Iowa State University Alumni Association
 

Spring 2017 Course Catalog

Dear Colleagues:

Do you have the Spring 2017 open house marked on your calendar? If not, be sure to add Thursday, Feb. 16 from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. because that will be your first opportunity to register for several interesting classes and trips. The curriculum committee continues to put together lifelong learning opportunities — with your assistance, thanks to your suggestions on the class evaluation forms.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the OLLI Board of Directors and all of the committee members for their leadership this year. It has been a year filled with change and growth. We received a $25,000 capacity-building grant from the Osher Foundation, which has helped us to do more advertising. This includes ads on the side of a Cy-Ride bus, sponsorship on Iowa Public Radio, sponsored coffees at retirement communities, registration fees for senior expo events, production of YouTube videos, and purchasing SWAG items. If you don’t know what SWAG is, don’t feel bad because I didn’t either. I’ve been told it stands for Something We All Get.

The grant is also allowing us to have an event at the end of the fiscal year to celebrate a successful year, the OLLI members, and the volunteers for their time and talents. I hope you will join us on Tuesday, May 16 for lunch. More information will be available at a later date.

Jerilyn Logue
Program Manager
515-294-3192
jlogue@iastate.edu

Jump to:

1. Maximize your iPhone Usage and Enjoyment -- FULL
2. Home Remedies
3. What's New at the ISU Research Park
4. Listening to Music Beyond the Sound
5. Great Decisions 2017
6. Ames Business and School Visits
7. Learning your iPad, Section A
8. The Science and Art of Fishing
9. Norman Rockwell: More than The Saturday Evening Post Covers
10. Creative Nonfiction: Writing about People, Places, Events -- FULL
11. ISU Volleyball: Below the Surface
12. Preserving Family Memories: Photo Preservation and Digitization
13. & 14. Yellowstone Supervolcano
15. & 16. Illegals: Russian Spies Next Door Posing as Your American Neighbors
17. Medical Tips for Retirees
18. Learning your iPad, Section B
19. Over There: The Great War and the Transformation of American Society
20. Globalization: Understanding the World We Live In
21. Watercolor: A Look at the Medium in Action
22. Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt
23. An Introduction to Humanism
24. Cell Phone Camera Photography Field Trips
25. dSLR Camera Photography Field Trips
26. Select Constutitional Questions -- FULL
27. The Chicago Cubs: Their First 141 Years
28. What in the World?!? -- FULL
29. Surveying for Civilians
30. Introduction to Kayaking Workshop
31. Learning on the Road: Bioprocessing in Eddyville, Iowa
32. Learning on the Road: Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Libraries and Museums

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1. Maximize your iPhone Usage and Enjoyment -- FULL

Monday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Four weeks, March 20 – April 10  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

This interactive course will cover the fundamentals of iOS through four broad areas. The aim of the course will be to provide you with a practical methodology to better understand and use one of the most versatile tools ever created.

Topics to be covered:

  • Communication
  • Productivity
  • Security
  • Exploration

Andrew Peters founded Wondermint (an Apple support and training company) in 2012 with the idea that everyone can use technology to enhance their lives. With an accessible and laid-back training style, as well as an extreme awareness of the "side effects" of technology, he strives to inspire a sense of balance in his clients' lives.


2. Home Remedies

Monday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
One day, April 17
Cost: $16.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

During the Great Depression and for many years following it, people did not frequent a doctor as much as we do today. Most towns did not have a local doctor, and many farm families would not have had the luxury of seeing a doctor. Even if there was a doctor he would be miles away, requiring a trip. This presentation references Little Heathens - Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression by Mildred Armstrong Kalish. In it the author describes home remedies she knew growing up on an Iowa farm. Audiences find it fun to explore their own home remedies and learn where they originated. Although not a requirement, audience members are encouraged to read Little Heathens prior to the event.

Phyllis Schrag is a retired high school teacher of English, speech, and theatre. In 2015 she and her husband Larry moved to Ames from South Dakota where she remains a South Dakota Humanities Scholar, speaking there on a variety of topics. She is an avid reader, prolific quilter, experienced actor/singer, and a sought-after public speaker.


3. What's New at the ISU Research Park

Coordinator: Louis Banitt
Monday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Four weeks, April 17 – May 8
Cost: $44.00
Conference Room, ISU Research Park

Class limit 32

This class will feature presentations by small startup occupants of the ISU Research Park as well as Vermeer, Workiva and Boehringer Ingelheim.  

Topics to be covered:

  • Organization and business plan of the ISU Research Park
  • Cultivation Corridor implications and opportunities
  • How entrepreneurship is fostered in the research park

Vermeer – Its location in the research park provides future opportunities for partnerships with ISU in securing potential grants or research project funding, as well as better accommodating Vermeer employees living in the Ames area.

Workiva - The company is headquartered in Ames, Iowa and employ more than 950 people with offices in 15 cities. Workiva created Wdesk, a cloud-based productivity platform for enterprises to collect, link, report, and analyze business data with control and accountability. Thousands of organizations, including over 65% of the Fortune 500, use Wdesk for risk, compliance or management reporting.

Boehringer Ingelheim - Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc., (BIVI) is the fifth-largest animal health company in the U.S. and produces innovative vaccine and pharmaceutical products for the prevention and treatment of diseases in the swine, cattle, equine, and companion animal markets.


4. Listening to Music Beyond the Sound

Monday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Eight weeks, March 20 – May 8  
Cost: $63.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 30

How do you listen to music, and why do you like or dislike a particular piece or genre?  The goals of this class are to improve appreciation and understanding of music through guided listening and provide a challenge for listeners at every level of experience.  Class procedure will involve listening to a wide variety of music including classical works by Mozart, Brahms, Wagner, Shostakovich, Copland, Dvorak, and Holst to jazz selections by Stan Kenton, Maynard Ferguson, Miles Davis, and John Coltrane to name a few. Other genre will be presented such as rock, pop, country, and new age, plus more.  Explanations, thoughts, and ideas about music will direct the listening and help focus on the essential parts of the selection. Your own preferences, analysis, and evaluation will be explored and examined with opportunities for response, reaction, and discussion. A series of handouts will allow you to react to each of the recordings presented.

After the eight classes you will have listened to 35 selections from CD’s, examined the 10 elements of music as defined for this class, and been exposed to 13 genre of music as recognized by the Ames Public Library. Assignments for listening enrichment will be available each week.

Someone once said, “Music is what feelings sound like.”

Topics to be covered:

  • Basic listening for:
    • Overall sound
    • Mood and emotion
    • Instrumentation and orchestration
  • Beyond study helps you focus on:
    • Melody
    • Rhythm
    • Harmony
    • Tempo
    • Dynamics
    • Form
    • Style

Homer Gartz was director of the Ames Public Schools Band (41 years) and Ames Municipal Band (26 years). His undergraduate and graduate studies, with an emphasis on education and performance (trombone and piano) were done at the University of Northern Iowa, Drake, and the University of Iowa. He has musical experience as an educator, conductor, performer, and adjudicator at local, state, and national levels.


5. Great Decisions 2017

Monday 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Eight weeks, March 20 –  May 11
Cost: $63.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 25

Great Decisions is a foreign policy discussion group that studies one topic each week for eight weeks.  The Foreign Policy Association prepares about 10 pages of reading material and a 25-minute video for each topic as a factual base for the discussion.  A study guide is available for $25 from the Foreign Policy Association (http://www.fpa.org/great_decisions/ - purchase of the study guide is encouraged, but not required.)  

The Future of Europe
The outcome of the United Kingdom referendum on EU membership sent shockwaves across the globe. It even caught British voters by surprise. The European Union has helped secure peace in Europe for the past 70 years. Now it faces an uncertain future. Amid a refugee crisis, lingering financial recession and the constant specter of terrorism, unity seems more imperative than ever. But the Brexit vote underscores the complexities of integrating an extremely diverse continent. What will post-Brexit Europe look like, and how can U.S. foreign policy adapt?

Trade and Politics
The U.S. political mood toward trade has gone sour. One need look no further than the 2016 presidential contest for the popular narrative: trade means that China wins, at America’s expense. But do the numbers support that conclusion? The metrics used to gauge economic strength—Gross Domestic Product and balance of trade—have not kept up with the realities of modern manufacturing. Obtaining an accurate picture of U.S. economic stature requires a critique of those numbers. Only then can the U.S. develop appropriate policy solutions for the challenges at hand.

Conflict in the South China Sea
The South China Sea is a locus of competing territorial claims, and China its most vocal claimant. Beijing’s interest has intensified disputes with other countries in the region in recent years, especially since China has increased its naval presence. Despite rising international pressure, including an unfavorable ruling by the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, China staunchly defends its policies in the region. Preventing tensions from boiling over is a matter of careful diplomacy.

Saudi Arabia in Transition
As Saudi Arabia struggles to adjust to the drastic decline in oil revenue, Deputy Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman attempts to boldly transform the country and shift more power to the younger generation. At the same time, many countries such as the U.S. point out the lack of democracy, women’s rights and human rights in Saudi Arabia, and blame its promotion of Wahhabism, an extremely conservative version of Islam, for creating jihadists. Bipartisan criticism of Saudi Arabia is rising in Congress. Both countries need each other, but they are at a crossroads in bilateral relations.

U.S. Foreign Policy and Petroleum
What is the effect of U.S. petroleum security on foreign policy? For 45 years, the country has alternated between periods of energy security and insecurity, sometimes able to wield petroleum as a useful instrument of foreign policy, sometimes not. Despite the so-called “energy revolution,” the U.S. today is by no means disentangled from foreign dependence and global trends. In order to be successful, policymakers must recognize both petroleum security circumstances and patterns in the relationship between petroleum and foreign policy.

Latin America’s Political Pendulum
The pendulum of Latin American politics is swinging rightward once again. Yet as the “pink tide” recedes, the forces of change have more to do with socioeconomics than ideology. Dramatic economic and political crises have coincided in countries like Brazil and Venezuela. Still, the final result for Latin America may be the emergence of centrist, pragmatic modes of governance, and with them, opportunities for the U.S. to improve relations. The new administration must look beyond the neoliberal model of the 1990s, and develop an approach to relations fit for the 21st century.

Prospects for Afghanistan and Pakistan
Major internal conflict has plagued Afghanistan for four decades. The U.S., for its part, has conducted military operations in the country nearly continuously since 9/11. Today, war with the Taliban persists, and tensions between the U.S. and Pakistan have gradually deteriorated. As his time in office drew to a close, President Obama limited further withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan. The incoming administration has a choice: will it maintain the status quo, completely reverse the Obama administration drawdown or withdraw completely? Does the U.S. face a no win situation in Afghanistan and Pakistan?

Nuclear Security
Nuclear nonproliferation was a top priority for the Obama administration. While the Iran Deal was a diplomatic victory toward this end, major threats persist from both state and non-state actors. Countries like North Korea, Russia, and India and Pakistan continue to challenge nonproliferation efforts. The possibility that terrorists will carry out an attack using a “dirty bomb,” made from captured nuclear materials, looks increasingly real. In a fractious world, which way forward for U.S. nuclear security policy?

Doug Finnemore is a retired condensed matter physicist who has taught several OLLI courses with a special interest in Great Decisions.


6. Ames Business and School Visits

Coordinator: Jim Patton
Monday 2:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Four weeks, March 20 – April 10
Cost: $44.00
Various Locations

Class limit 25

This is an opportunity to learn about and visit several local business; the Ames Chamber and Economic Development, Renewable Energy Group, Inc., Monsanto Learning Center, as well as Ames Public Schools. We will tour plants and facilities, learn about products and services provided, and witness the economic impact of these operations on the community.  

The course will be at least moderately physically challenging. Attendees will be walking or standing for 1 to 1 ½ hours. Facilities may not be entirely handicapped accessible.  There may be dress requirements for some locations, such as long pants or leather-top shoes. Specific details relating to each site visit will be emailed to all participants prior to the session.

Car pooling will be desirable for some sites. Unless advised otherwise, participants are expected to meet at the ISU Alumni Center by 2:30 p.m. to allow for administrative briefing and travel time.


7. Learning Your iPad, Section A

Tuesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Eight weeks, March 21 – May 9
Cost: $63.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

This hands-on course will help you get up and running with your iPad (or other iDevice). We will cover the basic setup, operation, and navigation and tackle things you want to learn. Whether you have just bought the iPad and are just beginning or if you are a seasoned user and want to know more, then this course is for you! Please bring your iPad (or other iDevice) to class. We will address what you want to learn and more.

Topics to be covered:

  • Setting up a new iPad
  • Location-based services
  • Setting up mail
  • Setting up iCloud
  • Using book readers and downloading content
  • Reading news
  • Creating documents
  • Safe practices at home and when traveling
  • Addressing your needs

Sam Wormley is a retired associate scientist and principal investigator, CNDE/IPRT/AL at Iowa State and retired as an adjunct professor of astronomy at Marshalltown Community College after 17 years. He regularly teaches science and technology classes for OLLI at Iowa State.


8. The Science and Art of Fishing

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, March 21 – April 11
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

Learn the basics of fishing from beginning skills to master level. Learn about fishing equipment, what is needed, and how to operate each. Masters from Ames Anglers will share their expertise in fishing for specific types of fish, how and where to locate them.

Topics to be covered:

  • Rods, reels, and baits used in fishing
  • Basic fishing – the Bluegill
  • The fun fish – the White Bass
  • Largemouth Bass – Finesse and power techniques
  • Crappie and Smallmouth Bass
  • The Walleye
  • Where can I fish in Story County and Central Iowa
  • Survival in the out of doors
  • Life saving equipment and rescue

Lee Huey is a lifelong fisherman and the founder (2007) and coordinator of Ames Anglers Fishing Club. He is a former agronomist who worked in the hybrid corn and soybean industry.

Les Wolfe is a native Iowan who earned a civil engineering degree at ISU and was a senior partner at FOX Engineering Associates in Ames for 40 years. He grew up fishing the Mississippi River with his father before branching out to central and northeast Iowa rivers, Iowa's COE reservoirs, Iowa's natural lakes, 10 other States, Ontario, Canada, and Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

Jim Trow was introduced to fishing by his father and grandfather, fishing for catfish. He has fished professionally for eleven years in the RCL, PWT, IWT and MWC Walleye Tournaments. In 2005, Trow and his partner won the MWC Cabela's World Walleye Championship and in 2006 they won the coveted Anglers of the Year award in the MWC. Trow has pursued walleyes from Fort Peck, Montana to Port Clinton, Ohio and most of the waters in between.

Mike Cox grew up in southern Iowa and received a degree from Iowa State University in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology in 1992. He spent many years in Vermont and most recently in Alaska where he was the Director of Parks and Recreation for the Fairbanks North Star Borough. In 2011, he returned to his Iowa home and became the Story County Conservation Director. Cox has always had a love for the outdoors and a deep concern for our water quality, and will discuss fishing opportunities in Story County.

Steven D. Lekwa grew up along the Skunk River south of Story City, IA and earned a bachelor's degree in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology from Iowa State University in 1971. He began work for the Story County Conservation Board in 1973, which included sixteen years as a ranger-naturalist, six years as the board's Deputy Director, and sixteen years as the board's Director. Story County Conservation grew to manage over 3000 acres of parks, trails, and wildlife habitat areas with a permanent staff of 16 people during his tenure. In addition to park and resource management operations, the board offers extensive environmental education programming for people of all ages. Lekwa retired in 2011 after serving 38 years with Story County Conservation and still volunteers for Story County Conservation and serves in various capacities with the Boy Scouts. He works part-time, but finds time to hunt, fish, canoe, ride his bike, and enjoy life as a semi-retired grandpa.


9. Norman Rockwell – More than The Saturday Evening Post Covers

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, April 18 – May 9  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

Norman Rockwell was more than an illustrator or Post cover artist. We will examine his art production, his life and relationships, and do a retrospective of his work.

Topics to be covered:

  • The Saturday Evening Post – a critical examination
  • Rockwell’s relationships, variety, humor, and popularity of his work
  • Historical progression of his work – from folk artist to acclaim
  • A Norman Rockwell retrospective

Larry Mitchell is a retired Presbyterian Pastor. He was formerly Curriculum Committee Chair for OLLI at ISU. Other hobbies and interests are wood carving, tennis, travel, and reading of literature, biography and history. He grew up with the “Post” in the late 40s and 50s.


10. Creative Nonfiction – Writing about People, Places, Events -- FULL

Tuesday 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Six weeks, March 21 –  April 25
Cost: $56.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 12

In this course, we will focus on life writing – real things that happened to real people in real places. As class participants, you will start out by reading and discussing a few short samples of published work by nonfiction writers who have taken the stuff of real life and turned it into art – hopefully that will serve as inspiration for your own creative work. Each week, you will write and discuss your own short creative nonfiction assignments in a workshop setting. In the class, we will discuss techniques that nonfiction writers use to strengthen and enhance their writing.

Class discussions will center on key creative writing techniques such as using significant and sensory detail; setting scene; enriching setting; developing characters; creating atmosphere, managing time, and plot/pacing of narrative. Class members will be given generative free-writing exercises to help them start creative pieces of their own. Class time will mostly be given over to workshopping the creative pieces of participants. The class is limited to 12 participants to allow time for all participants to receive workshop feedback. No prior writing experience necessary.

Debra Marquart is a professor of English and the coordinator of the MFA program in creative writing & environment at Iowa State, as well as the senior editor of Flyway: Journal of Writing and Environment. Marquart is the author of five books, including three poetry collections. Marquart’s memoir, The Horizontal World: Growing up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere, received the "Elle Lettres" award from Elle Magazine and the 2007 PEN USA Creative Nonfiction Award.

Shane Griffin received his B.S. in history from ISU. He graduated from Western New Mexico University with a master’s in inter-disciplinary studies with concentrations in English and creative writing in 2013 and is now a candidate in the MFA program in creative writing and environment at Iowa State. He has been working as a firefighter/paramedic for the Des Moines Fire Department for 14 years and is a 14-year veteran of the U.S Armed Forces.

Molly Backes is the author of the YA novel The Princesses of Iowa (Candlewick Press), which was named Chicago Public Library’s Best of the Best Fiction for Teens (2013), Forever Young Adult’s Best YA Books of 2012, and was a finalist on NPR.org’s Best-Ever Teen Novels list in 2012. She has performed her personal essays at a number of Chicago reading series, and is a frequent guest at writing conferences and festivals across the country.


11. ISU Volleyball – Below the Surface

Tuesday, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Four weeks, March 21 – April 11
Cost: $44.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

We are fortunate to have an opportunity to watch elite Iowa State volleyball on a regular basis. This is a great spectator sport that has a good following in the community. There is a lot more to the ISU program than is readily apparent to the novice or even experienced observer. During the Fall 2016 OLLI session, volleyball coach Christy Johnson-Lynch provided an overview of the positions and strategies associated with a modern volleyball program and specifically related to the very successful 2016 Cyclone team. We are now offering an expanded four-week course that will provide deeper insights to the game for both casual and regular fans. Enjoyment of the sport will be enhanced by better understanding the rules, the various positions on the team, and the strategies the coaches employ in different situations. We will have a unique opportunity to see behind the scenes of this very accomplished staff and the operation they have created.   

Topics to be covered:

  • Game knowledge
  • Rules
  • Player positions
  • Rotations
  • Offense and defense
  • Coaching responsibilities
  • Player development
  • Match preparation
  • Team travel
  • Recruiting
  • Developing a fan base
  • Officiating

Some of these topics were covered in the fall session and will be reviewed again. It is not necessary to have attended in the fall in order to enroll in the spring class. If you did attend in the fall, you will certainly want to get the additional insights from this in-depth presentation. Go Cyclones!

Presenters for the individual sessions will include head coach Christy Johnson-Lynch, associate head coach Dawn Sullivan, assistant coach/recruiting coordinator Jen Malcom and other staff members as available as well as a current or retired volleyball official.


12. Preserving Family Memories: Photo Preservation and Digitization

Tuesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Two weeks, April 18 – April 25  
Cost: $32.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

Some of the most precious memories you can pass on to the next generations are captured in photographs. However, often times photographs are left to sit in boxes in the basement, taped to scrapbooks, or placed in photo albums with harsh plastics. This course will demonstrate how to properly store and care for family photos (of any age), and how to properly digitize them. This course will also discuss born-digital photos, and how to store them for long-term use

Topics to be covered:

  • Physical care of print photographs
  • How to manage digital photos

Hannah Frederick is the collections manager at the Ames Historical Society and has her degree in museum studies.

Alex Fejfar is the projects coordinator at the Ames Historical Society and maintains the Society’s digital photo collections.


13. Yellowstone Supervolcano—Past and Future Impact
14. Yellowstone Supervolcano—Past and Future Impact – OLLI ONLINE

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Seven weeks, March 21 – May 9 (no class on April 4)
Cost: $60.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

The geology and geologic history of the mountains, intermontane basins and plains of Wyoming, South Dakota, and Nebraska will be discussed and illustrated. The focus of the course will be the Badlands National Park and the Black Hills of South Dakota, and Yellowstone and Grand Tetons National Parks of Wyoming. An optional excursion to visit the national parks discussed is planned for mid-July.

Topics to be covered:

  • An excursion to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks – an overview of what will be seen on the July trip.
  • A brief review of plate tectonics
  • Geology of Ashfall Fossil State Park, Badlands National Park and the Black Hills
  • Geology of the Hot Springs Mammoth site and the ice age fossils preserved there
  • The geology of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park
  • Yellowstone Supervolcano, its past and future impact

Carl Vondra is emeritus professor of geology and distinguished professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences at Iowa State University; former director of the ISU Geology Field Station in Wyoming; and chair of the ISU Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences from 1991-1997.  He has conducted research projects in Europe, Africa, and Asia. He has led at least 40 student excursions to the Yellowstone-Grand Teton area.


15. Illegals: Russian Spies Next Door Posing as Your American Neighbors
16. Illegals: Russian Spies Next Door Posing as Your American Neighbors OLLI ONLINE

Tuesday 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Four weeks, April 18 – May 9
Cost: $44.00
Reiman Ballroom, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 55

If you've watched the current TV series "The Americans" or saw the movie "Bridge of Spies,” then you know a little something about illegals: Russian spies in this country who can pass themselves off as Americans, or at least as something other than Russians. Of course espionage is illegal, but in its intelligence context, "illegal" refers to a spy who is operating under a false identity. They have a carefully crafted legend, and in many cases seemed to be your normal, average residents of this country – even fooling their neighbors. Starting with Colonel Abel, who was exchanged for U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers – or perhaps going back even earlier – we'll look at some of the more notorious illegal cases. One would be the father who was training his son to follow in his footsteps as a KGB illegal. And illegal operations have not ended with the fall of the Soviet Union. Long after Russia rose from the ashes of "the evil empire,” a network of several illegals was discovered operating in this country. It appears that Russia is a country that loves its spies, and Putin continues to make use of tactics developed by the agency for which he once worked, the notorious KGB. Be sure and watch "The Americans" when the show resumes this winter to give you a fairly accurate idea of the exploits of a husband-and-wife illegal team. We will discuss what they get right and what they get wrong.

Larry Brown graduated from UNI and served as a CIA case officer from 1968-73, then as an intelligence analyst in the Army Reserve from 1974-98, when he retired with the rank of colonel. He also taught French at both UNI and Iowa State. Brown has taught several OLLI courses on the history of American intelligence, the Cold War, and on the struggle with Islamist terrorism. 


17. Medical Tips for Retirees

Coordinator: Louis Banitt
Tuesday 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
Five weeks, April 11 – May 9
Cost: $50.00
Mary Greeley Medical Center auditorium

Class limit 100

Medical tips and information from local specialists for maximizing health in the mature years of life.

Topics to be covered:

  • Adult medicine
  • Orthopedics – How can I maintain bone and joint health?
  • Gastroenterology – How can I reduce my risk for significant gastrointestinal problems?
  • Neurology – Keeping the brain healthy and the latest in stroke treatment
  • Cardiology – What does keeping blood pressure normal mean and why is it important?

Presenters and their certifications are as follows:

Jason Rasmussen  - Cardiology
American Board of Internal Medicine. Education: Wartburg College, BA Mathematics, 2004; University of Iowa, Medicine, 2009. Residency: University of Minnesota, Internal Medicine, 2012. Fellowship: University of Minnesota, Cardiovascular Disease, 2015

Jennifer Killion, MD - Adult Medicine
Diplomate - American Board of Internal Medicine. Education: BS Iowa State University, 1996; MD  University of Iowa College of Medicine, 2000.  Residency: Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 2000-2003.  Professional Societies: American College of Physicians, Iowa Medical Society, Story County Medical Society

Michael Kitchell, MD - Neurology
American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology; American Society of Neuro-Rehabilitation. Education: BS Iowa State University, 1971; MD University of Iowa, 1975. Residency: Neurology ¬- University of Iowa, 1976-1979

Bryan Graveline, MD - Gastroenterology
American Board of Internal Medicine; American Board of Gastroenterology. Education: BS University of California 1982; MD Washington University School of Medicine 1986  Internship: Internal Medicine - Wilford Hall Medical Center, 1986-1987. Residency: Internal Medicine - Wilford Hall Medical Center 1986-1989.  Fellowship: Gastroenterology - University of Missouri,1992-1994

Peter Buck, MD - Orthopedics
Diplomate, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sub-specialty Certification - Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. Education: BA University of Colorado 1974; MD University of Iowa College of Medicine 1978; MA University of Minnesota 1985. Residency: Orthopedic Surgery - Mayo Graduate School of Medicine 1978-1983


18. Learning Your iPad, Section B

Wednesday 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Eight weeks, March 22 – May 10
Cost: $63.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

This hands-on course will help you get up and running with your iPad (or other iDevice). We will cover the basic setup, operation, and navigation and tackle things you want to learn. Whether you have just bought the iPad and are just beginning or if you are a seasoned user and want to know more, then this course is for you! Please bring your iPad (or other iDevice) to class. We will address what you want to learn and more.

Topics to be covered:

  • Setting up a new iPad
  • Location-based services
  • Setting up mail
  • Setting up iCloud
  • Using book readers and downloading content
  • Reading news
  • Creating documents
  • Safe practices at home and when traveling
  • Addressing your needs

Sam Wormley is a retired associate scientist and principal investigator, CNDE/IPRT/AL at Iowa State and retired as an adjunct professor of astronomy at Marshalltown Community College after 17 years. He regularly teaches science and technology classes for OLLI at Iowa State.


19. Over Here: The Great War and the Transformation of American Society

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, March 22 – April 12  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

As its centenary approaches, it is time to take a fresh look at the role of the U.S. in the first World War. To many Americans, WWI has little meaning. But Europeans referred to it as “The Great War.” In 1914, few observers thought that the war would last more than a few weeks. Then it ground on for four long years, only to end in a poorly conceived peace that led to an even more calamitous World War two decades later.

This Powerpoint presentation offers an introduction to the challenges posed to the United States by the Great War. The initial challenge was that of maintaining the long-standing American stance of “avoiding entangling alliances” by issuing a Declaration of Neutrality. This was followed by a steady movement toward joining in the widening hostilities in response to the challenges of Germany policy of unrestricted submarine warfare, the sinking of American shipping and, finally, public outrage over the Zimmerman telegram.

As it turned out, the most far-reaching changes were brought about  the war would be at home rather than abroad. In the course of mobilizing to fight its first war abroad, the U.S. government became larger and more centralized. The re-organization of the economy completed American's transformation from a predominantly rural and agrarian society to a predominantly urban and industrial one. As a result, the American society experienced the types of social unrest that would become increasingly familiar during the century that followed: war-time propaganda fueling fears of foreigners and a resurgence in nativism; the suppression of dissent and the loss of civil liberties; strikes, race riots, and the first “Red Scare.”  

Main source: Over Here: The First World War and American Society (1980, 2004) by David M. Kennedy.

Topics to be covered:

  • Main causes of the war
  • U.S. mobilizes for war
  • The impact of the war on the homefront
  • The U.S. after the war

Ron Palumbo is a retired teacher and social worker. One of his interests is cultural and social history.    


20. Globalization: Understanding the World We Live In

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, April 19 – May 10  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

The focus of this course is to have a better understanding of the world we live in today through the concept of globalization. Globalization is a complex and contested topic that is characterized by more interdependence and interconnection among people, nations, and cultures than any time in human history. This course is intended to provide an introductory knowledge about globalization.  

Topics to be covered:

  • What is globalization?
  • Economic globalization
  • Cultural globalization
  • Impact on environment

Andrew Hong was the director of international programs for the College of Human Sciences and taught the course Developing Global Leadership at ISU. He also taught courses at Oklahoma State University, Purdue University and other institutions.


21. Watercolor: A Look at the Medium in Action

Wednesday 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
One day, April 19  
Cost: $16.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

Watercolor is admired for its transparency, a quality that allows the white of the paper to “glow” through the paint.  But watercolor has a reputation of being a difficult medium to master because of its transparency. This lecture will illustrate the behavior of watercolor on paper under various conditions and discuss the approach one might take to begin painting in watercolor.

Jane Baty is an Ames watercolor artist who exhibits and sells her paintings. Her work can be viewed at www.janebaty.com. She taught “Drawing for People Who Think They Can’t Draw,” “Watercolor Techniques,” and “Watercolor Workshop” during previous OLLI sessions.


22. Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt

Wednesday 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. (please note the end time)
Three weeks, March 22 – April 5  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Theodore Roosevelt was the 26th President of the United States, and served from 1901 to 1909. His presidency was transformative in both domestic and foreign policy. Coming out of the Gilded Age and the excesses of industrialization, TR, like many progressive reformers, wanted to see changes made in our economy. His domestic policy was focused on giving the American people a “square” deal when it came to relations between labor and capital, and his foreign policy came to be known simply as “speak softly and carry a big stick.” Join us for this series of three lectures on one of the most interesting presidents that we have ever had.

A recommended reading list and handout will be provided, and there will be a question and answer session after the lecture.

Bennett Smith is an instructor in history and political science at North Iowa Area Community College. He is also an instructor in various lifelong learning programs including the NIACC lifelong Learning Institute; OLLI at ISU and the LIFE program at Rochester Community and Technical College in Rochester, Minn. He holds a BS degree in speech communication and an MA in history from ISU. He has also done graduate work at the University of Iowa in social foundations of education.


23. An Introduction to Humanism

Wednesday 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
Four weeks, March 22 – April 12
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

Have any of us really had a serious opportunity to make sense of life by considering what it means to be human? Do we want to experience life and make more sense of life in ways we may have never explored? Maybe there are more rational ways to living than those we were given by our culture. In this course we will take the opportunity to explore the deepest questions about the world and the realities of human existence.
 
Join us for a unique adventure: an exploration of what it means to be fully human. Explore with us the ways humanism strives to promote human happiness and fulfillment. As the poet Adrianne Riche once put it, “We are out in a new territory. We are chasing the raven and the wren through gorges unexplored since dawn. The maps are the scientists, novelists, and thinkers who have shaped our modern world.” How did they answer the biggest cosmological questions?  On a more mundane level, how many Humanists does it take to change a light bulb?  Find out why the answer is 'three.'"  

The music is beautiful. The world looks new, for the first time. We are truly thinking outside the box. We will be exploring humanism. Join us!

Topics to be covered:

  • Magical mystery tour - the history and ideology of Humanism
  • Imagine - Humanism's hope for the future
  • I won't back down - Humanism at work
  • Can't stop the feeling - Are you a Humanist?

Paul Knupp received a BA in religion and philosophy from Roberts Wesleyan College, Rochester, N.Y., a Master of Divinity from Princeton Seminary, Princeton, N.J., a Master's of education in educational psychology from the University of Iowa, and a doctorate in education from Drake University. He was a minister for 25 years for various denominations. He taught college for 12 years in Iowa. For the past eight years, he has worked as a psychiatric rehabilitation practitioner for the Broadlawns Path program. He is the co-founder of the Humanist Society of Iowa and the outside sponsor, chaplain, for two Humanist prison chapters at Ft. Madison and Ft. Dodge.


24. Cell Phone Camera Photography Field Trips

Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, March 23 – April 13
Cost: $50.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

Cell phone cameras cannot hope to compete with dSLR cameras with interchangeable lenses, zoom, and aperture control, yet cell phone cameras are being used to create outstanding images by the likes of National Geographic photographers. This course concentrates on how to deal with the limitations and take advantage of the strengths to help you be a better cell phone photographer. We will also explore visualization, perspective, composition, color balance, and light quality.

We will spend our first hour and a half reviewing each other’s images and course materials, followed by shooting photographs as a group at nearby city and county parks.

Topics to be covered:

  • Review of basics
  • Controlling the cell phone camera
  • Improving your images
  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Post image processing

Sam Wormley is a well-known local photographer who regularly contributes photographic services to the Central Iowa Symphony, Ames Town & Gown Chamber Music Association, CoMotion Dance Theater, and photojournalism students at Iowa State.        


25. dSLR Camera Photography Field Trips

Thursday 9:00 a.m – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, April 20 – May 11  
Cost: $50.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 15

dSLR cameras with interchangeable lenses, zoom, and aperture control offer photographers great control. This course concentrates on visualization and how to use your camera to help you be a better photographer. We will explore visualization, perspective, composition, color balance, and light quality. It is said that amateur photographers worry about having good enough equipment, professional photographers worry about satisfying their editors and making money, and master photographers worry about the light.

We will spend our first hour and a half reviewing each other’s images and course materials, followed by shooting photographs as a group at nearby city and county parks.

Topics to be covered:

  • Review of photography basics
  • Controlling the dSLR camera
  • Improving your images
  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Post image processing, printing, backup and storage

Sam Wormley is a well-known local photographer who regularly contributes photographic services to the Central Iowa Symphony, Ames Town & Gown Chamber Music Association, CoMotion Dance Theater, and photojournalism students at Iowa State.


26. Select Constitutional Questions -- FULL

Thursday 11:00 a.m – 12:30 p.m.
Three weeks, March 23 – April 13 (No class April 6)  
Cost: $40.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

The class will review the events and facts which were in the minds of the drafters of the Constitution, and the first ten Amendments (Bill of Rights). How do these assist in answering the questions to be discussed in class?

Topics to be covered:

  • What occurrences and facts prompted the drafting of our present Constitution?
  • Why were the Articles of Confederation scrapped?
  • What is the meaning of the phrase “natural born citizen”?
  • Who qualifies to run for President?
  • The historical development of the 2nd Amendment gun issue. How did we get to where we are now?
  • What should you know about the Electoral Collge system?

Patrick W. Brooks is a 1966 graduate of University of Northern Iowa with two years as a history teacher in Waterloo.  Brooks is a 1971 graduate of the University of Iowa Law School receiving a Juris Doctorate, and was a practicing lawyer for 34 years with four years as Marshall Co. Supervisor.


27. The Chicago Cubs: Their First 141 Years

Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Four weeks, April 20 – May 11  
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

The Chicago Cubs major league baseball team has been in existence for 141 years – the longest period of a team existing in the same city. Interest in these long-time “lovable losers” peaked in 2016 as they fielded the best team in major league baseball and won the World Series for the first time in 108 years. This course will review the team’s colorful history – the good, the bad, and the crazy – and many of their most notable players, and, of course, their renowned ballpark, Wrigley Field.

The course will be in chronological order, beginning with the formation of the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs – today’s “National League” – in 1876 with eight teams, one of them the “Chicago White Stockings” (today’s Chicago Cubs). The history will start with the team’s dominance of the National League in the early years and in the period from 1906 to 1910, with World Series Championships in 1907 and 1908, through a 37-year period of frustration, followed by 71 years without returning to the World Series. Relive some of the great names (including several Hall of Fame members) and games in Cubs history and some of the great stories about the Cubs, including the humorous “Curse of the Billy Goat” that supposedly kept them out of the World Series for 71 years.

Laurent Hodges is professor emeritus of physics at ISU. He has taught a variety of OLLI courses, including The Life of Charles Darwin, Historic Games of Major League Baseball, the Panama Canal, Publishing Your Own E-book, Human Evolution, and Mysteries Solved by DNA.  He authored a recent Kindle ebook about the 2016 Chicago Cubs season: Bye-Bye, Billy Goat: How the Chicago Cubs Won the 2016 World Series, Ending a 71-year Curse and a 108-Year Winless Streak.


28. What in the World?!? An Examination of World Events as They Happen -- FULL

Instructor: Jeff Schroeder
Thursday 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Four weeks, March 23 – April 13
Cost: $44.00
Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

The course will examine world events as they happen. Schroeder will prepare lectures and moderate discussions on current global events. Emphasis will be on international topics of interest.

Topics to be covered will be determined by unfolding events!

Jeff Schroeder earned his Ph.D. from the University of Oregon in comparative political economy after a career in logistics with Fritz Companies (now a division of UPS) where he established air and ocean freight operations in Korea, North China, and the Russian Far East. Schroeder teaches a range of courses for Des Moines Area Community College from international business to international studies while actively consulting on transportation security and global logistics projects. Schroeder is an alumnus of Iowa State, earning a B.S. in history and is a lifetime member of the Iowa State University Alumni Association.


29. Surveying for Civilians

Thursday, 3:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Four weeks, March 23 - April 13
Cost: $44.00 Horton Multi-purpose Conference Room, ISU Alumni Center

Class limit 32

This course is designed to provide the lay person information regarding the mysterious profession of land surveying and its related parts, boundary law, and technology.

Topics to be covered:

  • The history of land surveying from ancient Biblical times to present-day changes in methodology and technology  
  • The United States Public Land Survey System (USPLSS): Its creation, instructions, methods, and perpetuation
  • Principles of land surveying: How it is performed on a day-to-day basis, along with the use of court records and field evidence  
  • Boundary law: Administrative rules controlling procedures and documentation of survey work  
  • The ethics of land surveying: Beyond administrative rules, there is a code to live and work by as a land surveyor.

Bob Stumbo is the founder of Stumbo & Associates Land Surveying, Inc. in Ames and was the owner and president from 1973 -2008. Bob was licensed as a professional land surveyor in 1972. He was a professor of land surveying at Des Moines Area Community College from 2001 -2011. He received the Rud Lubsen Excellence Award in 2010 for Teaching Activities and improvement in Land Surveying Education and was granted emeritus status soon after.


30. Introduction to Kayaking Workshop

Wednesday 1-4 p.m.
One day, June 7 (Rain date: June 14)  
Cost: $25.00
Ada Hayden Park

Class limit 8

This structured workshop will be taught by a certified kayak instructor and will cover safety, equipment and paddling strokes. The class is for beginners but also useful for those with some experience. The class will be offered at Ada Hayden Park in Ames. Kayaks and other paddling gear will be provided by JAX Sporting Goods.

Topics to be covered:

  • Information on paddling
  • How to select a kayak, paddle, and PFDs
  • Skills that will make paddling safer and more fun

Greg Vitale is an American Canoe Association certified kayak and canoe instructor.


Learning on the Road
No. 31 Bioprocessing in Eddyville, Iowa

Coordinator: Stan Hemming
Friday, April 7, 7:45 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
One day, $75
Minimum of 20 needed for this trip; maximum of 50 to fill this trip
Registration Deadline: March 17, 2017 to guarantee a space

The Iowa Bioprocessing Training Center (IBTC) in Eddyville, Iowa is operated by Indian Hill Community College. The IBTC is a 13,000 sq. ft. facility designed specifically to serve bioprocessing industries through training, technical assistance, and workforce development. It was built in 2002 via partnerships with public and private entities such as Cargill, Inc., Iowa Department of Economic Development, Ajinomoto Food Ingredients LLC, Indian Hills Regional Development, Ajinomoto Heartland LLC, USDA Rural Development, Wacker Chemical Corp., The Economic Development Administration Alliant Energy, US Department of Commerce, and MidAmerican Energy. Special features of the Iowa Bioprocess Training Center include a fully functional fermentation training and research laboratory, instrumentation lab, piloting lab, ICN classroom, and large and small meeting rooms.

Schedule for the day:

7:45 a.m. Leave ISU Alumni Center

9:00 – 10:00 a.m. (55 miles) Rest stop at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge information center near Prairie City. Driving tour through refuge to view wildlife.

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. (55 miles) Travel to Eddyville.

11:00 a.m. – noon Sign in at Iowa Bioprocessing Training Center followed by program with center training staff and tour of facility

Noon – 12:30 p.m. Lunch (included in cost)

12:30-3:00 p.m. Presentations from industry spokespersons

  • Cargill corn milling (animal feed, sweetener, ethanol, oil, citric acid)
  • Ajinomoto Heartland (L-Lysine, L-Threonine, AjiLys®, L-Tryptophan, L-Valine)
  • Wacker Chemical Biosolutions (cyclodextrins)
  • Chamness Technologies (compost from bioprocessing organic wastes)

3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Drive-by inspection of Eddyville industries

4:00 – 6:00 p.m. (110 miles) Return to Ames


32. Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Libraries and Museums Overnight Tour

Coordinator: Louis Banitt
May 18 – 19, 2017
Cost:  $300 for a double-occupancy room, $350 for a single room
Minimum of 20 needed for this trip; maximum of 50 to fill this trip
Registration Deadline: March 31, 2017 to guarantee a space

Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum
Activities will include a guided tour, a film presentation, and then time for independent exploration. There are five main categories of objects in the museum which includes gifts to President and Mrs. Truman from foreign heads of state; gifts to the Trumans from private citizens, both American and foreign; personal possessions of the Truman family; political memorabilia relating to the Truman Presidency and the American Presidency in general; and objects associated with the historical events of Truman’s career. Currently there are two permanent exhibits:

  • Truman: The Presidential Year—includes the major issues and events of his presidency
  • Harry S. Truman: His Life and Times—highlights the personal side of the life of Harry Truman and his family.

Dwight D. Eisenhower Library, Museum and Boyhood Home
Activities will include a guided tour of his boyhood home, a film presentation, and then time for independent exploration. The campus consists of the library, museum, visitor’s center, boyhood home, and a place of meditation—the final resting place of Dwight D. Eisenhower, and the Eisenhower statue. The museum is divided into five major galleries consisting of an introductory gallery, a changing exhibits gallery, a First lady’s gallery, a military gallery, and a presidential gallery.

May 18, 2017

7:00 a.m. Leave ISU Alumni Center (includes one rest stop break)

10:30 a.m. Early lunch while riding on the bus

11:00 a.m. Arrive at Truman Presidential Library and Museum

  • Guided tour, movie, and independent exploration (3hrs)

3:00 p.m. Leave Independence and travel to Abilene (3hrs with one stop)

  • Snack/water while traveling on the bus

6:00 p.m. Check-in to hotel and evening meal

  • Holiday Inn Express (110 E Lafayette Ave., Abilene KS)

May 19, 2017

8:45 a.m. Check out of the hotel

9:00 a.m. Arrive at the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library

  • Guided tour of boyhood home, film presentation, and independent exploration (3hrs)

Noon Box lunch on site

12:30 p.m. Leave to travel home

7:00 p.m. Arrive back at ISU Alumni Center (includes two rest stop breaks)

  • Snack/water while traveling on the bus
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