at writing conferences and festivals across the country. Backes has lived in Wisconsin, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Mexico, and Illinois. She’s not the kind of person to play favorites or anything, but she might just like Iowa the best.

Brontë Christopher Wieland is the co-editor of the forthcoming anthology Sunvault: Stories of Solarpunk & Eco-Speculation (Upper Rubber Boot Books, August 2017). He is the 2016 recipient of the Dark Horse Award from the ISU Creative Writing program, and his work has been published in Flash Fiction Online & Hypertext Magazine. Wieland has taught English in Spain, worked as an editor at the University of Wisconsin Press and the Dictionary of American Regional English, and is currently an MFA Candidate in Iowa State University’s Creative Writing program.


# 7 – Mandarin Chinese 中文

Tuesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 12 – Oct. 3
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

This class is an opportunity for you to learn the basic concepts of Mandarin Chinese (the language used throughout most of China). If you have ever been curious or interested in what the Chinese characters mean, how to read and write them, and how they are spoken – this class may be for you.

During the basic classes, you will learn to speak common phrases and important words, read and write characters, plus understand basic conversation. The tonal concept of Mandarin will be explained along with an examination of sentence structure and the differences with English. Outlines and handouts will be provided weekly to enhance learning and progress. Each week a specific topic will be presented for enrichment, such as geography, travel, education, or music. Enrichment material will be available as needed.

见你在课堂上  pronounced  “jian ni zai ketang shang,” which means “see you in class.”

Homer Gartz’ career was in the field of music as director of the Ames High School Band and as the director of the Ames Municipal Band. His undergraduate and graduate studies were done at the University of Northern Iowa, Drake University, and the University of Iowa. In retirement, a trip to China led to an interest in studying the Chinese language. Reading and writing Chinese characters, as well as learning pronunciation and being able to communicate, became both a challenge and a goal. Taking Chinese classes and working with private tutors has made this a most interesting endeavor.


# 8 – Falling in Love with Electric Power Infrastructure

Tuesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Four weeks, Oct. 10 – Oct. 31
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

We depend on “the grid,” but we don’t know much about it. This course aims to help in two ways: we will learn to identify (like birdwatching or picking mushrooms) what we’re looking at when we see a substation and equipment on poles, we’ll learn a little about the beauty in these engineering feats, and we’ll learn how the grid works and why this giant machine is so fascinating. We may touch on solar storms and why they are a threat, and finally we’ll discuss what our role as citizens may be in the future of the grid.

Topics to be covered:

  • The fundamental problem of time: generation capacity and customer demand versus electricity generated and consumed (kW versus kWh). Why is this such a problem for the grid? Leading to the time value of production/consumption and the value of demand response, and why both time AND location really matter.
  • Variable resources versus baseload resources, storage (technologies, characteristics and limitations), and the implications of the electrification of transportation.
  • A tour of a distribution system and a substation – what is all that stuff on poles? (possible joint event with City of Ames distribution engineers)
  • What are power engineering research teams thinking about these days? What's really hot?  (microgrids, advances in solar, new rate design, advanced metering, wireless power transmission)
  • What should be citizens’ roles? (distribution markets, local systems, individual solar/battery versus community or utility scale renewables, subsidies/tax credits, rate designs, utility "decoupling")

Anne Kimber is the director of the Electric Power Research Center (EPRC) at ISU. The EPRC builds collaboration on applied research between Iowa State University and the power industry. Prior to joining ISU in 2014 she was the director of Energy Services for the Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities for 10 years. She has a P.E. in mechanical engineering, and Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from ISU.


# 9 – What in the World?!? An Examination of World Events as they Happen - FULL

Tuesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Five weeks, Sept. 12 – Oct. 3, Oct. 31
Cost: $50.00
DMACC Campus, 1125 Hancock Dr., Boone, Room 146

Class limit 40

The course will examine world events as they happen. Jeff Schroeder will prepare lectures and moderate discussions on current global events. Emphasis will be on international topics of interest.

Topics to be covered will be determined by unfolding events!!

Please note—there will only be ONE section of this class during the fall and it will be at the Boone DMACC Campus.

Jeff Schroeder earned his Ph.D. from the University of Oregon in comparative political economy after a career in logistics with Fritz Companies (now a division of UPS) where he established air and ocean freight operations in Korea, North China, and the Russian Far East. Schroeder teaches a range of courses for Des Moines Area Community College, from international business to international studies, while actively consulting on transportation security and global logistics projects. Schroeder is an alumnus of Iowa State, earning a B.S. in history.


# 10 – Making the World Safe for Democracy: World War I, Civil Liberties, Civil Rights and the Making of Modern America

Tuesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Three weeks, Oct.10 – Oct. 24
Cost: $38.00
DMACC Campus, 1125 Hancock Dr., Boone, Room 146

Class limit 40

This course will trace the United States’ entry into World War I and how it led to the creation of our modern-day country. Students will explore the social impact of the war and how it affected the everyday activities of Boone County and Iowa citizens. The course will also explore how federal, state, and local officials used the war effort to restrict the civil liberties of U.S. citizens.  

Charles Irwin has been a history and political science instructor for DMACC since 1995, teaching at both the Boone Campus and the Ames Hunziker Center. He is a native Iowan who grew up on a farm in Sac County. Irwin’s educational background includes a B.A. from Central College in Pella and an M.A. from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Additional graduate course work in political science was completed at Iowa State University. Irwin served as the executive director of the Boone County Historical Society in Boone, Iowa from 1990 to 2012.


# 11 – Learning Mac Computers – Section A

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Eight weeks, Sept. 12 – Oct. 31
Cost: $63.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 25

The goal of this class is for you to better learn your Mac computer and to enjoy safe, secure, and hassle-free computing. We cover all the hardware, software, and applications. There is emphasis on safe practices and syncing with your other Apple devices. Although not required, if you have a MacBook, MacBook Air or MacBook Pro -- bring it to class for a hands-on experience.

Topics to be covered:

  • Navigating the Mac
  • Making life easier
  • Contacts and connections
  • macOS resources
  • Word processing
  • Security and maintenance
  • Backup, storage, and sharing
  • Solving problems

Sam Wormley has degrees in mathematics and electrical engineering and taught as an adjunct professor of astronomy at Marshalltown Community College for 17 years. Wormley regularly teaches OLLI classes on computer security, and Apple computers, and mobile devices.         


# 12 – An Introduction to Martial Arts – Tae Kwon Do

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 26 – Oct. 17
Cost: $44.00
North Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 20

The course is designed to introduce the martial arts of “Tae Kwon Do” to those 50+. Martial arts have a long history in Asia and are practiced around the world for physical/mental strength and self-discipline. Tae Kwon Do became an Olympic medal sport in 2000 and is the only Olympic sport of its kind. The practice of Tae Kwon Do normally requires intensity and speed, but for this class, all physical movements will be softened. This is a good opportunity for those who have always wanted to learn about the martial arts but missed it or are interested in self-defense.

Loose clothing and good physical condition are recommended for the class.

Topics to be covered:

  • Warm ups
  • Basic moves—stance, punch, kicks, blocks
  • Form
  • Sparring
  • Self-defence
  • Meditation

Andrew Hong is a fourth degree black belt and a master instructor of martial arts of “Tae Kwon Do.” He has owned and run martial arts studios for students of all ages.


# 13 – Wine 101 - FULL

Tuesday 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
Two weeks, Oct. 17 – Oct. 24
Cost: $35.00 – includes supplies for class
West Hy-Vee, 3800 Lincoln Way, Ames

Class limit 25

Have you wondered what the difference is between all the wines you see in the store? Do you really need to drink white wine with fish and chicken and red wine with beef? Would this wine be better with cheese or chocolate?  What is all that stuff on the label? Does it matter where the wine is from?  What kind of grapes are used to make wine? This class will answer these questions and more. And, of course, you will have an opportunity to taste different white and red wines.

The cost of the class includes wine and light snacks.

Topics to be covered:

  • White wines will be tasted the first session
  • Red wines will be tasted the second session
  • Reading labels
  • Tasting wine
  • Serving wine

Kathy Abbott is the wine and beer department manager at the West Ames Hy-Vee Wine and Spirits and has extensive experience with a wide variety of wines. She is a certified wine specialist.     


# 14 – Conservation in Story County – Conserving our Natural Resources and Quality of Life

Wednesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 13 – Oct. 4
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class Limit 32

Conservation in Iowa is achieved in a very special and clearly unique way. Each county identifies and conducts its own park, recreation, natural resource management, and education operations. This puts conservation definition and involvement at the local level. This course will explore how this is accomplished in Story County, including past and current initiatives, and how people can be involved.  

Topics to be covered:

  • Story County Conservation – an overview. (Michael Cox)
  • Natural Resource Conservation – available tools, current and future issues. (Amy Yoakum and Joe McGovern)
  • Social Awareness and Engagement in Conservation – “Where do I fit in?” (Jerry Keys and Jim Pease)
  • Tedesco Environmental Learning Corridor – a case study in social, environmental, and economic prosperity. (Ted Tedesco, Jim Pease, and Michael Cox)

Michael Cox is the director of Story County Conservation. He earned a fisheries and wildlife biology degree from Iowa State University in 1992 and has worked in non-profit and government sectors for 25 years. He has spent his career working on conservation management, recreation, and environmental awareness. He spent many years in Vermont and most recently in Alaska, where he was the director of parks and recreation for the Fairbanks North Star Borough. In 2011, he returned to Iowa and became the director of Story County Conservation. Cox has always had a love for the outdoors and a deep concern for our water quality.

Amy Yoakum has been employed by Story County Conservation for 18 years. As the natural resource specialist, her duties include creation of management plans for SCC areas (3,000+ acres), implementation of the land stewardship internship program, species inventories, outreach with private landowners, grant writing and administration, prescribed management burns, oversight of all natural resource management practices, and invasive species control.

Joe McGovern is beginning his fifth year as president of the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation. He is both proud and humbled to work with the dynamic board, staff and volunteers of this statewide, nonprofit conservation organization that works passionately to protect and restore Iowa’s land, water, and wildlife. Prior to this leadership, McGovern was devoted to natural land management and restoration – serving five years with Story County Conservation, then 14 years as Land Stewardship Director for Iowa Natural Heritage. He’s a proud graduate of Iowa State University in fisheries and wildlife biology.

Jerry Keys is the environmental education coordinator for Story County Conservation.  He has a B.S. from Iowa State University in animal ecology and is an innovative program developer with more than 26 years of experience designing and conducting experiential programs to challenge mind-sets and move people to action. Keys has experience in outdoor/experiential education, hunter education, environmental education, community relations, administration, and grant management. He has been recognized for his ability to persuasively present ideas, concepts, and targeted actions as both a speaker, team educator and trainer, and curriculum designer.

Jim Pease has over four decades of experience as a front-line interpreter, professor of interpretation, and writer and consultant on many interpretive and environmental education projects. He is now retired, has emeritus status in the Natural Resource Ecology and Management Department at Iowa State University and is active speaking, writing, consulting, and leading international wildlife trips.

Ted Tedesco was the president of Knapp Tedesco Insurance Agency and retired in 2005. He has been involved in Ames city politics and retired in 2006 as the mayor of Ames after serving eight years. Tedesco has been serving on the Story County Conservation Board for nine years.


# 15 – The Socialist Journey

Wednesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Five weeks, Sept. 13 – Oct. 11
Cost: $50.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

The campaign of Bernie Sanders has rekindled an interest in socialism—a much maligned ideology in the U.S. The 19th century is filled to overflowing with strikes and movements dedicated to challenging industrialization—a life-changing dominant force with which working people and the poor had to contend. There were many political philosophers and journalists seeking to upend the old agricultural order and forcibly redefine the relationship of workers to production.

Of course, the dominant characters in this long-running drama were Karl Marx and his alter-ego, Friedrich Engels. There were, however, other significant players, including Rosa Luxemburg.

This course concentrates on the 19th century, the formative years, in France, Germany, Great Britain, and even Italy. This is not a venture into communism, the model installed by Lenin after the Russian Revolution. Later there are other variants, including Mao’s version in China well as others.  Rather this is an attempt to explain the revisionist model, which even now operates in Western Europe in the aforementioned countries. The strongest socialist party, the Socialistische Partei Deutschland, the SPD, flourished before the Great War, which divided socialist adherents into nationalistic factions. Parties however were reconstituted and functioned after the Nazi period.  

The voices in this movement were café denizens who devoted their lives to redefining how society functioned. Some were from wealthy families, some were Jewish, but all devoted their lives to this task. Some died peaceably, some were murdered, including Red Rosa, and others awaited their fate in the Holocaust. There is today the Socialist Party of France, the Labor Party of Great Britain, and the SPD in Germany, among others.  

This begins as a journey through the 19th century, but goes into the divisiveness of the Great War and the subsequent nationalistic forces, which plagued Europe tragically, and finally concludes with present events, people, and parties.  

Much lively discussion is expected and open-mindedness appreciated.  

Katherine Fromm has a Ph.D. in history and has taught history at Iowa State University and other institutions. She has taught a course in 20th century Europe.


# 16 – Learning Mac Computers – Section B

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Eight weeks, Sept. 13 – Nov. 1
Cost: $63.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 25

The goal of this class is for you to better learn your Mac computer and to enjoy safe, secure, and hassle-free computing. We cover all the hardware, software, and applications. There is emphasis on safe practices and syncing with your other Apple devices. Although not required, if you have a MacBook, MacBook Air or MacBook Pro -- bring it to class for a hands-on experience.

Topics to be covered:

  • Navigating the Mac
  • Making life easier
  • Contacts and connections
  • macOS resources
  • Word processing
  • Security and maintenance
  • Backup, storage, and sharing
  • Solving problems

Sam Wormley has degrees in mathematics and electrical engineering and taught as an adjunct professor of astronomy at Marshalltown Community College for 17 years. Wormley regularly teaches OLLI classes on computer security, and Apple computers, and mobile devices.       


# 17 – World Religions

# 18 – World Religions OLLI ONLINE

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Eight weeks, Sept. 13 – Nov. 1
Cost: $63.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

The goal of this course is to get acquainted with the frameworks of the major religions of the world. The first week will be an introduction to the dimensions of world religions. This will consider the elements that are common to all religions. Subsequent weeks will cover Judaism, Hinduism, Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, Jainism and Sikhism, respectively. The last session will be a class with open discussion on all the religions in which everyone can participate.

Topics to be covered:

  • The origin and founder
  • The vision of the divine
  • The sacred books
  • The festivals
  • The eschatology

John Cunnally teaches art history in the College of Design at Iowa State University. Although his specialty is the Italian Renaissance and modern visual culture, he has a strong interest in the art and architecture of the Muslim world, and teaches a course titled “Art of Islam.”

V. V. Raman is emeritus professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is a philosopher-physicist who has authored 14 books and many articles on a variety of subjects. He is an elected Senior Metanexus Fellow (Philadelphia), Academic Fellow and past president of the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science, an elected member of the International Society for Science and Religion (Cambridge, UK), and a Raja Rao Awardee of the Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi).  


# 19 – There's No Cheating in Baseball! A Survey of Getting Away with as Much as You Can in the National Pastime

# 20 – There's No Cheating in Baseball! A Survey of Getting Away with as Much as You Can in the National Pastime OLLI ONLINE

Wednesday 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 13 – Oct. 4
Cost: $44.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

Topics to be covered:

  • Honest cheating: I saw my opportunities and I took 'em
  • The art or crime of sign stealing
  • More than I expectorated
  • Could Charles Atlas have beat the Babe even though he wasn't a 98 lb. weakling?

Honest cheating: I saw my opportunities and I took 'em
What's the difference between cheating and "sharp" play? Rules and constitutions: authorizations or prohibitions? Why is there an infield fly rule? John McGraw and the original Baltimore Orioles. Merkle's boner or ball, ball, give me a ball. Shoeless Joe and cheating to lose?

The art or crime of sign stealing
"The Giants win the pennant!" The Giants win the pennant? Did Bobby Thomson know what was coming? What did Rapid Robert bring back from the war? Daisies won't tell, but what about pitchers? Why do middle infielders keep putting their gloves over their face? Was the Boudreau shift legal? Fair? What would Wee Willie Keeler have done about computer positioning? Would Connie Mack still need a scorecard?

More than I expectorated
Doctoring the baseball to make it worse? How disgusting is spit when laced with tobacco juice? Get those souvenir fouls back in play? How do you juice a bat? What can you put on the handle? Mittens, gloves, bushel baskets or to err is human. Tilted foul lines, the ivy at Wrigley, and Greenberg Gardens: there ain't no neutral fields.

Could Charles Atlas have beat the Babe even though he wasn't a 98 lb. weakling?
Doctoring the players to make them better? Why did the Cubs get rid of Rafael Palmeiro? May sinners join the saints in the Hall? If it ain't illegal, you can do it? Did Leo really know where nice guys finish? Why did Rapid Robert think that Jackie wouldn't make it? What did Tony La Russa think a winter in the gym could achieve?

Jorgen Rasmussen was at Wrigley Field to see Andy Pafko hit his first home run there, a walk-off shot that gave the Cubs a 2-0 win over the Brooklyn Dodgers in June 1944. In high school he was the official scorekeeper cum statistician for his home town La Porte Cubs, champions of the Northern Indiana Baseball League. He umpired for a local junior baseball league. Contrary to his firm expectation, he did live to see the Chicago Cubs win the World Series (although not in person).    


# 21 – Eat Healthy – Eat Well - FULL

Wednesday 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. (Please note the start and end time)
Four weeks, Sept. 13 – Oct. 4
Cost: $54.00 – includes supplies for class
Cooks’ Emporium, 313 Main St., Ames

Class limit 20

Marg Junkhan will demonstrate easy to prepare meals for one or two people. Students will get to taste each food prepared. Techniques for coping with problems of preparing smaller amounts, for example, preparing food in advance, and others, will be taught. Recipes for each dish will be included. Join Junkhan for these fun and informative sessions in the cozy kitchen atmosphere of Cooks’ Emporium.

Marg Junkhan is a graduate of Iowa State in Home Economics. She taught cooking classes in the Adult Education Program at Ames High School and for Prime Time Alive through Mary Greeley Hospital. She is the owner of Cooks’ Emporium.


# 22 – The Federalist Papers - FULL

Wednesday 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
One day, Sept. 13  
Cost: $16.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

This presentation focuses on the classic arguments for the adoption of the Constitution made by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay in The Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers were a collection of 85 essays published in various New York newspapers designed to convince the delegates in the New York Ratifying Convention to adopt the Constitution, and subsequently have served as the most significant interpretation of the Constitution in American political history. A recommended reading list and handout will be provided, and there will be a question and answer session after the lecture.

Bennett Smith is an instructor in history and political science at North Iowa Area Community College. He is also an instructor in various lifelong learning programs including the NIACC Lifelong Learning Institute, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Iowa State University, and the LIFE program at Rochester Community and Technical College in Rochester, Minn. He holds a BS in speech communication and an MA in history from Iowa State University. He has also done graduate work at the University of Iowa in Social Foundations of Education.


# ¬23 – Big History

Wednesday 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 20 – Oct. 11
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

Big History examines our past, explains our present, and imagines our future. It's a story about us, an idea that arose from a desire to go beyond specialized and self-contained fields of study to grasp history as a whole. This growing, multi-disciplinary approach is focused on high school students, yet designed for anyone seeking answers to the big questions about the history of our universe. The Big History Project is a joint effort between teachers, scholars, scientists, and their supporters to bring a multi-disciplinary approach to knowledge to lifelong learners around the world.

Please note this is the same class that was offered during the Winter 2017 session.

Topics to be covered:

  • The universe, our solar system and earth, the Big Bang, stars light up, new chemical elements, earth and the solar system
  • Life, life on earth, how life evolves, adapts and thrives
  • Humans, collective learning – how humans are different, agriculture – how farming sows the seeds of civilization
  • The future, the modern revolution, where do we go from here?

Tim Gaul is a native Iowan and a graduate of UNI with a degree in chemistry and physics. He has worked his entire professional career in industry as a chemist, engineer, operations manager, and lean manufacturing consultant. He was employed by Union Carbide in Red Oak, Iowa, 22 years with Hach Company in Ames, and currently with Ag Leader Technology in Ames. At a very young age, Gaul was fascinated with gazing into the night sky in rural Iowa, contemplating the big questions such as “What is out there?”  “Where did we come from?”  and “Why are we here?” His passion in this quest is fueled by wonder and awe with each new scientific discovery.


# 24 – Revealing Lives on Film: The Movie Biopic

Wednesday 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 13 – Oct. 4
Cost: $44.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

In his latest OLLI course,Tom Beell explores one of the most popular yet overlooked motion picture genres: the movie biography. In the past century more than 5,000 “biopics” have been made, profiling the lives of saints and sinners, kings and commoners, geniuses and clowns. Clips from some of the most significant film biographies will be shown. Handouts, suggested readings, and just-for-fun quizzes with prizes will be included.

Thomas Beell’s connection to motion pictures began at 16, when he managed a neighborhood movie theater in his hometown of Tacoma, Wash. After joining the faculty of the Greenlee School of Journalism at Iowa State University in 1975, Beell taught film courses while reviewing movies for the Ames Tribune for 20 years; he later co-hosted a movie show on WOI radio for 15 years. He currently presents a weekly movie music show on KHOI, the community radio station in Ames. After 38 years of service at ISU, Beell retired in May 2013 and is now professor emeritus.


# 25 – Cell Phone Photography Field Trips - FULL

Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 14 – Oct. 12 (No class Sept. 28)
Cost: $50.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

Cell phone cameras cannot hope to compete with dSLR cameras with interchangeable lenses, zoom, and aperture control, yet cell phone cameras are being used to create outstanding images by the likes of National Geographic photographers. This course concentrates on how to deal with the limitations and take advantage of the strengths to help you be a better cell phone photographer. We will also explore visualization, perspective, composition, color balance, and light quality.

We will spend our first hour and a half reviewing each other’s images and course materials, followed by shooting photographs as a group at nearby city and county parks.

Topics to be covered:

  • Review of basics
  • Controlling the cell phone camera
  • Improving your images
  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Post-image processing
  • Shooting video

Sam Wormley is a well-known local photographer who regularly contributes photographic services to the Central Iowa Symphony, Ames Town & Gown Chamber Music Association, CoMotion Dance Theater, and photojournalism students at Iowa State.          


# 26 – dSLR Camera Photography Field Trips

Thursday 9:00 a.m – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Oct. 19 – Nov. 9
Cost: $50.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

dSLR cameras with interchangeable lenses, zoom, and aperture control (and point and shoot cameras) offer photographers great control. This course concentrates on visualization and how to use your camera to help you be a better photographer. We will explore visualization, perspective, composition, color balance, and light quality. It is said that amateur photographers worry about having good enough equipment, professional photographers worry about satisfying their editors and making money, and master photographers worry about the light.

We spend out first hour and a half reviewing each other’s images and course materials, followed by shooting photographs as a group at nearby city and county parks.

Topics to be covered:

  • Review of photography basics
  • Controlling the dSLR or point and shoot camera
  • Improving your images
  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Post-image processing, printing, backup, and storage

Sam Wormley is a well-known local photographer who regularly contributes photographic services to the Central Iowa Symphony, Ames Town & Gown Chamber Music Association, CoMotion Dance Theater, and photojournalism students at Iowa State University.


# 27 – U.S. Propaganda in the Great War

Thursday 11:00 a.m – 12:30 p.m.
Two weeks, Sept. 14 – 21  
Cost: $32.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

The most far-reaching changes brought about by the war would be at home rather than abroad. In the course of mobilizing to fight its first war abroad, the U.S. government became larger and more centralized. One of President Wilson's first steps after asking Congress for a Declaration of War was to create an independent agency to influence a divided American public in support of U.S. participation in a foreign war.

The Committee on Public Information was the first large-scale use of propaganda by the U.S. government. The CPI (also known as the Creel Committee, after its head, Robert Creel) initiated a campaign borrowing all the techniques employed by the British and the Germans and drawing on all the resources that the emerging industries of mass advertising and mass entertainment could provide. In the era of the first total war, Creel developed the first total propaganda machine.

Topics to be covered:

  • Propaganda 101: An introduction
  • America's propaganda machine: The Committee for Public Information (CPI)
  • Propaganda in various media
  • Unpacking propaganda: a practice session in analyzing U.S. war posters

Ron Palumbo is a retired teacher and social worker. One of his interests is social and political history. He has presented several OLLI courses on World War I in recent years.   


# 28 – Herbal Cold Care and Recovery

Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
One day, Oct. 19
Cost: $32.00 – includes supplies for class
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

Discover the ways herbs and whole foods can support your body during and after a cold hits. Local herbalist Kristin M. Roach will show you how to prepare traditional cold care teas and vinegars, teach you about a variety of herbs to support your body, and send you home with your own spicy cold care cider and a sample of cold care recovery tea.

Topics to be covered:

  • Participants will help make a batch of herbal vinegar and take a bit of it home
  • We will view a demo of making a decoction and herbal infusion
  • We will discuss 6+ herbs to support the body before, during, and after a cold
  • Participants will take home a cold care tea sample and herbal vinegar

Kristin M. Roach is the co-owner and herbalist at Little Woods: Herbs and Teas. Roach holds a certificate in herbal studies from the Herbal Academy of New England and has completed a yearlong apprenticeship with an American Herbalist Guild certified herbalist. Her lifelong passion for herbalism led to the opening of Little Woods with her husband in 2016.


# 29 – Monteverdi 1567 – 1643

Thursday 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
One day, Sept. 21
Cost: $16.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

This year marks the 450th anniversary of the birth of the Italian composer Claudio Monteverdi. In honor of this anniversary, this one-session class on Monteverdi is being offered.

Monteverdi was writing music at a time when the Renaissance period was beginning to transition into the Baroque. His music therefore shows aspects of both periods, sometimes even within one work! It also occasionally has elements which are strictly Monteverdi. Whatever the period, Monteverdi’s music connects with the listener in a way that is timeless, and it well deserves the revival it has been given in the last few decades. We will explore some of this glorious music and discover why Monteverdi is considered to be one of the great composers in the history of music.

Jean Meek grew up in a musical family and became interested in classical music at an early age. She has taught several previous music classes for both the College for Seniors and OLLI and made presentations for a number of local musical organizations. Meek studied voice for several years and has sung in local choirs.  


# 30 – Behind the Scenes: Touring Ames Art Centers

Thursday 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Four weeks, Sept. 14 – Oct. 5
Cost: $44.00
Meet at various locations each week – See information below where to meet

Class limit 25

There are three institutions in Ames whose mission includes providing opportunities for making art: The Octagon Center for the Arts, the Workspace, and Creative Artists’ Studios of Ames. Each offers a unique chance to learn, to develop skills, or to work in your chosen media. We will tour these and meet the people behind them, have a chance to ask questions, and see what goes on in each space, including demonstrations by experts. There will also be tours of associated exhibit space. In the final course meeting we will discuss what we saw, learn about other opportunities in the area, and give you a chance to make suggestions that will be given to the organizations.

We will meet at the ISU Alumni Center on the lower level to receive maps and carpool if desired the first week. Information will be given each week about the next week’s location and parking.

Topics to be covered:

  • Tour the Octagon, including current exhibit, and meet key staff members—director, exhibits director, education director
  • Tour CASA, meet the artists, and see a demonstration of throwing on the pottery wheel
  • Tour the Workspace, see a demonstration of working with glass, meet the art director, and visit the galleries in the Memorial Union
  • Meet to discuss these experiences, provide feedback to the art centers, and review other opportunities to be involved in visual arts in the area.

Rhonda Scott is a practicing artist and instructor at the Workspace as well as a former director of the Ames Community Arts Council.

Lee Anne Willson is a founding member of Creative Artists’ Studios of Ames and current president of the Board of Trustees for the Octagon as well as a practicing artist.


# 31 – Probiotics for Digestive Health

Thursday 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
One day, Sept. 21
Cost: $24.00 – includes supplies for class
Wheatsfield Cooperative, 413 Northwestern Ave., Ames

Class limit 25

Join Kim McDermott, Wheatsfield’s wellness manager, to learn about probiotics and their role in maintaining digestive health and immune support. We will focus on the role of probiotics in both supplement form and those naturally occurring in foods. Since many cultures have relied on fermented foods over the centuries, we will sample some foods and beverages including tempeh, Kombucha, and Kim Chi. We will also discuss the Kombucha brewing process, examining a SCOBY, which is the active medium in the Kombucha fermentation process.

Kim McDermott holds a B.S. degree in nutritional science and has been interested in natural foods and vegetarian cooking for the past 25 years. She enjoys experimenting in the kitchen to create down-to-earth, healthy recipes. McDermott is the wellness manager at Wheatsfield. She previously co-managed a small vegetarian restaurant, and also taught vegetarian cooking classes for the first CSA in central Iowa, the Magic Beanstalk.


# 32 – All About Local Beers

Thursday 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
One day, Sept. 21
Cost: $26.00 – includes supplies for class
Wheatsfield Cooperative, 413 Northwestern Ave., Ames

Class limit 25

Explore a variety of local beers with Bronwyn Beatty-Hansen, beer and wine buyer at Wheatsfield. As breweries pop up across the state there are more choices and styles of beer on the market all the time. There will be some local cheeses served as well. Find out about different hops, yeasts, and flavor enhancements, and discover for yourself why we don’t need to travel too far to find a vast array of delicious brews.

Bronwyn Beatty-Hansen is a native of Emmetsburg, Iowa. She moved to Ames to study political science at Iowa State University and is now happy to call Ames home. Bronwyn is the operations and human resources manager at the Wheatsfield Cooperative, as well as the wine and beer buyer.


Learning on the Road


# 33 – Quilt for a Day – Sac County

Coordinator: Jim Patton
Friday, Sept. 8, 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $70.00
Minimum for the trip: 20; Maximum for the trip: 50
Registration Deadline: End of day on Monday, Aug. 21 to guarantee a space

The all-day bus tour of Sac County Barn Quilts will be conducted by Sue Peyton. The locations will be a sample of almost 60 Sac County barn quilts and beautiful farmsteads. Historic barns and corncribs feature colorful quilt blocks with ties to rural life. Additional historical attractions will include the “World’s Largest Popcorn Ball” and an early 20th Century Chautauqua building.
The noon-hour stop will be a special feature, The Prairie Pedlar, north of Odebolt, Iowa, with seven acres including over 30 glorious gardens, a restored barn and other buildings, over 240 varieties of annuals and 175+ varieties of perennials.

Schedule for the day:

  • 8:00 am: Leave the Alumni Center
  • 9:30 am: Pick up Sue Peyton and began in the SE corner of Sac Co.
  • 12:30 pm: Prairie Pedlar for a tour and box lunch
  • 2:30 pm: Travel to Sac City
  • 3:00 pm: Visit the “World’s Largest Popcorn Ball” and the Chautauqua building
  • 4:00 pm: Barn Quilt Tour at Peyton’s
  • 5:00 pm: Depart for Ames
  • 6:30 pm: Arrive at the Alumni Center

Transportation, tip for the driver, bottled water, lunch, and all entrance fees are included in the cost of the trip.


# 34 – Tour to Western Iowa’s Loess Hills, Desoto Bend Wildlife Refuge, and the Steamboat Bertrand Museum - FULL

Coordinator: Louis Banitt
Friday, Oct. 6, 6:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
One day, $100.00
Minimum for the trip: 20; Maximum for the trip: 50
Registration Deadline: End of the day on Monday, Sept. 18 to guarantee a space

Join us for a full day of adventure. The DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge is 8,362 acres with 46% in Iowa and 54% in Nebraska. It is the home to 30 mammal species and many bird species and is a major stopover on the Central Flyway bird migration route. The Loess Hills State Forest (LHSF) is located in west-central Iowa in Harrison and Monona Counties and is comprised of 11,600 acres. An overlook, constructed in 1997 with REAP monies, provides visitors with a spectacular view of the forest, prairies, the Missouri River Bottomlands, and Nebraska. The Steamboat Bertrand hit a submerged log 30 miles north of Omaha, Neb. on April 1, 1865. By 1969, the cargo was excavated, and the museum houses 250,000 artifacts.

A local tour guide will be on the motor coach with us for the day and taking us to the following sites:

  • DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center
  • Steamboat Bertrand Museum
  • Missouri Meander Trail: this is a 900 ft. accessible paved trail near the Visitor Center
  • Wildlife Drive
  • Lunch at the Christian Church in Pisgah, IA (ham balls, cheesy potatoes, vegetable, salad, roll, dessert, and drink)
  • Loess Hills State Forest Office and Visitor Center
  • Scenic Overlook
  • Loess Hills Lavender Farm, if time allows
  • A short hike, if time allows

We will leave the ISU Alumni Center at 6:30 a.m. and should be back by 6:00 p.m. A planned restroom break will be taken about half-way through the drive both directions. Transportation, tip for the driver, bottled water, light snacks, lunch, and all entrance fees are included in the cost of the trip. The only extra money needed will be for visitor center/gift shop purchases.


# 35 – Iowans Changing Agriculture

Coordinator: Jim Patton
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Cost:  $65.00
Minimum for the trip: 20; Maximum for the trip: 50
Registration Deadline: End of day on Monday, Oct. 16 to guarantee a space

A newly completed swine confinement building with state-of-the-art technology in feeding and caring for growing/finishing swine. Learn about the manure handling, feed systems, health management and daily operating procedures. Iowa continues to be the world leader in pork production with over 50 million pigs marketed in 2016.

Hagie Manufacturing was founded by an Iowa State College graduate – a problem-solver from Clarion, Iowa. He developed a sell-propelled “personnel mover” to modernize detasseling corn and it evolved into a crop sprayer. This company is truly and “Iowa Success Story” and is a major industry leader.

Murray McMurray founder of the Murray McMurray Hatchery, sold baby chicks from the bank where he worked in 1917. The closing of banks during the depression prompted him to develop a mail-order baby chick business. The business evolved reflecting the limited use of the railroads and the increased use of the U.S. postal service. Today 99% of the business is done through catalog orders to small farms and hobbyist. A new state-of-the art 26,000 sq. ft. hatchery was built in 1991.

Van Diest Supply Company was founded by Bob and Mary Van Diest selling fertilizer to their neighbors in the mid ‘50s. During their first year, their profit was $32. The business grew and they diversified into farm chemicals. The business continues to be family owned and now includes product development, process development, formulation, liquid bulk storage, and distribution. The state-of-the-art equipment and facilities located in Webster City are the hub of 16 outlying distribution centers serving 18 mid-American states.

Schedule for the day:

  • 8:00 am: Leave the Alumni Center
  • 9:00 am: New swine facilities
  • 10:30 am: Hagie Manufacturing in Clarion
  • Noon: Lunch at Hagie Manufacturing—included in registration fees
  • 2:00 pm: Murray McMurray Hatchery
  • 3:30 pm: Van Diest Supply Company
  • 5:30 pm: Depart for Ames
  • 6:00 pm: Arrive at the Alumni Center

#36 – Abraham Lincoln Tour in Springfield, Ill.

Coordinator: Bennett Smith
July 23 – 27, 2018
An estimated cost for this trip is $750 for a single and $580 each for a double.
Minimum for this trip is 20.
Please indicate your interest on the registration form.

Join Bennett Smith for a five-day trip to Springfield, Ill. via a stop in Galesburg, Ill. A similar trip was last offered in the fall of 2014. This trip features an additional travel day with an overnight in Galesburg and extended exploration of the Underground Railroad. Currently we are asking you to indicate your interest and save a space on your calendar for next summer.

In Galesburg, (home of the first anti-slavery society in Illinois, a stop on the Underground Railroad, and the site of the fifth Lincoln-Douglas debate at Knox College) we will go to the Galesburg Colony Underground Railroad Freedom Station, visit Old Main, and have a presentation by staff of the Freedom Station. In Springfield the following sites will be included: Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, the Old State Capitol, Korean War Museum, Lincoln’s Tomb and War Memorials, Lincoln Home National Historic site, and Lincoln’s New Salem State Historic Site. Additional sites may include the Lincoln Depot, Washington Park Botanical Gardens, and/or Camp Butler National Cemetery.

The cost of this trip will include transportation, tip for the driver, hotel accommodations, breakfast, all admissions into sites, water and snacks on the bus, and a box meal on the trip home. This does not include your additional lunches and evening meals or the cost for the Ghost Walk (optional tour).


Course Locations

ISU Alumni Center
420 Beach Avenue
Ames, Iowa, 50011-1430

Parking is available in the ISU Center parking lot, section A2. Handicap parking is available on both the east (commuter lots) and west (Beach Ave.) sides of the Alumni Center.

DMACC Boone Campus
Room 146
1125 Hancock Dr.
Boone, IA 50036

Hy-Vee West Ames
3800 Lincoln Way
Ames, IA  50014

Wheatsfield Cooperative
413 Northwestern Ave.
Ames, IA  50010

Cooks’ Emporium
313 Main St.
Ames, IA  50010

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